Copenhagen Post: Google to remove Danish music from Youtube

Copenhagen Post: Google to remove Danish music from Youtube. “Google is set to remove Danish music from Youtube following the expiration of its agreement with Koda. The music tracks will be removed from the video-sharing platform on Saturday, reports DR. The development came after it remained unclear how Danish artists should be paid for their music. Koda manages the rights of composers and songwriters.”

Wired: Covid-19 Makes the Case for More Meatpacking Robots

Wired: Covid-19 Makes the Case for More Meatpacking Robots. “… on the other side of the ocean, inside Europe’s largest pig slaughterhouse, the only visible sign that there’s a global pandemic going on is in the break room, where every other chair has been spirited away to leave conspicuous gaps between any would-be socializers. Otherwise, it’s business as usual. That’s because, at this meat plant, robots do most of the work.”

Medium: We’re open! — Thoughts on building a new home for SMK’s online collection

Medium: We’re open! — Thoughts on building a new home for SMK’s online collection. “It’s alive. After months (ok years) of discussion, iteration, and intense testing we’ve now opened the digital door to SMK’s new online collection. We are truly thrilled to be able to contribute to SMK — and openglam — goals of making cultural heritage easily available in friendly, open formats.” SMK is the National Gallery of Denmark.

New York Times: The World’s First Ambassador to the Tech Industry

New York Times: The World’s First Ambassador to the Tech Industry. “Casper Klynge, a career diplomat from Denmark, has worked in some of the world’s most turbulent places. He once spent 18 months embroiled in reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan. For two years, he led a crisis management mission in Kosovo. Yet Mr. Klynge, 46, says his toughest foreign posting may be the one he has now: as the world’s first foreign ambassador to the technology industry.”

The Verge: Errors in cellphone location evidence force Denmark to review 10,000 verdicts

The Verge: Errors in cellphone location evidence force Denmark to review 10,000 verdicts. “Errors in cellphone location data have prompted authorities in Denmark to review 10,700 court cases to see if flawed evidence lead to incorrect convictions. The New York Times reports that the issues date back in 2012, and consist of two bugs. The first relates to how raw data from phone companies is converted into evidence by Danish police, and the second is a bug that could result in cellphones being linked to the wrong cellphone towers.”

Meme journalism on Instagram in Denmark: “It’s necessary if we want to play a part in the lives of the younger audience” (Online Journalism Blog)

Online Journalism Blog: . “With TV audiences ageing and public service broadcasters struggling to retain mass appeal, many news organisations have looked to new platforms to reach younger audiences. At TV2 Østjylland, Instagram was part of the mix — but they were acutely conscious that the organisation could no longer rely on traditional approaches to storytelling that journalists were used to.”

Fin24: Apple, Facebook, Google asked to pay for wind parks in Denmark

Fin24: Apple, Facebook, Google asked to pay for wind parks in Denmark. “Apple, Facebook and Google are facing calls to help pay for wind parks needed to power their planned data centres in Denmark. The companies have chosen the Nordic country, partly because of its abundant supply of green electricity. But a new report suggests that the data centres will consume so much power that local authorities may have to resort to more fossil fuels to cover demand.”

The Local Denmark: Thousands download newly-published list of Danish WW2 Nazis

Newish, definitely, New-to-me, from The Local Denmark: Thousands download newly-published list of Danish WW2 Nazis. “A list detailing of members of the Danish Nazi party, DNSAP, during the Second World War, has been downloaded thousands of times since its online release. The Danish Genealogy Association (Danske Slægtsforskere) earlier this year chose to make available for download a list known as the Bovrup Index, which gives the names of Danish Nazis from before and during the Second World War.”

Museum calls for key-use: Will make mega-collection digital (TV 2 Lorry)

I am translating both the headline and the pull quote from Danish using Google Translate. Apologies for any errors. TV 2 Lorry: Museum calls for key-use: Will make mega-collection digital. “Currently, approximately 4,000 butterflies have been photographed and digitized. But all the small print on the tiny handwritten labels, with information about the butterfly, must also be entered. The mini labels, which are not larger than a nail, are placed on the needle under each butterfly in the collection.” The project is being administered by Zooniverse. I went to the project side and did one butterfly with minimal difficulty (I had a little trouble reading a handwritten label in Danish.) Mostly the project is asking you if labels are there, what the dates are, etc.

The Local Denmark: Denmark’s plants and wildlife to get own website

The Local Denmark: Denmark’s plants and wildlife to get own website. “A new website entitled Danmarks Artsportal, to be launched in 2020, will provide nature enthusiasts with a guide to animals and plants in the Scandinavian country. The web portal, which will be produced by the Natural History Museum of Denmark and the Environmental Protection Agency, will collate public and private data on species of wildlife prevalent in Denmark, the Ministry for the Environment and Food announced in a press statement.”

Geospatial World: Copenhagen to use Google Street View to keep pollution in check

Geospatial World: Copenhagen to use Google Street View to keep pollution in check. “With an aim to measure the air pollution of Copenhagen, the Danish capital’s municipality revealed that it has entered into a strategic partnership with Google. The air quality measuring equipment will be mounted on Google Street View cars which will help to measure the actual pollution levels throughout the city.”

Mashable: Police charge 1,000 people sharing videos of nude teens on Facebook

Mashable: Police charge 1,000 people sharing videos of nude teens on Facebook . “According to Danish police, two videos and a sexually explicit image involving two 15-year-olds were originally posted to Facebook Messenger, the platform’s private chat service. The video was then shared hundreds of times across the platform, and now, a total of 1,004 young people have been charged — and about 800 are male, reports Bloomberg. While the content was posted by someone within Denmark, it’s unclear if everyone accused of sharing it are from the country.”

Ars Technica: Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law

Ars Technica: Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law. “The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law.”

Reuters: Google reported by Danish watchdog for unlimited data storage

Reuters: Google reported by Danish watchdog for unlimited data storage. “A Danish consumer watchdog has reported Alphabet Inc’s Google (GOOGL.O) to the Danish Data Protection Agency for potentially breaking privacy laws by not capping the amount of time personal data is stored on Google’s servers, the watchdog said in a statement on Tuesday.”

SBS: Denmark to appoint ambassador to Google, Apple and Microsoft

SBS: Denmark to appoint ambassador to Google, Apple and Microsoft. “Danish Foreign Minister Anders Samuelsen will appoint an “ambassador” to global tech giants such as Google, Apple, IBM and Microsoft. ‘These companies have become a kind of new nations, which we have to deal with,’ Foreign Minister Samuelsen told Danish newspaper Politiken.”