Wayne Sutton: 2020 Was The Black In Tech Movement I Waited My Entire Life For, But I Was Too Depressed To Participate.

Wayne Sutton: 2020 Was The Black In Tech Movement I Waited My Entire Life For, But I Was Too Depressed To Participate.. “What’s hard is even with all the data in the world that shows the monetary gains, the benefits, the innovation of having diverse teams, someone will ask, ‘why are you working on diversity?’ What’s hard is looking someone in the eye, knowing damn well they couldn’t care less about diversity, Black humans or LGBTQIA humans or Latinx humans. What’s hard is knowing the only reason people are even exploring a conversation about diversity or inclusion with you is that the manager or CEO asked them to, or they are afraid of negative press.”

WWNO: Facebook Calls Links To Depression Inconclusive. These Researchers Disagree

WWNO: Facebook Calls Links To Depression Inconclusive. These Researchers Disagree. “Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ biggest fear as a parent isn’t gun violence, or drunk driving, or anything related to the pandemic. It’s social media. And specifically, the new sense of ‘brokenness’ she hears about in children in her district, and nationwide. Teen depression and suicide rates have been rising for over a decade, and she sees social apps as a major reason.”

There’s a Name for the Blah You’re Feeling: It’s Called Languishing (New York Times)

New York Times: There’s a Name for the Blah You’re Feeling: It’s Called Languishing. “Colleagues reported that even with vaccines on the horizon, they weren’t excited about 2021. A family member was staying up late to watch ‘National Treasure’ again even though she knows the movie by heart. And instead of bouncing out of bed at 6 a.m., I was lying there until 7, playing Words with Friends. It wasn’t burnout — we still had energy. It wasn’t depression — we didn’t feel hopeless. We just felt somewhat joyless and aimless. It turns out there’s a name for that: languishing.”

Carnegie Mellon University: COVID-related Depression Linked to Reduced Physical Activity

Carnegie Mellon University: COVID-related Depression Linked to Reduced Physical Activity. “New research from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California San Diego found that 61% of surveyed university students were at risk of clinical depression, twice the rate prior to the pandemic. This rise in depression came alongside dramatic shifts in lifestyle habits. The study documents dramatic changes in physical activity, sleep and time use at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Disruptions to physical activity emerged as a leading risk factor for depression. Importantly, those who maintained their exercise habits were at significantly lower risk than those who experienced the large declines in physical activity.”

Brookings: How to responsibly predict depression diagnoses using social media

Brookings: How to responsibly predict depression diagnoses using social media. “In a year when the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked so much havoc on the nation’s collective mental health, research has shown—unsurprisingly—that emotions like sadness, anxiety, depression, and stress are dramatically more prevalent now than they were this time last year. While those lamentable outcomes were measured through traditional surveys, a quiet revolution is under way in the underlying methodology of how mental health researchers and psychologists analyze the sentiment floating around our social media feeds and the internet more broadly.”

Futurity: 1 In 3 Adults Are Anxious Or Depressed Due To Covid-19

Futurity: 1 In 3 Adults Are Anxious Or Depressed Due To Covid-19. “The finding is particularly true for women, younger adults, and those of lower socioeconomic status, the researchers report. COVID-19 continues to pose serious threats to public health worldwide, and interventions such as lockdowns, quarantine, and social distancing are having an adverse impact on mental well-being.”

New Yorker: Our Brains Explain the Season’s Sadness

New Yorker: Our Brains Explain the Season’s Sadness. “I’ve been consumed this fall with a melancholy sadness. It’s different from the loneliness that I felt in the early stage of the pandemic, during the lockdown, when I took a picture of my shadow after a neighborhood walk failed to jumpstart exercise endorphins. Eleven months after COVID-19 spread globally, and during what would otherwise be a joyous Thanksgiving, my sorrow, and surely the emotion of many others, is more complicated.”

BuzzFeed: I Thought I Knew Everything About My Depression. COVID-19 Proved Me Wrong.

BuzzFeed: I Thought I Knew Everything About My Depression. COVID-19 Proved Me Wrong.. “COVID-19 has illuminated within me a deep understanding of mental health during a crisis, particularly the mechanisms by which people grow fearful, paranoid, depressed, helpless, and lost. At the start of this global crisis, I found myself playing the part of the pugnacious prick who told struggling people to just get over it or that they didn’t deserve to be depressed. Through the duration of the pandemic, however, I’ve seen how COVID-19 can deepen our shared experience of isolation and come to understand that the best thing we can do — when focusing on ourselves makes us feel worse — is extend ourselves to others, further the conversation, and ask ourselves if we can take things a step further.” This is a hard read, especially for those of us who have struggled with depression. But it’s a […]

Wired: The Perils of Moderating Depression on Social Media

Wired: The Perils of Moderating Depression on Social Media. “When Instagram users do make their depression publicly visible via hashtags, they code their posts in a way that might seem to counteract a broader potential to make conversations about mental health more visible online. There are lots of potential reasons for this, including an awareness that Instagram moderates content and enduring stigma around depression. In a sense this is a cat-and-mouse game with platform content controls, and it’s an example of the kind of coded practices that help people connect with others online through affinity and relatability. Whatever the specific reasons, our findings force us to rethink how we recognize healthy or productive conversations about mental health.”

Washington Post: Pandemic depression is about to collide with seasonal depression. Make a plan, experts say.

Washington Post: Pandemic depression is about to collide with seasonal depression. Make a plan, experts say.. “A survey study published in the the JAMA Network Open in September found that U.S. adults were reporting levels of depressive symptoms more than three times higher during the pandemic than before it. A survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in June yielded similar results, with more U.S. adults reporting adverse mental health symptoms, particularly in young adults, racial and ethnic minorities and essential workers. (On the flip side, a survey done of U.S. teens from May to July found that teens actually fared well when it came to depression and loneliness.)”

Tubefilter: YouTube Adds Mental Health Information Panels To Videos About Depression, Anxiety

Tubefilter: YouTube Adds Mental Health Information Panels To Videos About Depression, Anxiety. “Since the beginning of the pandemic, YouTube has significantly increased its use of health information panels, which pop up in search results and under videos to provide factual information and updates about specific topics. Now, the platform has expanded these panels to address two common mental illnesses: depression and anxiety. Beginning today, users who search for either illness will see a popup with information and an online screening tool.”

USC News: COVID-19-fueled anxiety and depression peaked in early April, then declined

USC News: COVID-19-fueled anxiety and depression peaked in early April, then declined. “As Americans nationwide hunkered down during stay-at-home orders and tens of millions of workers lost their jobs, 40% of U.S. residents reported feeling anxious and 29% felt depressed in early April. By late May, that percentage had dropped to 27% who felt anxious and 25% who felt depressed. The survey found that 1 in 3 people said they felt lonely, up from 1 in 5 who reported feeling lonely prior to COVID-19.” I hate to find yet another thing for which I am behind schedule.

New York Times: Panicking About Your Kids’ Phones? New Research Says Don’t

New York Times: Panicking About Your Kids’ Phones? New Research Says Don’t. “It has become common wisdom that too much time spent on smartphones and social media is responsible for a recent spike in anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, especially among teenagers. But a growing number of academic researchers have produced studies that suggest the common wisdom is wrong.”