ZDNet: Yahoo Groups to shut down for good on December 15, 2020

ZDNet: Yahoo Groups to shut down for good on December 15, 2020. “Yahoo Groups, one of the last vestiges of the old Yahoo web properties, will shut down on December 15, 2020, when Verizon plans to take the groups.yahoo.com website offline for good.” Thanks to Lucas L. for the heads-up.

BetaNews: Cloudflare and the Internet Archive are working together to help make the web more reliable

BetaNews: Cloudflare and the Internet Archive are working together to help make the web more reliable. “The Wayback Machine has been archiving much of the web for over 20 years now and has cached 468 billion pages to date, with more than a billion new URLs being added every day. As part of this new tie up, sites that make use of Cloudflare’s Always Online service will have their content automatically archived, and if the original host isn’t available, then the Internet Archive will step in to provide the pages.”

Out of View: After Public Outcry, CDC Adds Hospital Data Back to Its Website — for Now (ProPublica)

ProPublica: Out of View: After Public Outcry, CDC Adds Hospital Data Back to Its Website — for Now. “Hospitalization data is important to understanding the coronavirus’s spread and impact. But after the Trump administration changed its reporting rules, the CDC removed the data from its site, and only added it back after a public outcry.”

CNBC: Coronavirus data has already disappeared after Trump administration shifted control from CDC

CNBC: Coronavirus data has already disappeared after Trump administration shifted control from CDC. “Previously public data has already disappeared from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website after the Trump administration quietly shifted control of the information to the Department of Health and Human Services.” Regular readers of ResearchBuzz know that the Trump administration has a long history of disappearing data from government Web sites…

MIT Technology Review: The race to save the first draft of coronavirus history from internet oblivion

MIT Technology Review: The race to save the first draft of coronavirus history from internet oblivion. “According to Brewster Kahle, the Internet Archive’s founder, his organization is already collecting about 1 billion URLs a day across the web. Archiving the pandemic means trying to identify and collect the pages their ordinary efforts might otherwise overlook, relying on a network of library professionals and members of the public: local and international public health pages, petitions, resources for medical professionals trying to fight covid-19, and accounts from those who have had the virus. It’s not easy. ‘The average life of a web page is only 100 days before it’s changed or deleted,’ he says.

Washington Post: USDA reposts animal welfare records it purged from its website in 2017

Washington Post: USDA reposts animal welfare records it purged from its website in 2017. “Tuesday’s move made available unredacted reports for nearly 10,000 zoos, circuses, breeders, research labs and Tennessee walking horse shows that were publicly available on Jan. 30, 2017 — days before they were purged — as well as those generated since, the department said. The reports, based on unannounced inspections, can be used by the agency to build cases against facilities that violate animal welfare regulations, and animal protection groups had long used them to call attention to operations they said treated animals inhumanely.”

Reminder: You have slightly longer to download data from Yahoo Groups — but you still need to move fast! (BetaNews)

BetaNews: Reminder: You have slightly longer to download data from Yahoo Groups — but you still need to move fast!. “The first deadline issued by Yahoo was December 14. This has come and gone, and the new deadline — unless there are any further extensions — is the end of this month. January 31 is just two-and-a-half weeks away, so if you’ve been putting off making a request for a data download, you really need to get moving.”

ARRL: Yahoo Groups Shutdown has Ham Radio Interest Groups Seeking to Save Content

ARRL: Yahoo Groups Shutdown has Ham Radio Interest Groups Seeking to Save Content. “Web application developer Andy Majot, K5QO, of Sellersburg, Indiana, took the initiative to download archives of Yahoo Groups devoted to individual ham radio gear and uploaded them to his personal website. ‘I hope to have them hosted in perpetuity for future hams to use,’ Majot told ARRL. ‘It should be noted that I backed up groups regardless of whether they are living on in other platforms; I wanted to snapshot the groups as they were on Yahoo prior to their deletion.'”

Salon: Federal Toxmap shutters, raising the ire of pollution researchers

Salon: Federal Toxmap shutters, raising the ire of pollution researchers. “Earlier this year, with little explanation, the NLM announced that it would be ‘retiring’ the Toxmap website on Dec. 16, 2019. The library did not respond directly to queries on Monday about what was meant by “retiring,” but by Tuesday morning, the Toxmap website had been taken down and visitors to the former URL were met with a message acknowledging the closure and pointing visitors to other potential sources of information.” Toxmap was an online app that aggregated pollution data from government agencies.

Search Engine Journal: Yahoo Extends Deadline for Deletion of Yahoo Groups Data

Search Engine Journal: Yahoo Extends Deadline for Deletion of Yahoo Groups Data. “Yahoo is extending the date that it plans to delete all Yahoo Groups data, which was originally scheduled to happen this week. It was announced in October that all content on Yahoo Groups would be deleted by December 14. Now, Yahoo says it will not delete Groups data until January 31, 2020.”

Japan Times: Japanese court orders Google to erase search results on man’s arrest

Japan Times: Japanese court orders Google to erase search results on man’s arrest. “A court ordered Google Inc. on Thursday to erase news search results about an arrest of a man who claimed that showing information about the case that was later dropped was an invasion of privacy.”

NPR: Internet Historians Mourn Loss Of Cultural Record As Yahoo Prepares To Delete Groups

NPR: Internet Historians Mourn Loss Of Cultural Record As Yahoo Prepares To Delete Groups. “Yahoo Groups was once a place where people turned to find out what was happening in their communities. Then Facebook, Tumblr and other sites came along, making Yahoo Groups obsolete. So earlier this fall, Verizon, which now owns Yahoo, announced it will delete the archives of every Yahoo Group. That was supposed to happen this coming Saturday, but Verizon just announced it will extend the deadline until next month. NPR’s Neda Ulaby reports Internet historians and activists are scrambling.” I can’t find any other mentions of the deadline being extended at the moment, but I’ll keep an eye out. And why am I banging on about this? Because it’s going to happen again. And again. And again. And somebody has to care.

Boing Boing: GIF site Gfycat announces mass deletions, threatens Archive Team with lawsuit

Boing Boing: GIF site Gfycat announces mass deletions, threatens Archive Team with lawsuit. “Gfycat is a site that people upload GIFs to so they can share them with other people reliably. Used most conspicuously to host memes, clips from other media, and animated porn, it announced Wednesday that it was planning to permanently delete old, anonymously-posted images within days. Archive Team, a web preservation initiative coordinated by Jason Scott, set about archiving the site’s soon-to-vanish content. So Gfycat’s CEO, Dan McEleney, threatened it with a lawsuit, describing archival of the memes it hosts as a ‘denial of service attack’ and demanding compensation.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Preserving work in a time of vanishing archives

Columbia Journalism Review: Preserving work in a time of vanishing archives. “‘NOTHING DISAPPEARS ON THE INTERNET,’ people like to say, but journalists know that’s not necessarily true. Articles frequently disappear when online publications shutter or restructure. The internet is more like an Etch-a-Sketch than a stone engraving—over time, some marks endure, but the rest are swept from the canvas.”