EdSurge: Teaching ‘Digital Native’ College Students Who Understand TikTok — But Not Microsoft Excel

EdSurge: Teaching ‘Digital Native’ College Students Who Understand TikTok — But Not Microsoft Excel. “Though today’s young people have gained a reputation as ‘digital natives,’ that doesn’t always translate to having the digital skills that are needed to succeed in college. In a 2021 survey from the College Innovation Network, 20 percent of students at four-year colleges said they struggled learning new edtech tools. And professors report that some students even have trouble using more fundamental computer programs to write essays or run calculations. So some colleges and instructors have started to think about how to help students get up to speed on their digital and technical skills.”

NBC News: Google is trying out ‘pre-bunking’ in an effort to counter misinformation

NBC News: Google is trying out ‘pre-bunking’ in an effort to counter misinformation. “In a study published Wednesday, social scientists from Cambridge University and Google reported on experiments where they showed 90-second cartoons to people in a lab setting and as advertisements on YouTube, explaining in simple, nonpartisan language some of the most common manipulation techniques. The cartoons succeeded in raising people’s awareness about common misinformation tactics such as scapegoating and creating a false choice, at least for a short time, they found.”

Unboxing videos on YouTube: What parents need to watch for (Brigham Young University)

Brigham Young University: Unboxing videos on YouTube: What parents need to watch for. “Videos of a child influencer opening a toy and demonstrating how to play with it have become wildly popular on YouTube, many garnering tens of millions of views from children around the globe. In fact, Walmart has a line of toys based on the reviews of a prominent kid YouTuber, Ryan Kaji of Ryan’s World. Unbeknownst to child viewers, however, is the fact that many of the toys shown in unboxing videos are paid for or provided by a brand, with the goal of influencing children.”

Poynter: MediaWise launches a free text message course to help voters prepare for the US midterms

Poynter: MediaWise launches a free text message course to help voters prepare for the US midterms. “With less than four months until the U.S. midterms, the social-first digital media literacy initiative MediaWise at the nonprofit Poynter Institute has launched Find Facts Fast, a free multimedia messaging service that teaches voters how to quickly discover reliable and trustworthy information online.”

World Bank: 70% of 10-Year-Olds now in Learning Poverty, Unable to Read and Understand a Simple Text

World Bank: 70% of 10-Year-Olds now in Learning Poverty, Unable to Read and Understand a Simple Text. “As a result of the worst shock to education and learning in recorded history, learning poverty has increased by a third in low- and middle-income countries, with an estimated 70% of 10-year-olds unable to understand a simple written text, according to a new report published today by the World Bank, UNESCO, UNICEF, UK government Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO), USAID, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.”

NiemanLab: Do browser extensions keep anyone away from fake news sites? Maybe a tiny bit

NiemanLab: Do browser extensions keep anyone away from fake news sites? Maybe a tiny bit. “As more companies and platforms adopt ways to figure out whether fact-checking, flagging questionable content, or some other form of alert works best to dissuade people from consuming misinformation, a new study finds that credibility ratings for news sites may offer a tiny ray of hope — if users actually use them.”

University of Exeter: Efforts to take fake news and misinformation in Africa must take account of the continent’s unique “pavement media”, study shows

University of Exeter: Efforts to take fake news and misinformation in Africa must take account of the continent’s unique “pavement media”, study shows. “The spread of fake news through ‘pavement media’ in Africa means the continent needs unique techniques to tackle the spread of misinformation, a new study says. Discussions about current affairs in marketplaces, places of worship, bars, and other social spaces, and through songs, sermons, and graffiti form a key part of the media ecosystem in Africa.”

edX: edX Awards $1 Million to Ten Partners Developing Free Courses on Essential Human Skills for the Virtual Age

edX: edX Awards $1 Million to Ten Partners Developing Free Courses on Essential Human Skills for the Virtual Age. “edX, a leading global online learning platform from 2U (Nasdaq: TWOU), today announced the 10 partner proposals selected to receive grants totaling $1 million to develop courses in Essential Human Skills for the Virtual Age. These courses and programs will be centered on essential human skills such as leadership, communication, and emotional intelligence that are prioritized during hiring and critical in an increasingly virtual world.”

The Conversation: Older Americans are given the wrong idea about online safety – here’s how to help them help themselves

The Conversation: Older Americans are given the wrong idea about online safety – here’s how to help them help themselves. “We have found that older adults attempt to draw on personal experience to develop strategies to reduce privacy violations and security threats. For the most part, they are successful at detecting threats by being on the lookout for activities they did not initiate – for example, an account they do not have. However, outside experts have an inordinate amount of influence on those with less perceived ability or experience with technology.”

CNN: Russian internet users are learning how to beat Putin’s internet crackdown

CNN: Russian internet users are learning how to beat Putin’s internet crackdown. “To defeat Russia’s internet censorship, many are turning to specialized circumvention technology that’s been widely used in other countries with restricted online freedoms, including China and Iran. Digital rights experts say Putin may have inadvertently sparked a massive, permanent shift in digital literacy in Russia that will work against the regime for years.”

Stanford News: Seven tips for spotting disinformation related to the Russia-Ukraine conflict

Stanford News: Seven tips for spotting disinformation related to the Russia-Ukraine conflict. “[Shelby] Grossman and her team are closely monitoring the narratives emerging on social media related to the crisis, including online propaganda from the Kremlin. A report of their initial findings published just two days before Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine. Grossman said that while they aren’t necessarily seeing new disinformation tactics, what’s new is how the tactics are being applied.”

The Orion: Social media algorithm designed to be toxic

The Orion: Social media algorithm designed to be toxic. “With the number of social media users nearing 4 billion in 2022, it’s safe to say that these platforms are not going anywhere in spite of the damage they cause. Platforms should make an effort to be transparent about the true, altered nature of pictures and videos by providing a disclaimer. Sadly, it does not seem to be a likely possibility because it goes against the influencers that draw traffic and increase the site’s popularity. Therefore, it is up to users to educate themselves on the harmful effects of social media.”

Poynter: These college students created a new tool to bring digital media literacy training into classrooms everywhere

Poynter: These college students created a new tool to bring digital media literacy training into classrooms everywhere. “MediaWise and its Campus Correspondents have been working since 2020 to slow the spread of online misinformation. In 2022, the goal is to train at 100 diverse colleges and universities, and availability is now opening up for another 25 workshops…. To meet the program’s demand, this year’s small but mighty team of 11 Campus Correspondents took the most crucial lessons from their live workshops and produced one masterclass video.”

NiemanLab: Kids are falling victim to disinformation and conspiracy theories. What’s the best way to fix that?

NiemanLab: Kids are falling victim to disinformation and conspiracy theories. What’s the best way to fix that? . “Children, it turns out, are ripe targets for fake news. Age 14 is when kids often start believing in unproven conspiratorial ideas, according to a 2021 study in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology. Many teens also have trouble assessing the credibility of online information. In a 2016 study involving nearly 8,000 U.S. students, Stanford University researchers found that less than 20 percent of high schoolers seriously questioned spurious claims in social media, such as a Facebook post that said images of strange-looking flowers, supposedly near the site of a nuclear power plant accident in Japan, proved that dangerous radiation levels persisted in the area.”