Engadget: Google and PBS launch a media literacy program to combat misinformation

Engadget: Google and PBS launch a media literacy program to combat misinformation. “Over the past few years, Google has been trying to repair its reputation as a source for disinformation by launching multiple programs, particularly the Google News Initiative (GNI). Now, the company has teamed with PBS Student Report Labs (SRL) and other journalism organizations on programs designed to strengthen media literacy for students, educators and the public.”

World Teachers Day: Commission launches tool to support primary and secondary teachers in using digital technologies (European Commission)

European Commission: World Teachers Day: Commission launches tool to support primary and secondary teachers in using digital technologies. “To mark World Teachers Day, the Commission is launching a new online tool for teachers to reflect on how they use digital technologies in their teaching activities. Based on a series of questions, the tool, ‘SELFIEforTEACHERS’ can help them assess their digital competences and identify where they need further training and support.”

University of Buffalo: UB, partners awarded $750,000 to fight online disinformation

University at Buffalo: UB, partners awarded $750,000 to fight online disinformation. “The project — titled A Disinformation Range to Improve User Awareness and Resilience to Online Disinformation — centers on developing a suite of digital literacy tools, as well as advanced educational techniques, that aim to reduce the harmful effects of online disinformation. Researchers plan to have a prototype ready in June, which they will share with senior citizens and teenagers, two groups particularly susceptible to online disinformation, according to a growing body of research.”

Firstpost: How heavy internet usage and poor digital literacy made India world’s top source of misinformation on COVID-19

Firstpost: How heavy internet usage and poor digital literacy made India world’s top source of misinformation on COVID-19. “‘Lemon juice up the nose will kill Coronavirus.’ ‘Keeping bundles of cloves, cardamom, camphor and mace in the pocket keeps keep Coronavirus at bay.’ ‘The COVID-19 vaccine generates magnetic properties in the human body.’ Misinformation such as the statements above and many more like these have been spread around the country repeatedly, leading India to become the biggest source of COVID-19 misinformation, as per a study published in Sage’s International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions journal.”

Google is goodish: An information literacy course designed to teach users why google may not always be the best place to search for evidence (Health Information and Libraries Journal)

Health Information and Libraries Journal: Google is goodish: An information literacy course designed to teach users why google may not always be the best place to search for evidence. “This article describes a course that was developed in response to health sector and local authority workers being reliant on Google and using it for their information needs regardless of whether it was the best place to search. The methodology for developing and structuring the course is explored, including details of the content included. The author concludes by asserting that teaching users about the effective use of Google is an important part of user education.”

Indiana University Bloomington: Choi part of IMLS grant to develop AI literacy program for youth in underserved communities

Indiana University Bloomington: Choi part of IMLS grant to develop AI literacy program for youth in underserved communities. “Kahyun Choi, an assistant professor of information and library science at the Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, has been awarded a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to develop an artificial intelligence literacy program for youth in underserved communities.”

“No, nothing will be fine” — but could these misinformation games help at least a little? (NiemanLab)

NiemanLab: “No, nothing will be fine” — but could these misinformation games help at least a little?. “In the span of a decade, we’ve gone from a model where most people accessed information through trusted intermediaries, such as newspapers or the evening news, to now getting it through social media, he said. But that world is structured so that inaccurate information can become popular very easily and then ranking algorithms boost it even further. And platforms are constantly changing the rules and tweaking their secret algorithms, said [Professor Filippo] Menczer.”

Misplaced trust: When trust in science fosters pseudoscience (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: Misplaced trust: When trust in science fosters pseudoscience. “A new study finds that people who trust science are more likely to believe and disseminate false claims containing scientific references than people who do not trust science. Reminding people of the value of critical evaluation reduces belief in false claims, but reminding them of the value of trusting science does not.”

The Conversation: Low- and middle-income countries lack access to big data analysis – here’s how to fill the gap

The Conversation: Low- and middle-income countries lack access to big data analysis – here’s how to fill the gap . “We are two mathematicians at the University of Colorado Boulder and are part of a project called the Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Statistical Analysis that is working to develop statistical infrastructure across the world. The goal of the program is to help build data science infrastructure in developing nations. In 10 countries and counting, we have started ‘stat labs’ – academic centers that train young statisticians to collaborate on important local statistics projects.”

Data Literacy in Government: How Are Agencies Enhancing Data Skills? (FedTech)

FedTech: Data Literacy in Government: How Are Agencies Enhancing Data Skills?. “Data literacy is now a common buzzword, spurred by the publication of the Federal Data Strategy 2020 Action Plan last year and the growing empowerment of chief data officers in the government. The document outlines a multiyear, holistic approach to government information that includes building a culture that values data, encouraging strong management and protection and promoting its efficient and appropriate use.”

Notre Dame News: Artificial intelligence tool could increase patient health literacy, study shows

Notre Dame News: Artificial intelligence tool could increase patient health literacy, study shows. “University of Notre Dame researcher John Lalor, an assistant professor of information technology, analytics and operations at the Mendoza College of Business, is part of a team working on a web-based natural language processing system that could increase the health literacy of patients who access their records through a patient portal. NoteAid, a project based at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, conveniently translates medical jargon for health care consumers.”

New York Times: Five Tech Commandments to a Safer Digital Life

New York Times: Five Tech Commandments to a Safer Digital Life. “Tech is always changing, and so is the way we use it. That means we are always finding new ways to let our guard down for bad actors to snoop on our data. Remember when you shared your address book with that trendy new app? Or when you posted photos on social networks? Those actions may all pose consequences that weaken security for ourselves and the people we care about.”