VentureBeat: Jigsaw’s Assembler helps media organizations spot deepfake images

VentureBeat: Jigsaw’s Assembler helps media organizations spot deepfake images. “In an age of pervasive deepfakes, how can anyone know if an image they’re viewing is an AI-generated fabrication? Jigsaw — the organization working under Google parent company Alphabet to tackle cyberbullying, censorship, disinformation, and other digital issues — is prototyping a tool called Assembler to address this concern. Jigsaw CEO Jared Cohen revealed in a blog post that the tool is being piloted with media organizations to help fact-checkers and journalists pinpoint and analyze manipulated media.”

EurekAlert: New research uses physiological cues to distinguish computer-generated faces from human ones

EurekAlert: New research uses physiological cues to distinguish computer-generated faces from human ones. “‘Digital human face detection in video sequences via a physiological signal analysis,’ a paper published today in the Journal of Electronic Imaging (JEI), presents a viable, innovative way to discern between natural humans (NAT) and CG faces within the context of multimedia forensics, using individuals’ heart rate as the discriminating feature.”

Phys .org: Researchers identify seven types of fake news, aiding better detection

Phys .org: Researchers identify seven types of fake news, aiding better detection. “To help people spot fake news, or create technology that can automatically detect misleading content, scholars first need to know exactly what fake news is, according to a team of Penn State researchers. However, they add, that’s not as simple as it sounds.”

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes. “Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times are tired of seeing fake media propagate, and they’re teaming up to do something about it. The trio has launched a Content Authenticity Initiative that aims to create a standard for digital media attribution. Ideally, you’d know whether or not a picture or video is legitimate simply by examining the file — you’d know if it had been manipulated.”

Poynter: Meet Forensia, a software ready to debunk fake WhatsApp audio files

Poynter: Meet Forensia, a software ready to debunk fake WhatsApp audio files. “Fact-checkers usually roll their eyes when they need to verify an audio file extracted from WhatsApp. They know it’s a time-consuming task and there is a lack of tools to help them reach a verdict about the voice they hear. This scenario, however, has just changed. Forensia is up and running in Buenos Aires, and ready to work in Saxon and Romance languages — but not for free.”

Reuters: Facebook, Microsoft launch contest to detect deepfake videos

Reuters: Facebook, Microsoft launch contest to detect deepfake videos . “Facebook Inc is teaming up with Microsoft Corp, the Partnership on AI coalition and academics from several universities to launch a contest to better detect deepfakes, the company said in a blog post here on Thursday.”

Bloomberg: U.S. Unleashes Military to Fight Fake News, Disinformation

Bloomberg: U.S. Unleashes Military to Fight Fake News, Disinformation . “The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency wants custom software that can unearth fakes hidden among more than 500,000 stories, photos, video and audio clips. If successful, the system after four years of trials may expand to detect malicious intent and prevent viral fake news from polarizing society.”