Creative Review: How the Pandemic Graphic Archive is preserving our new reality

Creative Review: How the Pandemic Graphic Archive is preserving our new reality. “The Pandemic Graphic Archive is one of the various online archives and initiatives cropping up in response to our new reality, just as major cultural institutions have scrabbled to add Covid-related objects to their collections. The ongoing project is the brainchild of recent graphic design graduate Charlotte Walker who, faced with the prospect of an unstable employment market, launched the archive after finishing up at Liverpool John Moores University last summer.” A LOT of floor signage.

GlobalVoices: Myanmar illustrators unite to distribute protest art for free

GlobalVoices: Myanmar illustrators unite to distribute protest art for free. “A group of 30 artists from Myanmar uploaded more than a hundred protest posters… for free print and use by those rallying against the military coup….The collective noticed that protesters were bringing placards with the illustrators’ art to demonstrations, and indeed many artists had shared their poster designs online for free.”

AD PRO: This Digital Library Is Bringing Overdue Recognition to Marginalized Designers

AD PRO: This Digital Library Is Bringing Overdue Recognition to Marginalized Designers. “…while they may all look different, [Pascale] Sablan’s hats are cut from the same cloth: Her universal goal is to engage the greater community through architecture and advocate for equitable and diverse environments. One of the many ways she’s achieving that is by building the Great Diverse Designers Library, which Sablan started earlier this year. The virtual resource, which features more than 400 women and people of color, is an ever-evolving repository of great talent with the aim of providing long-overdue recognition for marginalized groups.”

Make Tech Easier: The Beginner’s Guide to Git

Make Tech Easier: The Beginner’s Guide to Git . “If you’re a Linux user, you’ve likely come across Git at some point, perhaps while trying to download a new program or looking into version control systems like CVS or Subversion. Git is the revision control system created by the Linux kernel’s famous Linus Torvalds, due to a lack of satisfaction with existing solutions. The main emphasis in the design was on speed, or more specifically, efficiency. Git addresses many of the shortcomings of previous systems and does it all in much less time. If you are looking to learn Git, this beginner’s guide will help you get started.”

Government of Australia: Bottle label directory to protect wine industry

Government of Australia: Bottle label directory to protect wine industry. “Legislation passed parliament yesterday enabling Wine Australia to establish a Wine Export Label Directory to help wine brand owners protect their export wine labels against copycat labelling. Minister for Agriculture David Littleproud said the passing of the Wine Australia Amendment (Label Directory) Act 2020 will lead to the creation of an online database of all Australian export wine labels.”

Packaging Today: BPF Launches Online Database of Sustainable Design Guides and Tools

Packaging Today: BPF Launches Online Database of Sustainable Design Guides and Tools . The BPF is the British Plastics Federation. “The new online resource includes numerous design guides for making plastic packaging more recyclable, guides for incorporating recycled content in products, general guides about sustainability, as well as interactive tools such as carbon calculators. The searchable database presents a wealth of insight into plastic packaging design at a variety of technical levels, which can ultimately help to reduce the overall environmental impact of products.”

Domestika: This Digital Archive Is a Treasure Chest of Typography and Design

Domestika: This Digital Archive Is a Treasure Chest of Typography and Design. “The TM Research Archive is a website created by a Swiss student, called Louise Paradis, as her final project for her master’s degree. It compiles information about and images from Typographische Monatsblätter, dating between the 1970s and 1990s. It is a treasure chest filled to the brim with dozens of covers, indexes from different issues, and detailed biographies of its most prominent designers and typographers.”

Hyperallergic: Guerrilla Girls and Julie Mehretu Among 60+ Artists Helping You “Plan Your Vote”

Hyperallergic: Guerrilla Girls and Julie Mehretu Among 60+ Artists Helping You “Plan Your Vote”. “A new, nonpartisan initiative launched by the nonprofit Vote.org seeks to channel the power of art to encourage voter participation. Along with links to register to vote, check absentee status, and set voting reminders, among other crucial resources, the ‘Plan Your Vote’ website offers a digital library of voting advocacy visuals that are free for anyone to download and circulate.”

Oil Paintings To Vectors: The Archive Finding The History Of Arabic Book Cover Design (Scene Arabia)

I found a more recent story about this Instagram archive, but it’s not a patch on this July article from Scene Arabia: Oil Paintings To Vectors: The Archive Finding The History Of Arabic Book Cover Design. “Throughout the Arab world, there is one artist whose work can be found in every home, whether or not we know it. ‘There is not one household that doesn’t have my paintings,’ the late Egyptian painter Gamal Kotb once said of his ubiquitous work that needed no canvas, no heavy frames, and no galleries to exhibit. Throughout much of the 20th century, Kotb made a name for himself creating the covers for bestselling novels by the biggest names in publishing, including Naguib Mahfouz, Ihsan Abdel Quddous, and Yusuf Idris. The artist became one of Egypt and the Arab world’s most celebrated artists, albeit in a medium that remains wildly underrated today.”

Bloomberg CityLab: Get Lost in 70 Years of Old IKEA Catalogs

Bloomberg CityLab: Get Lost in 70 Years of Old IKEA Catalogs. “As millions of people around the world become intimately familiar with their home decor, the Swedish furniture giant IKEA is offering an online resource to fuel your redecoration reveries: In honor of the the 70th anniversary of the company’s first catalog, IKEA just dropped digital versions of every catalog on its museum website. If your idea of a good time is wandering the labyrinth of your local IKEA showroom, trying out sectionals in a pretend living room, this digital trove of modular furniture makes an excellent and Covid-safe alternative distraction — and a fascinating time capsule of Scandinavian design trends.”

Graphic Design in the Friendly Skies: Seatback Safety

Spotted via Reddit: Seatback Safety. From the Why Page: “As a professional designer, it can be valuable to contemplate how practitioners solved the same problem over time with different fashions and different tools. Seatback Safety cards have been used since the dawn of commercial flight. While their pamphlet form has remained largely the same for a century, they have significantly evolved in ways that reflected broader social and technological trends.”

New York Times: Swipe-Through Activist Guides Are the New Zines

New York Times: Swipe-Through Activist Guides Are the New Zines. “The Yellow Pages stopped printing. Libraries are largely closed. And fliers, well designed as they may be, don’t always meet people where they are. So in this time of grief, isolation and information overload, some are taking a creative approach to resource sharing. Artists, activists and academics are publishing mini-guides on Instagram — swipe-through galleries of text and visuals that help people find local businesses to support and fund community fridges; learn about mutual aid efforts in their neighborhood and the global effects of climate change; locate Black healers and wellness spaces; and nourish themselves, among other things.”

New York Times: The Strange Lives of Objects in the Coronavirus Era

New York Times: The Strange Lives of Objects in the Coronavirus Era. “A set of new objects has emerged in the last few months to address the new reality of illness, lockdown, social distancing and social protest. Some of these objects are wacky and unrealized — speculative concepts that may never see the light of day. Others, like cocktails-in-a-bag, thermometers and all manner of partitions, are already circulating widely. And some aren’t new at all: familiar household items like bottles of Lysol and rolls of toilet paper, which have taken on new meaning and importance because of scarcity or sudden unusual needs.”