Climate Change and the Stories We Tell: The Making of a Collaborative Digital Archive in Rural Maine (Imagining America)

Imagining America: Climate Change and the Stories We Tell: The Making of a Collaborative Digital Archive in Rural Maine. “Climate change is one of the most important issues facing humanity. But the very nature of this phenomenon—the physical and temporal scale at which it plays out, the specificity of the scientific language often used to describe it, and the complex set of interests already shaping this discourse—make it a difficult phenomenon to discuss. Scientific papers about climate change tend to be jargon-heavy and largely incomprehensible to the general public. Meanwhile, apocalyptic narratives like those popularized in film and fiction often foster fear, despondency, and withdrawal from the civic sphere (Swyngedouw 2010). Journalistic attempts to cover the topic in a newsworthy manner often end up sounding repetitive, as each month leads to the shattering of yet another climate-related record. Finally, climate change is a deeply polarizing issue, with ‘believers’ and ‘nonbelievers’ often splitting along party lines (Stoknes 2015). The question remains: How can we communicate ongoing environmental transformations in a manner that is engaging and factually accurate, urgent and memorable, pointed and capable of speaking to people of varied political persuasions?”

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: So now you have digital data… (part 3 of 7)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: So now you have digital data… (part 3 of 7). “So now you have digital data… Great! But what to do? Regardless of what your data are (sometimes it’s just pictures and documents and notes, sometimes it’s numbers and metadata), storage, organization, and management can get complicated.”

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7 (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7. “The first step in creating an electronic copy of an analog (non-digital) document is usually scanning it to create a digitized image (for example, a .pdf or a .jpg). Scanning a document is like taking an electronic photograph of it–now it’s in a file format that can be saved to a computer, uploaded to the Internet, or shared in an e-mail. In some cases, such as when you are digitizing a film photograph, a high-quality digital image is all you need. But in the case of textual documents, a digital image is often insufficient, or at least inconvenient.”

New Year, New You: A Digital Scholarship Guide (in seven parts!) (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Year, New You: A Digital Scholarship Guide (in seven parts!). “To get 2018 going in a positive digital direction, we are releasing a guide for working with digital resources. Every Wednesday for the next seven weeks a new part of the guide will be released on The Signal. The guide covers what digital archives and digital humanities are trying to achieve, how to create digital documents, metadata and text-encoding, digital content and citation management, data cleaning methods, an introduction to working in the command line, text and visual analysis tools and techniques, and a list of people, blogs, and digital scholarship labs to follow to learn more about the topic. If you need all of this information immediately, feel free to binge on the full guide, available now in PDF. (No spoilers!)”

Indiana University Scholarworks: Archiving Archaeological Research Data – On Requirements, Objectives and First Experiences from a German Respectively Saxon Point of View

Indiana University Scholarworks: Archiving Archaeological Research Data – On Requirements, Objectives and First Experiences from a German Respectively Saxon Point of View. “Preserving digital data over long times is an ambitious task. While most analogue documents are best stored without touching them, digital data need permanent care and curation. Regarding some differences between analogue and digital data – lifecycle, complexity, functionality and so on – it can be realized, that digital archiving is a new challenge. This paper will deal with requirements and objectives on archiving archaeological research data, as discussed in a working group of the Association of State Archaeologists in Germany (Verband der Landesarchäologen in Deutschland – VLA). Interesting themes of that discussions were “Archive Objectives”, “Worthiness of Archiving”, “Suitability of Archiving” and “Future Use Scenarios”. This paper will also deal with first experiences in building up a digital archive for archaeological research data in Saxony.”

ABC Online: Battling with old technology to keep State Library of WA’s digital archive alive

ABC Online (Australia): Battling with old technology to keep State Library of WA’s digital archive alive. “We usually think of digital records as accessible, up to date and easy to store. But for the preservation staff at the State Library of Western Australia, saving this type of content has proven far trickier than simply keeping mildew away from books.”

Making the Case: Establishing a Digital Archive at the Associated Press (Preservica Webinar on 12/12)

Bopping around my Google Alerts, I found this notification on what sounds like a very interesting webinar from Preservica: “Making the Case: Establishing a Digital Archive at the Associated Press”. It’s on December 12 at 10AM EST (3PM GST). From the page: “Featuring a conversation with Valerie Komor, Director of the Associated Press Corporate Archives, this webinar focuses on how she and her team built the business case for a digital preservation system and engaged stakeholders to identify and prioritize information assets for preservation based on value and risk. Valerie will share highlights on their three year journey to establish and sustain a digital archive, and offer insights into how collaboration with records creators and researchers is changing in the digital age.” As far as I can tell (and I registered) it’s free.