New York Times: The Strange Lives of Objects in the Coronavirus Era

New York Times: The Strange Lives of Objects in the Coronavirus Era. “A set of new objects has emerged in the last few months to address the new reality of illness, lockdown, social distancing and social protest. Some of these objects are wacky and unrealized — speculative concepts that may never see the light of day. Others, like cocktails-in-a-bag, thermometers and all manner of partitions, are already circulating widely. And some aren’t new at all: familiar household items like bottles of Lysol and rolls of toilet paper, which have taken on new meaning and importance because of scarcity or sudden unusual needs.”

The Next Web: How an AI graphic designer convinced clients it was human

The Next Web: How an AI graphic designer convinced clients it was human. “Nikolay Ironov had been working as a graphic designer for more than a year before he revealed his secret. As an employee of Art. Lebedev Studio — Russia’s largest design company — Ironov had already worked on more than 20 commercial projects, creating everything from beer bottle labels to startup logos. But Ironov was not the person he claimed to be. In fact, the designer was not a person at all.”

InPark Magazine: New website offers tool for attraction designers based on work of industry legend Harrison ‘Buzz’ Price

A little outside my usual, but I like it; this site reminds me of some of the “expert in a box” systems you’d hear about from Tom Peters. InPark Magazine: New website offers tool for attraction designers based on work of industry legend Harrison ‘Buzz’ Price. “The site is essentially a question and answer session with Buzz Price. First, he asks visitors to the web site a few questions about their potential project, such as desired attendance, seasonality, attraction mix, etc. Then, after sharing calculations on peak month, peak week and design day attendance, people can ask Buzz Price questions…”

Lifehacker: Download Pantone’s Free New App to Create Perfect Color Palettes

Lifehacker: Download Pantone’s Free New App to Create Perfect Color Palettes. “Are you someone who appreciates the subtle difference between two similar shades of red? Do you anxiously await the announcement of Pantone’s color of the year? Are you constantly making mental plans to redo various rooms in your home, despite not actually having the time, money or energy to do it? If so, you’ll probably enjoy a free new app from Pantone that lets you quickly and easily put together color palettes. Here’s what it does and how to download it.”

Hongkiat: 100 Free Fonts for Commercial and Personal Use

Hongkiat: 100 Free Fonts for Commercial and Personal Use. “Each time a designer starts work on a new design, there is always a big problem: a lack of high-quality materials, such as fonts, icons, images etc. Of course, you can create a font that will properly fit the design you created, but it’s not a good idea since font creation takes a lot of time, which is never enough when you have to work within a deadline. The solution is simple: you can use ready-made free fonts. There are tons of them all over the web, and we have but collected a small group of 100 free fronts you can download here.”

The Conversation: Yes, websites really are starting to look more similar

The Conversation: Yes, websites really are starting to look more similar. “Over the past few years, articles and blog posts have started to ask some version of the same question: ‘Why are all websites starting to look the same?’ These posts usually point out some common design elements, from large images with superimposed text, to hamburger menus, which are those three horizontal lines that, when clicked, reveal a list of page options to choose from. My colleagues Bardia Doosti, David Crandall, Norman Su and I were studying the history of the web when we started to notice these posts cropping up. None of the authors had done any sort of empirical study, though. It was more of a hunch they had.”

Wallpaper: 3D renders bring this New York digital design fair to life

Wallpaper: 3D renders bring this New York digital design fair to life. “New York City’s annual design festival, NYCxDesign may officially be postponed until October, but for the online design magazine Sight Unseen, which has championed emerging design since it was established in 2009, the underlying uncertainty of present times propelled founders Jill Singer and Monica Khemsurov to press on with organising their annual showcase Sight Unseen Offsite, at its regularly scheduled time. Launching this week, Sight Unseen Offsite’s very first digital design fair, which the duo have christened Offsite Online, showcases a varied selection of 60 designers and brands bringing new furniture and objects to the web-based exhibition.”

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period. “The Japanese Collection of the British Library includes around 50 Japanese pattern and design books. Thanks to a grant from the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, the Library is digitising many of these and making them available online. For a list of what is currently available see Japanese manuscripts and woodblock-printed books relating to design arranged by theme. This series of blog posts features some of the items in the collection, the artists who created them and the publishers who produced them.”

TechSpot: Take a trip down memory lane with this virtual collection of big box PC games

TechSpot: Take a trip down memory lane with this virtual collection of big box PC games. “Video game box illustration is a bit of a lost art. Years ago, the physical retail package that a game came in was arguably just as important as the title itself. Quality box art could help a game stand out among the sea of otherwise mundane choices and even influence purchasing or rental decisions on the spot….With that in mind, we have to give a huge nod to the curator over at Big Box Collection. A lifelong gamer, Benjamin Wimmer has set about collecting all of the big box PC games he has enjoyed since the late 80s, scanning them into a 3D database and sharing them with the Internet at large. The result is a digital collection of more than 600 titles for your perusing.”

Washingtonian: These Excellent Covid-19 Posters Are Both Beautiful and Beneficial

Washingtonian: These Excellent Covid-19 Posters Are Both Beautiful and Beneficial. “The Viral Art Project is a virtual art gallery that invites graphic designers and artists to submit original poster designs that respond visually to the Covid-19 pandemic. The idea is to raise awareness of the challenges facing the world while also promoting messages of hope and security. The results so far have been striking—an ever-growing collection of posters that demonstrate how powerful typography and graphic design can be.”

Limerick Post: LSAD project to reveal the impact of design on life, culture, business and society in Ireland

Limerick Post: LSAD project to reveal the impact of design on life, culture, business and society in Ireland. “Map Irish Design, new research that examines more that 2300 design projects to reveal the impact of design on life, culture, business and society in Ireland over the past decade was recently launched.”

The BayNet: Southern Maryland Engineers Hope to Solve Ventilator Shortage With Breast Pumps

The BayNet: Southern Maryland Engineers Hope to Solve Ventilator Shortage With Breast Pumps. ” There are a lot of moms that still have them sitting around. Maybe stuffed in a drawer, maybe in a random bedroom closet, or maybe just tucked away with the rest of that old diaper bag you used before your baby grew up. Of course, we are talking about those old breast pumps that sit around collecting dust after you no longer need them. But this team of engineers from Southern Maryland hopes they found a new use for those pumps. In the midst of a global health pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus(COVID-19), their ingenuity could potentially save thousands of lives that will be impacted by a shortage of ventilators across the country.”

CNET: MIT’s new face-shield design could help hospitals with PPE shortages

CNET: MIT’s new face-shield design could help hospitals with PPE shortages. “Martin Culpepper, an MIT engineering professor, led a team to design a new type of shield cut with lasers that’s foldable so it can be stacked in mass quantities and shipped in boxes by the thousands.”

San Francisco Chronicle: Letterform Archive makes striking typefaces available to public with online archive

San Francisco Chronicle: Letterform Archive makes striking typefaces available to public with online archive. “So far, 1,500 of the collection’s more than 60,000 pieces have been digitized. Browse the site, and you can find all manner of tags, posters, mailing labels, advertisements, business cards, book covers and letterhead. There is a booklet from Sri Lanka from 1959, a bound book from Russia from 1912 and a loose leaf from a Spanish Quran from 1150.”

Las Vegas Review-Journal: Social media influences architectural design

Las Vegas Review-Journal: Social media influences architectural design. “Instagram culture is redefining architectural design across the country, in both commercial and residential spaces. In recent years, architecture and design firms have been introducing a new concept referred to as ‘Instagram spots’ in their designs to keep up with the growing social media trends.”