Philadelphia Inquirer: The FBI used a Philly protester’s Etsy profile, LinkedIn, and other internet history to charge her with setting police cars ablaze

Philadelphia Inquirer: The FBI used a Philly protester’s Etsy profile, LinkedIn, and other internet history to charge her with setting police cars ablaze. “More than two weeks after that climactic May 30 moment, federal authorities say they’ve identified the arsonist as 33-year-old Philadelphia massage therapist Lore Elisabeth Blumenthal by following the intricate trail of bread crumbs she left through her social media history and online shopping patterns over the years. The path took agents from Instagram, where amateur photographers also captured shots of the masked arsonist, to an Etsy shop that sold the distinctive T-shirt the woman was wearing in the video. It led investigators to her LinkedIn page, to her profile on the fashion website Poshmark, and eventually to her doorstep in Germantown.”

Motherboard: We Built a Database of Over 500 iPhones Cops Have Tried to Unlock

Motherboard: We Built a Database of Over 500 iPhones Cops Have Tried to Unlock. “One of the top level findings of Motherboard’s dataset is that many law enforcement agencies and officials can not reliably access data stored on iPhones. Whether that’s due to a device having too strong a passcode, the phone being damaged, an unlocking capability not being available at that specific point in time, or a particular agency not having access to advanced forensic technology itself, Motherboard found many cases where investigators were not able to extract data from iPhones, at least according to the search warrants.”

EurekAlert: New research uses physiological cues to distinguish computer-generated faces from human ones

EurekAlert: New research uses physiological cues to distinguish computer-generated faces from human ones. “‘Digital human face detection in video sequences via a physiological signal analysis,’ a paper published today in the Journal of Electronic Imaging (JEI), presents a viable, innovative way to discern between natural humans (NAT) and CG faces within the context of multimedia forensics, using individuals’ heart rate as the discriminating feature.”

Trib Live: CMU researchers develop tool to pinpoint source of gunshots using smartphone videos

Trib Live: CMU researchers develop tool to pinpoint source of gunshots using smartphone videos. “A tool developed at Carnegie Mellon University to determine the location of gunshots correctly pinpointed where the shots came from in the 2017 mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip, CMU researchers said.”

Mashable: Company says it can extract email addresses and passwords from locked iPhones

Mashable: Company says it can extract email addresses and passwords from locked iPhones. “A Russia-based cybersecurity company said it found a new way into your locked iPhone. Elcomsoft, which creates digital forensic software for governments and law enforcement agencies, said on Friday that its iOS Forensic Toolkit can now extract some data from locked iPhones and iPads in Before First Unlock (BFU) mode.”

Phys .org: Here’s what police know about digital evidence

Phys .org: Here’s what police know about digital evidence. “In today’s criminal justice system, a Play Station and iPhone are just as important pieces of evidence as eyewitness accounts. Yet, there isn’t a strong understanding as to how police officers identify digital evidence—everything from a laptop to a smart television—in the field.”

New York Times: Imagine Being on Trial. With Exonerating Evidence Trapped on Your Phone.

The New York Times: Imagine Being on Trial. With Exonerating Evidence Trapped on Your Phone.. “In America, citizens accused of crimes are supposed to have an advantage. The burden of proof is on prosecutors, and the government must turn over all its evidence to defendants, who have no reciprocal obligation. In practice, of course — and especially when defendants don’t have a lot of money — the government has the edge. Investigators can issue subpoenas, compel testimony and pressure defendants into pleas. Today, one way in which the deck is stacked against defendants involves technology.”

IFL Science: Twitter Thread On How To Delete Yourself From The Internet Goes Viral

IFL Science: Twitter Thread On How To Delete Yourself From The Internet Goes Viral. “Whether you’re a spy, someone worried about data privacy and security, or just a regular person with a backlog of terrible memes, it may have crossed your mind that you might one day want to delete every last trace of yourself from the Internet. It would appear you are not alone, as a Twitter thread explaining precisely how to delete yourself from 99 percent of the Internet has gone mega-viral.”

Speech2Face: A neural network that “imagines” faces from hearing voices. Is it too soon to worry about ethnic profiling? (Packt)

Packt: Speech2Face: A neural network that “imagines” faces from hearing voices. Is it too soon to worry about ethnic profiling?. “The researchers designed and trained a neural network which uses millions of natural Internet/YouTube videos of people speaking. During training, they demonstrated that the model learns voice-face correlations that allows it to produce images that capture various physical attributes of the speakers such as age, gender, and ethnicity.”

EurekAlert: An all-in-one cyber toolkit for criminal investigations

EurekAlert: An all-in-one cyber toolkit for criminal investigations . “FileTSAR is available free to law enforcement. The project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. The Purdue toolkit brings together in one complete package the top open source investigative tools used by digital forensic law enforcement teams at the local, state, national and global levels.”

Nieman Lab: How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes

Nieman Lab: How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes. “We at The Wall Street Journal are taking this threat seriously and have launched an internal deepfakes task force led by the Ethics & Standards and the Research & Development teams. This group, the WSJ Media Forensics Committee, is comprised of video, photo, visuals, research, platform, and news editors who have been trained in deepfake detection. Beyond this core effort, we’re hosting training seminars with reporters, developing newsroom guides, and collaborating with academic institutions such as Cornell Tech to identify ways technology can be used to combat this problem.”

EurekAlert: Can we trust digital forensic evidence?

EurekAlert: Can we trust digital forensic evidence? . “Digital forensics is the recovery and investigation of digital devices and digital materials, often related to serious crimes, such as terrorism and murder, but also more localised issues within the workplace such as employee misconduct and cyber bullying.New research at the University of York examining digital forensic laboratories in England and Wales has shown that evidence of the accuracy of digital forensic methods may be missing from the regulatory framework.”

Gizmodo: How to Look Up Your Oldest Activity on Google, Facebook, Netflix, and more

Gizmodo: How to Look Up Your Oldest Activity on Google, Facebook, Netflix, and more . “You might be familiar with Facebook regularly throwing heartwarming (or heartbreaking) memories in your face every once in a while, but if you want to take a serious dive into your digital past,. Here’s a guide to dredging into your your digital past on some of the most popular apps and services out there.”

NIST: Database of Software “Fingerprints” Expands to Include Computer Games

NIST: Database of Software “Fingerprints” Expands to Include Computer Games. “One of the largest software libraries in the world just grew larger. The National Software Reference Library (NSRL), which archives copies of the world’s most widely installed software titles, has expanded to include computer game software from three popular PC gaming distribution platforms—Steam, Origin and Blizzard.”