Inspiring the future: Why Apple should establish an official public archive (9to5Mac)

9to5Mac: Inspiring the future: Why Apple should establish an official public archive. “Last week, Apple celebrated 20 years of the iMac. Major anniversaries are today relatively uncommon for the company, but will become increasingly prevalent in the future. Now 42 years old, Apple is a cornerstone in the technology industry. With such a rich and unique history, Apple’s products and values deserve to be properly catalogued through an official digital archive.”

Engadget: Researchers digitize writing with cheap, touch-sensitive paper

Engadget: Researchers digitize writing with cheap, touch-sensitive paper. “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a paper that can track touch, which, among other applications, could lead to an inexpensive way to digitize writing. They’re presenting their work this week at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.”

ACRL TechConnect: Introducing Omeka S

ACRL TechConnect: Introducing Omeka S . “My library has used Omeka as part of our suite of platforms for creating digital collections and exhibits for many years now. It’s easy to administer and use, and many of our students, particularly in history or digital humanities, learn how to create exhibits with it in class or have experience with it from other institutions, which makes it a good solution for student projects. This creates challenges, however, since it’s been difficult to have multiple sites or distributed administration…. This problem goes away with Omeka S, which is the new and completely rebuilt Omeka.”

Northeastern: Five Years After Attack, Boston Marathon Digital Archivists Find Healing In Storytelling

Northeastern: Five Years After Attack, Boston Marathon Digital Archivists Find Healing In Storytelling. “Five years on, revisiting the digital archive created after the Boston Marathon bombing is still part of the healing process for those who curated it. ‘It feels like you’re touching a wound,’ said Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, one of the archive’s primary investigators. ‘It’s painful. While there are a lot of wonderful stories that came out of that event—stories of people helping each other, of first responders saving lives—you can still feel that visceral experience of shock, pain, grieving, and loss that people encountered.'”

Climate Change and the Stories We Tell: The Making of a Collaborative Digital Archive in Rural Maine (Imagining America)

Imagining America: Climate Change and the Stories We Tell: The Making of a Collaborative Digital Archive in Rural Maine. “Climate change is one of the most important issues facing humanity. But the very nature of this phenomenon—the physical and temporal scale at which it plays out, the specificity of the scientific language often used to describe it, and the complex set of interests already shaping this discourse—make it a difficult phenomenon to discuss. Scientific papers about climate change tend to be jargon-heavy and largely incomprehensible to the general public. Meanwhile, apocalyptic narratives like those popularized in film and fiction often foster fear, despondency, and withdrawal from the civic sphere (Swyngedouw 2010). Journalistic attempts to cover the topic in a newsworthy manner often end up sounding repetitive, as each month leads to the shattering of yet another climate-related record. Finally, climate change is a deeply polarizing issue, with ‘believers’ and ‘nonbelievers’ often splitting along party lines (Stoknes 2015). The question remains: How can we communicate ongoing environmental transformations in a manner that is engaging and factually accurate, urgent and memorable, pointed and capable of speaking to people of varied political persuasions?”

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: So now you have digital data… (part 3 of 7)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: So now you have digital data… (part 3 of 7). “So now you have digital data… Great! But what to do? Regardless of what your data are (sometimes it’s just pictures and documents and notes, sometimes it’s numbers and metadata), storage, organization, and management can get complicated.”

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7 (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7. “The first step in creating an electronic copy of an analog (non-digital) document is usually scanning it to create a digitized image (for example, a .pdf or a .jpg). Scanning a document is like taking an electronic photograph of it–now it’s in a file format that can be saved to a computer, uploaded to the Internet, or shared in an e-mail. In some cases, such as when you are digitizing a film photograph, a high-quality digital image is all you need. But in the case of textual documents, a digital image is often insufficient, or at least inconvenient.”