Uncovered: 1,000 phrases that incorrectly trigger Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Uncovered: 1,000 phrases that incorrectly trigger Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant. “As Alexa, Google Home, Siri, and other voice assistants have become fixtures in millions of homes, privacy advocates have grown concerned that their near-constant listening to nearby conversations could pose more risk than benefit to users. New research suggests the privacy threat may be greater than previously thought.”

The Conversation: Domestic abusers use tech that connects as a weapon during coronavirus lockdowns

The Conversation: Domestic abusers use tech that connects as a weapon during coronavirus lockdowns. “The coronavirus pandemic has driven much of daily life – work, school, socializing – online. Unfortunately, perpetrators of violence against women and girls are also increasingly turning to technology in response to the pandemic.”

TIME: Going to a Protest? Here’s How to Protect Your Digital Privacy

TIME: Going to a Protest? Here’s How to Protect Your Digital Privacy. “Even as protesters turn to their smartphones as a means to record their experiences on the ground, those same devices can be used against them. Law enforcement groups have digital surveillance tools, like fake cell phone towers and facial recognition technology, that can be used to identify protestors and monitor their movements and communications. Furthermore, investigators and prosecutors have come to view suspects’ phones as potential treasure troves of information about them and their associates, setting up legal battles over personal technology and Americans’ Constitutional rights.”

OneZero: Google Purged Almost 1,000 Abusive ‘Creeperware’ Apps. Now Some Are Coming Back.

OneZero: Google Purged Almost 1,000 Abusive ‘Creeperware’ Apps. Now Some Are Coming Back.. “In June 2019, a group of cybersecurity researchers notified Google of more than 1,000 potentially malicious apps on the company’s Play Store that can be used to surveil, monitor, and harass users. Their findings, which have not previously been reported, eventually led to one of the largest ever mass removals of Android apps. Less than a year later, there are signs that the ‘creeperware,’ as the researchers called it, is returning.”

Protocol: Google Docs is being used as a protest tool. That could put the company in a tight spot.

Protocol: Google Docs is being used as a protest tool. That could put the company in a tight spot.. “A multitude of Google Docs and Sheets have sprung up coordinating donations to the cause and ways to demonstrate solidarity. Some are chaotically created lists of email addresses, links and other information, compiled in a hurry by those wanting to help support the protests and raise awareness. Others are carefully formatted Google Sheets that provide a checklist of actions people can take — a to-do list of dozens of steps to combat systemic racism. All have been viewed by hundreds of people simultaneously at their peak. In many cases, documents have been populated by using Google Forms — for instance, to collect data on donations to bail funds so organizations can match funding, or to collect signatures for a petition against Harvard University police.”

Wired: How to Protest Safely in the Age of Surveillance

Wired: How to Protest Safely in the Age of Surveillance. “There are two main aspects of digital surveillance to be concerned about while at a protest. One is the data police could potentially obtain from your phone if you are detained, arrested, or they confiscate your device. The other is law enforcement surveillance, which can include wireless interception of text messages and more, and tracking tools like license plate scanners and facial recognition. You should be mindful of both.”

Abacus News: From QR codes to social media, four ways China tracks Covid-19

Abacus News: From QR codes to social media, four ways China tracks Covid-19. “China isn’t the only country using technology to track people who might have come into close contact with Covid-19. In a rare partnership, Google and Apple said that they will work together to build a system for Covid-19 contact tracing using Bluetooth. While the new system has faced criticism and raised privacy concerns, the companies promise it won’t allow people to be identified. But in China, where the government has been criticized for containment measures seen as draconian, people had little say in technological solutions that have been rolled out on a large scale. These solutions have been far from transparent and largely rely on users giving up personal information. Here’s a look at four pieces of technology that became a normal part of daily life in China.”

Wired: How to Cover Your Tracks Every Time You Go Online

Wired: How to Cover Your Tracks Every Time You Go Online. “VENTURE ONLINE NOWADAYS, and your presence is immediately logged and tracked in all manner of ways. Sometimes this can be helpful—like when you want to see new movies similar to ones you’ve watched in the past—but very often it feels invasive and difficult to control. Here we’re going to show you how to cover some of those tracks, or not to leave any in the first place. This isn’t quite the same as going completely invisible online, or encrypting every single thing you do. But it should help you sweep up most records of your online activity that you’d rather disappear.”

Coronavirus in Kurnool: Police uses google maps with geotagging system to implement lockdown (The Hans India)

The Hans India: Coronavirus in Kurnool: Police uses google maps with geotagging system to implement lockdown. “In the wake of the increasing number of coronavirus cases in the Kurnool district, the police have become even more vigilant and are using technology to contain the virus. They have made arrangements for monitoring through online by setting up of COVID-19 Command Control Center at Vyas Auditorium at the District Police Offices and the red zone regions are geotagged using google maps to identify the suspects and patients who come out from their houses.”

CNET: Senators raise privacy questions about Google’s COVID-19 tracker

CNET: Senators raise privacy questions about Google’s COVID-19 tracker. “Two US senators want to make sure Google’s COVID-19 tracker isn’t infringing on millions of people’s privacy. In a letter sent to Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Tuesday, Sens. Ed Markey and Richard Blumenthal raised questions about how the tech giant’s tracker is ensuring that the location data it’s collecting and presenting stays confidential.”

CNN: How the cell phones of spring breakers who flouted coronavirus warnings were tracked

CNN: How the cell phones of spring breakers who flouted coronavirus warnings were tracked. “The Trump administration wants to use Americans’ smartphone location data to help track and combat the spread of coronavirus. Now, a pair of US data companies are making a public pitch to show just how that kind of technology might work. X-Mode and Tectonix focused on a high-profile case: tracking location data from the phones of people who visited the beach in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in March — among them spring breakers who made national news two weeks ago when they ignored warnings to practice social distancing despite the worsening coronavirus pandemic.”

Exclusive: Americans wary of giving up data to fight coronavirus (Axios)

Axios: Exclusive: Americans wary of giving up data to fight coronavirus. “Most Americans don’t want app makers or the government to scrape their data to combat the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey finds, in the face of public- and private-sector efforts to do just that. Why it matters: Efforts to fight the pandemic are putting new pressure on privacy protections, particularly around health information, but this study’s results shared with Axios suggest the U.S. public isn’t ready to give them up.”

CNET: Governments could track COVID-19 lockdowns through social media posts

CNET: Governments could track COVID-19 lockdowns through social media posts. “Your posts on social media have been harvested for advertising. They’ve been taken to build up a massive facial recognition database. Now that same data could be used by companies and governments to help maintain quarantines during the coronavirus outbreak.”

CNET: Governments could track COVID-19 lockdowns through social media posts

CNET: Governments could track COVID-19 lockdowns through social media posts. “Ghost Data, a research group in Italy and the US, collected more than half a million Instagram posts in March, targeting regions in the country where residents were supposed to be on lockdown. It provided those images and videos to LogoGrab, an image recognition company that can automatically identify people and places. The company found at least 33,120 people violated Italy’s quarantine orders.”