Quartz: The White House’s website deleted the whole archive of its daily newsletters

Quartz: The White House’s website deleted the whole archive of its daily newsletters. “American citizens can get daily updates on the government directly from the White House’s ‘1600 Daily’ newsletter, which was launched in March 2017. The newsletter shares daily updates from the White House, together with a feed of positive news about Donald Trump’s administration… The past issues of the newsletters used to be accessible online, but those pages have been taken down in connection with a White House site redesign in December 2017, according to a report from the Web Integrity Project (WIP) of the Sunlight Foundation, a bipartisan organization focused on government accountability and transparency, released today (Sept. 13).”

New York Times: The Village Voice, a New York Icon, Closes

New York Times: The Village Voice, a New York Icon, Closes. “Staff members said they were not surprised that the end had come. The paper’s last editor in chief, Stephen Mooallem — the third top editor to serve under Mr. Barbey during his three-year tenure as owner — left in May and was not replaced. Some staff members will stay on to make the paper’s print archive digitally accessible; the rest will be out of a job at a time when the local news industry finds itself in crisis.”

Nieman Journalism Lab: We’re getting closer to the day when news apps and interactives can be easily preserved in perpetuity

Nieman Journalism Lab: We’re getting closer to the day when news apps and interactives can be easily preserved in perpetuity. “What if all the interactives a news organization ever made could be stored somewhere, accessible in the same form forever, even as the technologies people might use to access them change? That’s the dream, and that’s what a small team led by Katherine Boss, the librarian for journalism, media, culture and communication at New York University, and Meredith Broussard, assistant professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at NYU, are trying to get the news industry closer to.”

CogDogBlog: My 15 Year Old Web Tool Still Works (and was just updated)

CogDogBlog: My 15 Year Old Web Tool Still Works (and was just updated) . “Do you know what you were doing in 2003? What do you rely on? I know, I have My Blog, My Outboard Brain. On May 5, 2003, maybe at the time Harvard Blogs was just starting, I was messing around with this way to have a service that would make RSS Feed content be something mere mortals could include in their web pages. The first one was called RSStoJS and used a bit of PHP code found elsewhere (on a site that is gone now) to parse a feed, take a few options, and return a set of JavaScript write statements to put that content on another page.”

CBC: Server crash takes out rich digital archive at Memorial University

CBC: Server crash takes out rich digital archive at Memorial University. “As the start of the school year looms, Memorial University is trying to fix a server crash that made much of the Queen Elizabeth II library’s data inaccessible. The crash happened last month, during routine maintenance inside the library. So far, about half the data has been restored, said David Sorensen, MUN’s communications manager.”

Los Angeles Times: Judge orders L.A. Times to alter story about Glendale cop, sparking protest from newspaper

Los Angeles Times: Judge orders L.A. Times to alter story about Glendale cop, sparking protest from newspaper. “A federal judge on Saturday ordered the Los Angeles Times to remove information from an article that described a plea agreement between prosecutors and a Glendale police detective accused of working with the Mexican Mafia, a move the newspaper decried as highly unusual and unconstitutional. The agreement was supposed to have been filed under seal, but it was mistakenly made available on PACER, a public online database for federal court documents.”

Observer: Gawker Domain & Archive Is Finally Up For Auction Next Week. Who Might Win, and Why?

Observer: Gawker Domain & Archive Is Finally Up For Auction Next Week. Who Might Win, and Why? . “The auction in the offices of Ropes & Gray LLP in New York City for the remains of Gawker—which include more than 50 domain names, an archive of some 200,000 articles, a handful of social media accounts with roughly 2 million combined followers, the copyright to a book published in 2007, Gawker’s trademarks and some miscellaneous sub-blogs—will determine what’s to become of the fallen blogging powerhouse. Will it be purchased as some kind of relic of a bygone era of the internet? Possessed by a philanthropist or a sworn enemy? Will an upstart publisher try to turn it into something new? Will a major media empire buy it and try to put flesh back on the bones and revive the corpse?”