Crowdsourcing Traumatic History: Understanding the Historial Archive (The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy)

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy: Crowdsourcing Traumatic History: Understanding the Historial Archive. “This article discusses the challenges and opportunities for digital archives that aim to both historicize and memorialize recent tragedies through crowdsourcing materials from the public. Using an archive built after the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings as an example, I offer the term “historial archive” as a distinction from the much-critiqued adoption of the word “(A)rchive(s)” that we see used throughout the disciplines. Although crowdsourcing in this type of archive works as a catalyst for community, the speed of collection operates (rhetorically at least) as an active buttress against the problems of provenance. That is, historical archives must go to great lengths to verify the veracity and historicity of their collections; in the historial archive’s more philosophic approach to history, the time-sensitive collection methods ensure the archive’s veracity and historicity. Using my own research, I model how students may approach historial archives and the ways these types of repositories can allow for various productive paths that go beyond simply aggregating primary materials.”

CBC: Hard drive full of Art City’s history returned after break-in

Yay! CBC: Hard drive full of Art City’s history returned after break-in. “A treasured backup drive holding more 20 years of history was returned to its rightful owners at Art City on Saturday afternoon. On Boxing Day, the non-profit organization’s office on Broadway was broken into; the archive was stolen, along with a 3D printer, several digital cameras and a scanner.”

CBC: Art City pleads for return of digital archive stolen in Christmas break-in

CBC: Art City pleads for return of digital archive stolen in Christmas break-in. “The organization, based in Winnipeg’s West Broadway neighbourhood, is not overly concerned with the pieces of equipment that were taken, as it’s all replaceable, Ruth said. What they are concerned about, however, is a digital backup drive that was taken which contains thousands of photographs and other records of Art City’s 20-year history providing after-school art programs for youth.”

The Next Web: Reddit’s data hoarders are frantically trying to save Tumblr’s NSFW content

The Next Web: Reddit’s data hoarders are frantically trying to save Tumblr’s NSFW content. “By Wednesday afternoon, just two days after the announcement, a group was already hard at work attempting to archive the whole damn thing, or, most of it anyway. Redditor u/itdnhr began the process, collecting some 67,000 NSFW Tumblr accounts and compiling a massive list. He then shared it with r/Datasets, where other redditors stripped the non-working accounts, leaving 43,000 accounts. Preserving Tumblr‘s NSFW accounts, though, isn’t without its challenges, both in scope and legality.”

Yale News: Online search tool ‘lifting a veil’ on Yale’s collections

Yale News: Online search tool ‘lifting a veil’ on Yale’s collections. “Archives at Yale, a new software tool launched in early September, allows students, faculty, and other researchers to search more precisely across and within more than 5,000 collections held by 10 Yale libraries and museums. The new tool is based on a widely used open-source web application — which means that Yale’s investment in developing it will benefit other libraries and museums around the world. “

New York Times: The Village Voice, a New York Icon, Closes

New York Times: The Village Voice, a New York Icon, Closes. “Staff members said they were not surprised that the end had come. The paper’s last editor in chief, Stephen Mooallem — the third top editor to serve under Mr. Barbey during his three-year tenure as owner — left in May and was not replaced. Some staff members will stay on to make the paper’s print archive digitally accessible; the rest will be out of a job at a time when the local news industry finds itself in crisis.”

Inspiring the future: Why Apple should establish an official public archive (9to5Mac)

9to5Mac: Inspiring the future: Why Apple should establish an official public archive. “Last week, Apple celebrated 20 years of the iMac. Major anniversaries are today relatively uncommon for the company, but will become increasingly prevalent in the future. Now 42 years old, Apple is a cornerstone in the technology industry. With such a rich and unique history, Apple’s products and values deserve to be properly catalogued through an official digital archive.”