Europeana Pro: Get inspired by examples of digital storytelling in action

Europenana Pro: Get inspired by examples of digital storytelling in action. “This month, Europeana and the Heritage Lab are running the digital storytelling festival, encouraging people to tell stories with digital cultural heritage. Members of the Europeana Communicators Community Steering Group share examples of the stories told online and in digital formats that excite them – and can inspire you!”

University of Melbourne: The Hidden Stories In Australia’s Cultural Data

University of Melbourne: The Hidden Stories In Australia’s Cultural Data. “The widespread digitisation of art and culture means data science is now being used to reveal fresh cultural stories and connections that would otherwise have been impossible to uncover. Researchers are detecting surprising trends, telling the micro-biographical histories of artists and asking new questions about the connection between the environment, the economy, and Australia’s arts and cultural life.”

University of Wyoming: UW Joins Buffalo Bill Center, UK Institutions in Digital Humanities Project

University of Wyoming: UW Joins Buffalo Bill Center, UK Institutions in Digital Humanities Project . “Researchers at the University of Wyoming and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West have joined international colleagues in Wales in a new project aimed at developing digital tools to analyze historical book illustrations to gain a more thorough understanding of history. Using a nearly $500,000 grant from the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities and the United Kingdom’s Arts and Humanities Research Council, the team will use cutting-edge computing techniques to uncover hidden histories contained in the collections of several cultural institutions.”

Open and Engaged 2021: Understanding the Impact of Open in the Arts and Humanities Beyond the University (British Library)

British Library: Open and Engaged 2021: Understanding the Impact of Open in the Arts and Humanities Beyond the University. “In Higher Education contexts, discussions around openness are often focused on the pathways to make publications, data or cultural objects openly available online. It is often not known what impact open resources can have for various communities beyond the research community. The speakers at Open and Engaged 2021 will explore the different impacts that open resources can have on people. They will seek to question how openness enhances the ability to engage with communities, how projects can be sustainable and make positive changes in the long-term, as well as some of the downsides to current approaches to open engagement.”

Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud: How We’re Working with Researchers (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud: How We’re Working with Researchers. “As we recently announced, we are working with three digital humanities researchers as part of the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud (CCHC) initiative, where we are exploring how the Library could make its digital collections available as data via cloud infrastructure. Our complex working relationship with these researchers is central to the initiative, and we appreciate all the ways we are getting to learn along with them.”

Virginia Tech: Researchers are pulling movements out of microfilm with digital history

Virginia Tech: Researchers are pulling movements out of microfilm with digital history. “Firsthand accounts and images of Black soldiers hold hidden chapters of U.S. history. Historians and computer scientists are harnessing technologies like virtual reality and AI to equip the public to immerse themselves in those perspectives, learn from them, and broaden historical dialogue.”

University of New Orleans: Literature Professor Jacinta Saffold Uses Digital Humanities Projects To Explore Black Peoples’ Influence on Pop Culture

University of New Orleans: Literature Professor Jacinta Saffold Uses Digital Humanities Projects To Explore Black Peoples’ Influence on Pop Culture. “When the coronavirus pandemic forced courses to be delivered online, University of New Orleans African American literature professor Jacinta Saffold created a research project aimed at keeping her students engaged while also conducting original research…. The result was a digital humanities dataset called, ‘The Hype Williams Effect Project,’ a literary compilation that helps document Black people’s influence on contemporary popular culture via the expansive career of hip hop music video director Harold ‘Hype’ Williams.” Professor Saffold is also working on ‘The Essence Book Project’ digital archive.

MIT: Online hub for research and teaching brings digital humanities to the fore

MIT: Online hub for research and teaching brings digital humanities to the fore. “… a new collaboration between the MIT Programs in Digital Humanities (DH Lab) and the MIT Libraries is helping foster relationships among scholars with intersecting interests in computational culture. Since September 2020, the DH Lab has partnered with the libraries to present Digital Teaching and Research Collaborative Sessions, a weekly series of virtual events that provide a regular, informal space for faculty and researchers to connect with DH Lab staff, MIT librarians, and with one another. Recordings of these sessions are now available on the MIT Libraries’ YouTube channel.”

KrAsia: [Tuning In] Peter Bol on creating the China Biological Database and the power of digital humanities

New-to-me, from KrAsia: [Tuning In] Peter Bol on creating the China Biological Database and the power of digital humanities . “Professor Bol directs the China Biographical Database project, which is maintained by Harvard University, Academia Sinica, and Peking University. This online relational database currently contains some 350,000 historical figures and is being expanded to include all biographical data in China’s historical records from the last 2,000 years.”

Internet Archive Blog: Can You Help us Make the 19th Century Searchable?

Internet Archive Blog: Can You Help us Make the 19th Century Searchable?. “What we need is ‘Culture Tech’ (a riff on fintech, or biotech) and Culture Techies to work on important and useful projects–the things we need, but are probably not going to get gushers of private equity interest to fund. There are thousands of professionals taking on similar challenges in the field of digital humanities and we want to complement their work with industrial-scale tech that we can apply to cultural heritage materials.”

University of Texas at Austin: Humanity and Google Sheets

University of Texas at Austin: Humanity and Google Sheets. “When one of Professor Julie Hardwick’s students recently got an internship at a local tech company, she was asked to compare the company’s benefits package with those of 60 competitors. Initially overwhelmed, she then thought, ‘I’m going to get my Google Sheet, get my evidence, look for patterns, get my data visualization, and then present an interpretation.’ This spreadsheet-based approach might seem like the plan of a good business student, but in fact, she was harkening to a different class. “

UNC Greensboro: Digital Humanities Project Receives $325,000 NEH Grant

UNC Greensboro: Digital Humanities Project Receives $325,000 NEH Grant. “The funding will be used to further develop MassMine, an interdisciplinary tool that supports the collection of data from digital networks. Beveridge, assistant professor of digital rhetoric in the Dept. of English, and his colleague Dr. Nicholas Van Horn, assistant professor at Capital University, created the software in 2014 to address accessibility issues for researching social networks in the humanities.”

Wheat, wine and wool: What old account statements reveal (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: Wheat, wine and wool: What old account statements reveal. “The aim of the project is to investigate the Egyptian temple economy from sources that are ‘rich in content, difficult, fragile at first glance, but then uniquely rich in detail’, as [Professor Martin Andreas] Stadler says. At the same time, they will being publication of an online platform with the edition of around 40 representative texts. Under the keyword “Digital Humanities”, ancient historians and Egyptologists will be provided with new sources that will put the knowledge about the economic life of Egyptian temples in the Roman Empire on a new footing. “

Princeton: Princeton Prosody Archive Launches a Bold New Site

Princeton: Princeton Prosody Archive Launches a Bold New Site. “The thousands of digitized works in the Princeton Prosody Archive are now publicly available on the archive’s new and improved website. The searchable site means centuries’ worth of texts are right at your fingertips.” After I went and looked up prosody, I checked out the Princeton Prosody Archive. It describes itself this way: “Welcome to the Princeton Prosody Archive, a full-text searchable database of thousands of digitized books published between 1570 and 1923. The Archive collects historical documents and highlights discourses about the study of language, the study of poetry, and where and how these intersect and diverge.”

KQED: How to Teach Students Historical Inquiry Through Media Literacy And Critical Thinking

KQED: How to Teach Students Historical Inquiry Through Media Literacy And Critical Thinking. “Many students are not good at evaluating the credibility of what they see and read online according to a now-famous Stanford study that was released just after the 2016 election. And while it’s true that 82 percent of middle schoolers couldn’t tell the difference between a native advertisement and a news article, neither could 59 percent of adults in a study conducted by the advertising industry. Sam Wineburg, the Stanford professor who led the middle school study, is worried that everyone is ‘profoundly confused’ right now and that schools aren’t doing enough to teach students the skills they need to be effective citizens and digital consumers.”