Kunstverein in Hamburg Trying to Raise Funds for Digital Archive Via Kickstarter

The Kunstverein in Hamburg is turning to Kickstarter to create a digital archive for its 200th anniversary. “In 2017 the Kunstverein in Hamburg is celebrating its 200th anniversary as one of Germany’s key non-profit institutions for contemporary art. Celebrating this achievement and after a three- year long research, together with the Department of Art History at University Hamburg, the Kunstverein seeks to launch a Digital Archive. Starting from 1817 the project will establish a systematic and sustainable method of preserving our rich archive. The success of this project will allow a broad community of users to search the archive rapidly and comprehensively from anywhere at any time, making this indispensable information accessible to scholars, librarians, students, and everyday internet users.” The fundraising goal is about $22,000; a little over $9000 has been raised so far.

Philadelphia Inquirer: ‘Fresh Air,’ fresh forever: 30 years as national show, new digital archive

Philadelphia Inquirer: ‘Fresh Air,’ fresh forever: 30 years as national show, new digital archive. “Fresh Air has been digitized, archived, and put online. As many of the old, old, tapes as possible, going back to the 1970s, have been baked (that’s what you do!), played, and their data turned into WAV and mp3 files and parked at a big catalogue site named WorldCat.org… More than 8,000 segments across more than 7,000 shows are now online.” If this is ringing a bell for you, I mentioned the grant for this project back in 2015.

The Signal: New Home and Features for Sustainability of Digital Formats Site

The Signal: New Home and Features for Sustainability of Digital Formats Site. “The Library of Congress’ Sustainability of Digital Formats Web site (informally just known as ‘Formats’) details and analyzes the technical aspects of digital formats with a focus towards strategic planning regarding formats for digital content, especially collection policies. Launched in 2004, Formats provides in-depth descriptions of over 400 formats sorted into content categories: still image, sound, textual, moving image, Web archive, datasets, geospatial and generic formats with more to come…. Not ones to rest on our laurels, we are excited to announce recent updates and improvements for Formats.”

Creating a web-based digital photographic archive: one hospital library’s experience (JMLA)

From the JMLA: Creating a web-based digital photographic archive: one hospital library’s experience. “Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a nonprofit community hospital based in Los Angeles. Its history spans over 100 years, and its growth and development from the merging of 2 Jewish hospitals, Mount Sinai and Cedars of Lebanon, is also part of the history of Los Angeles. The medical library collects and maintains the hospital’s photographic archive, to which retiring physicians, nurses, and an active Community Relations Department have donated photographs over the years. The collection was growing rapidly, it was impossible to display all the materials, and much of the collection was inaccessible to patrons.” The full article is available and is licensed CC-BY.

US Naval War College: Navy higher education libraries announce digital archives and preservation collaborative

This was announced late February, but I just found out about it. From the US Naval War College: Navy higher education libraries announce digital archives and preservation collaborative. “U.S. Naval War College (NWC) Library has announced initial implementation of TRIREME digital repository and preservation system. The name TRIREME comes from the ancient Mediterranean maritime vessels with three banks of oars. It stands as a metaphor for the three institutions of higher education involved in the initial pilot project: the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md.; and NWC. TRIREME is the result of a two-year collaboration between Navy higher education libraries and a leading software developer in digital preservation technology and was launched worldwide today. It is open to the public.” Didn’t seem like a lot was here yet and it’s really tough to browse.

Digirati: Digirati to build Indigenous Digital Archive platform

Digirati: Digirati to build Indigenous Digital Archive platform. “Digirati are building a new open source crowdsourcing platform for the Indigenous Digital Archive, a project of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe. The project will enable engagement with authentic public documents of community history, government actions, and civic life in New Mexico. The first phase will focus on open public records related to land and to the government Indian Boarding Schools from the late 1800s into the 1920s and 30s.”

Washington Post: This is how you photograph a million dead plants without losing your mind

Washington Post: This is how you photograph a million dead plants without losing your mind. “The sounds fill the windowless room deep in the bowels of the National Museum of Natural History where she works. Eight hours a day, five days a week, every week for the past 16 months, [Rochelle] Safo has helped operate a huge conveyor belt designed to digitize the museum’s vast botany collection. Deftly, she and her two fellow digitizers place papers bearing pressed plants on the belt, pass them under a camera, snap a photo, check the image on the computer, then replace the sheets in their folder. Click, beep, whir.” It’s good to remember how much work goes into the digital archives we see online.