Canadian Press: Dentists see pandemic stress in patients with more grinding, cracked, broken teeth

Canadian Press: <a href=”https://www.piquenewsmagazine.com/national-news/dentists-see-pandemic-stress-in-patients-with-more-grinding-cracked-broken-teeth-4878684″>Dentists see pandemic stress in patients with more grinding, cracked, broken teeth</a>. “Stress and anxiety connected to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is revealing itself in people’s mouths, say dentists who report increasing cases of patients with cracked, broken and damaged teeth over the past 20 months.”

New York Times: Their Teeth Fell Out. Was It Another Covid-19 Consequence?

New York Times: Their Teeth Fell Out. Was It Another Covid-19 Consequence?. “Earlier this month, Farah Khemili popped a wintergreen breath mint in her mouth and noticed a strange sensation: a bottom tooth wiggling against her tongue. Ms. Khemili, 43, of Voorheesville, N.Y., had never lost an adult tooth. She touched the tooth to confirm it was loose, initially thinking the problem might be the mint. The next day, the tooth flew out of her mouth and into her hand. There was neither blood nor pain.”

EurekAlert: Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation

EurekAlert: Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation. “Dental practices, which are now back in operation, have had to introduce new room decontamination processes and personal protective equipment measures which have dramatically reduced the number of patients that can be treated in a single day. In particular, dentists need to leave long intervals between treatments, leaving rooms unoccupied to allow aerosols to dissipate. This is limiting patient access and challenging financial feasibility for many dental practices worldwide. Now, researchers at Imperial College London and King’s College London have measured and analysed aerosol generation during dental procedures and suggested changes to prevent contamination in the first place to improve safety for both patients and the dental practice workforce.”

FDI World Dental Federation: Study shows dramatic rise in antibiotics prescribed to dental patients in England during COVID-19 lockdown earlier this year

FDI World Dental Federation: Study shows dramatic rise in antibiotics prescribed to dental patients in England during COVID-19 lockdown earlier this year. “One of the unintended consequences of the COVID-19 lockdowns in England earlier this year has been a 25 per cent increase in the prescription of antibiotics by dentists, according to a new study published today in the British Dental Journal (BDJ). Prescription rates were the highest in London, with an increase of 60 per cent for the same period and the lowest increases, less than 10 per cent, were in the South-West of England.”

NBC News: As dentists reopened in late spring, very few got Covid-19, survey finds

NBC News: As dentists reopened in late spring, very few got Covid-19, survey finds. “Rates of Covid-19 among dentists were low in the late spring as dental practices reopened and patients returned, a report published Thursday by the American Dental Association suggests. Researchers conducted a nationwide survey June 8 with responses from more than 2,000 dentists from across the country. Just 0.9 percent, they found, had either confirmed or probable cases of Covid-19.”

Open (Your Wallet) Wide: Dentists Charge Extra For Infection Control (Kaiser Health News)

Kaiser Health News: Open (Your Wallet) Wide: Dentists Charge Extra For Infection Control. “After nearly two months at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Erica Schoenradt was making plans in May to see her dentist for a checkup. Then she received a notice from Swish Dental that the cost of her next visit would include a new $20 ‘infection control fee’ that would likely not be covered by her insurer.”

Slate: What Going to the Dentist Is Like Now

Slate: What Going to the Dentist Is Like Now. “Reopened offices will need a sanitation upgrade. Until COVID-19, practices followed protocols that are largely designed to stop the spread of bloodborne illnesses, because they were developed during the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s. But the way certain dental procedures can make saliva into aerosols makes dentists’ offices a prime environment for dispersing an airborne pathogen like the coronavirus.”

Analyzing Twitter Sentiment for Orthodontic Solutions

What an interesting subject for a thesis: Twitter analysis of the orthodontic patient experience with braces versus Invisalign. “The purpose of this study was to examine the orthodontic patient experience with braces compared to Invisalign® by means of a large-scale Twitter sentiment analysis. A custom data collection program was created to collect tweets containing the words ‘braces’ or ‘Invisalign.’ A hierarchal Naïve Bayes sentiment classifier was developed to sort the tweets into one of five categories: positive, negative, neutral, advertisement, or not applicable. “