Lifehacker: How to Digitize Vinyl Records Without a Record Player

Lifehacker: How to Digitize Vinyl Records Without a Record Player. “Digitizing vinyl is a lot harder than ripping a CD. An external CD drive costs $26 on Amazon; a record player with a digital output costs $250 or more. Plus you have to use special software, specify the beginning and end of each track, write out all the metadata, and make sure the record plays smoothly. Or you can get someone else to do it for you. Here’s how.” And if you DO have a turntable and you want to rip a LOT of records, let me reup DJ Kippax’s crazy deep dive on album ripping.

DJ Kippax: How to bulk rip lots of vinyl (and not go crazy)

DJ Kippax: How to bulk rip lots of vinyl (and not go crazy). “This record ripping guide is useful even if you’re not a DJ. The methods I outline will work for anyone who has the problem of digitising a large collection of filthy vinyls whilst trying maintain good sound quality.” A super deep dive from Mr. Kippax.

The Gadgeteer: ScanMyPhotos photo scanning service review

The Gadgeteer: ScanMyPhotos photo scanning service review. “When we wanted to save a moment in time before the days of smartphones, we captured a picture with an actual camera. Inside the camera was a roll of film which had to be dropped off at a drug store or camera store to be developed. A few days later you’d stop at the store and pick up the processed pictures. If you’re old enough, you probably have a few boxes of photos from days gone by collecting dust on a shelf. How can you ‘backup’ those images or share them on social media without manually scanning each individual photo? ScanMyPhotos is a service that will take care of the work of scanning your photos. Let’s take a look.”

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7 (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7. “The first step in creating an electronic copy of an analog (non-digital) document is usually scanning it to create a digitized image (for example, a .pdf or a .jpg). Scanning a document is like taking an electronic photograph of it–now it’s in a file format that can be saved to a computer, uploaded to the Internet, or shared in an e-mail. In some cases, such as when you are digitizing a film photograph, a high-quality digital image is all you need. But in the case of textual documents, a digital image is often insufficient, or at least inconvenient.”

Rwanda: Digitilisation of Gacaca Archives to Be Completed By June 2018 (AllAfrica)

All Africa: Rwanda: Digitilisation of Gacaca Archives to Be Completed By June 2018. “Work is being fast-tracked to ensure that the ongoing scanning and digitalisation of 63 million copies of Gacaca courts’s archives are completed in June next year. Dr Jean Damascène Bizimana, the Executive Secretary of the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) said this Tuesday as officials from CNLG and Aegis Trust, the British NGO which campaigns to prevent genocide worldwide, gave journalists a guided tour of the stores where they are kept at the Rwanda National Police headquarters in Kacyiru.”

Wired: The British Library is racing to save archived sounds from decay

Wired: The British Library is racing to save archived sounds from decay. “A Nazi radio archive with more than 4,000 discs that have never been played, a collection of Beijing street sounds from the 90s and the voice of Florence Nightingale are among the British Library’s six-and-a-half million sound recordings. The earliest are from the 1880s, recorded on wax cylinders that sit four storeys beneath the bustling streets of London, fighting off mould and decay. In a race against time before the most fragile recordings vanish forever, the archive is being digitised.”

National Post: It’s taking the RCMP longer than anticipated to digitize Canada’s national database of criminal records

National Post: It’s taking the RCMP longer than anticipated to digitize Canada’s national database of criminal records. “The RCMP says it will now need until 2020 to finish uploading nearly half-a-million backlogged files to a nationwide criminal-record database, despite previously saying the job would be done next year. Criminal justice experts say they are troubled by how much time it has taken the RCMP, which manages the database, to eliminate the backlog for a database that is relied upon not only by police officers, who use it to check suspects’ backgrounds, but also by employers and volunteer organizations who use it to vet job applicants and the courts who use it to make bail and sentencing decisions.”

Natural History Museum (UK): How Lego lends a hand in digitising 300 year old Herbarium books

Natural History Museum (UK): How Lego lends a hand in digitising 300 year old Herbarium books | Digital Collections Programme. “[Sir Hans] Sloane’s collections are the founding core of the Museum’s collections and occupy a central position in its (and the British Museum’s) history. Over 300+ years since his death his natural history collections have had mixed fortunes, with many mammal, bird and reptile specimens being lost or destroyed. His plant collections survived and are still housed in the Museum today. Some of this has been digitised by the Museum using a large-format camera with a digital scanner attachment. However, some volumes were completely unsuitable for this technique and require a different approach.” Fascinating “behind the scenes” look at digitizing unusual books and the ingenuity required.

PetaPixel: I Just Had 20,000 Slides Returned from Sports Illustrated

PetaPixel: I Just Had 20,000 Slides Returned from Sports Illustrated. “Here we are in 2017 and I am glad my obsession with keeping stuff carried over into my photography. This maniacal attitude combined with great advice I received early on from mentors like Neil Leifer taught me to fight like hell to keep my copyright and retain ownership and control of my images. In the old days, this meant my chromes — my 35mm color transparencies. There is nothing like a properly exposed, sharp, color slide viewed on a light table through a Schneider loupe. These magical squares are valuable, that’s why clients always tried to keep them.”

Digital Trends: The Vinyl Recorder App Lets You Rip Your Favorite Analog Tunes To Your Phone

Digital Trends: The Vinyl Recorder App Lets You Rip Your Favorite Analog Tunes To Your Phone. “All listeners need is a USB turntable and a micro-USB cable to attach it to their phone, at which point they simply load the Vinyl Recorder app and press record. An integration with Gracenote means that after a few seconds, the service will identify the song from its online database, then add information to your digital vinyl rip — including the artist name, song title, album title, album artwork, and genre tags.”

Digital Trends: Play Any Video On Any Device With The Best Free Video Converters

Digital Trends: Play Any Video On Any Device With The Best Free Video Converters
. “What good is having a super-compressed MPEG4 video if you can’t watch it on whatever device you choose? Sure, that movie may look phenomenal in high-definition on your desktop — especially if you’ve opted for one of the best 4K monitors available — but it can be a pain to watch on your home console, tablet, or smartphone. Luckily, quality video converters have been around for several years, allowing users to convert their precious video footage into a number of desirable formats. Best of all, most of them are completely free.”

Delaware Online: UD digitizing thousands of Delaware newspapers

From Delaware Online: UD digitizing thousands of Delaware newspapers. “Newspapers are not meant to last forever, as librarians at the University of Delaware can tell you. They’re printed on low-cost, non-archival paper, which ages quickly and crumbles. The ink fades, making it difficult to read. The paper itself yellows. Newspapers are one the few chronicles of day-to-day history, and they are faulty, it turns out. Which is why the University of Delaware is working hard to preserve them before it is too late.”

Stanford University’s AV Artifact Atlas Moves to GitHub

Stanford’s AV Artifact Atlas has been moved to GitHub. From the home page (now on GitHub, natch): “Welcome to AV Artifact Atlas, a resource for identifying errors and anomalies in analog and digital video. AVAA is built for and by a community of professionals in the field of audiovisual archiving but useful for anyone working with av material. “