Dezeen: Instagram design guide shows architects how to create “a visual sense of amazement”

Dezeen: Instagram design guide shows architects how to create “a visual sense of amazement”. “Architects should make Instagram-friendly elements a central part of their designs for hotels, bars and restaurants to boost their chances of success, according to a new report. Created by Australian studio Vale Architects, the Instagram Design Guide says that the image-sharing platform now plays a key role in the success of hospitality projects.” Rarely have I read a story and felt so conflicted.

Okayafrica: Industrie Africa Is the New Platform To Discover Top African Designers

Okayafrica: Industrie Africa Is the New Platform To Discover Top African Designers. “Named the ‘Wikipedia of African Fashion’ by Vogue, Industrie Africa is a new digital showroom featuring African designers. The website was launched on June 1 by Nisha Kanabar and Georgia Bobley who wanted to create an online platform that reflected the growing diversity of designers across the continent. The platform currently has over 80 designers from 24 different countries.”

Instagram Worthy: How Social Media Has Reshaped Our Ideas On Attractive Design (Forbes)

Forbes: Instagram Worthy: How Social Media Has Reshaped Our Ideas On Attractive Design. “When it comes to designing office and living spaces, people are relying on two social media platforms. The highly visual nature of Instagram and Pinterest make them ideal places for finding design inspiration, even making purchasing decisions…. ‘Instagram worthy’ home is now a thing and a lot of younger consumers admit that they specifically seek out decor items that would look good on social media. Yet the impact of social media on our perception of ‘pretty’ doesn’t end here.”

It’s the CR archive: 448 print issues, from 1980 to 2018 (Creative Review)

Creative Review: It’s the CR archive: 448 print issues, from 1980 to 2018. “The first issue of Creative Review came out in May 1980. The cover (above) featured Terence Conran, posing proudly behind a packaging range for now defunct supermarket International, and stills from commercials for Renault, a COI seatbelt campaign, Richard Shops and Barclaycard, in which Dudley Moore played a rather middle-aged punk.” The archive is not free but is available as part of a subscription package. Student rates are also available.

MIT: Digital archive showcases work from the Center for Advanced Visual Studies

MIT: Digital archive showcases work from the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. “In 1967, the newly established MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS), founded by professor György Kepes and conceived as a fellowship program for artists, welcomed its first three fellows. Pioneering work at the intersection of art, science, and technology quickly got underway, and in the following decades, more than 200 fellows arrived to participate in this globally influential program, along with researchers and graduate students. Now, as part of a year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of CAVS, a new interactive digital archive is offering public access to experimental work created by the fellows, including world-renowned artists such as Otto Piene, Aldo Tambellini, Yvonne Rainer, Nam June Paik, Muriel Cooper, and Stan VanDerBeek.”

Duke University Libraries: Can’t we just make a Venn diagram?

This is good! A walkthrough of the thought process that turns a pile of data into an information visualization. From Duke University Libraries: Can’t we just make a Venn diagram?. “When I’m teaching effective visualization principles, one of the most instructive processes is critiquing published visualizations and reviewing reworks done by professionals…. What we don’t usually get to see is the progression of an individual visualization throughout the design process, from data through rough drafts to final product. I thought it might be instructive to walk through an example from one of my recent consults. Some of the details have been changed because the work is unpublished and the jargon doesn’t help the story.”