MIT Technology Review: Your smartphone’s AI algorithms could tell if you are depressed

MIT Technology Review: Your smartphone’s AI algorithms could tell if you are depressed. “Depression is a huge problem for millions of people, and it is often compounded by poor mental-health support and stigma. Early diagnosis can help, but many mental disorders are difficult to detect. The machine-learning algorithms that let smartphones identify faces or respond to our voices could help provide a universal and low-cost way of spotting the early signs and getting treatment where it’s needed. “

Science Daily: Social media use increases depression and loneliness, study finds

Science Daily: Social media use increases depression and loneliness, study finds . “Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram may not be great for personal well-being. The first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness.”

Phys .org: Social media buffers depression among older adults with pain

Phys .org: Social media buffers depression among older adults with pain. “With a few finger strokes or swipes on a computer or cell phone, seniors with pain reduce the risk of depression when visiting social media sites. In a newly published University of Michigan study, researchers reported that using social media can reduce the negative health effects of curtailed social contact that comes as a consequence of pain.”

Penn Today: Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses

Penn Today: Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses. “In any given year, depression affects more than 6 percent of the adult population in the United States—some 16 million people—but fewer than half receive the treatment they need. What if an algorithm could scan social media and point to linguistic red flags of the disease before a formal medical diagnosis had been made? New research from the University of Pennsylvania and Stony Brook University published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows this is now more plausible than ever.”

Reuters: Good social media experiences don’t outweigh bad ones for young adults

Reuters: Good social media experiences don’t outweigh bad ones for young adults. “For young adults, the adverse effect of negative social media experiences on mental health outweigh any potential benefits of positive experiences, a study of university students suggests. Each 10 percent increase in a student’s negative experiences on social media was associated with a 20 percent increase in the odds of depressive symptoms, researchers found.”

The Quint: Negative social media experiences linked to depression

The Quint: Negative social media experiences linked to depression. “Negative experiences on social media carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to the likelihood of young adults reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new study. The findings, published in the journal Depression and Anxiety, suggests that negative experiences on social media were associated with depressive symptoms.”

LiveScience: These 5 Social Media Habits Are Linked with Depression

LiveScience: These 5 Social Media Habits Are Linked with Depression. “You might be familiar with the experience of scrolling through your Facebook feed, only to feel like everyone else’s lives are better than yours. But such ‘social comparisons’ may be linked with a higher likelihood of having depression. That’s one finding from a new study that identified a total of five social media behaviors linked with the mental health condition. The study was presented May 25 at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science in San Francisco.”