Vietnam+: Vietnam steps up digitalisation of cultural heritage

Vietnam+: Vietnam steps up digitalisation of cultural heritage. “The programme aims to build a national database system on cultural heritage on a consistent digital platform, which serves the archive, management, research, conservation and introduction of heritage, thereby fostering sustainable tourism development. It is also to step up digital transformation and integration of national digital data on cultural heritage.”

Arizona State University: ASU Biocollections grant fuels digitization of millions of specimen records

Arizona State University: ASU Biocollections grant fuels digitization of millions of specimen records. “Arizona State University knows a thing or two about natural history. The ASU Natural History Collections are composed of nine different collections — ranking among the largest collections of Sonoran desert biota in the world. Thousands of specimens are tucked into trays, drawers and cupboards. And, while there will always be a need for accumulating and storing natural history specimens, digital access represents an increasingly urgent need in the world of research, education and innovation.”

Trains: Cheseapeake & Ohio Historical society receives slides from J. David Ingles collection

Trains: Cheseapeake & Ohio Historical society receives slides from J. David Ingles collection. “Chesapeake & Ohio Historical Society announced in a press release that it received a collection of slides from the estate of J. David Ingles, the late senior editor of Classic Trains magazine and former editor of Trains magazine. The collection includes many slides from the 1960s and 1970s of the C&O in Ohio and Michigan, Ingles’ birthplace and one-time residence. The historical society is working to scan the approximately 3,000 slides to add to its digital archive.”

City of Tallahassee, Florida: City’s John G. Riley Museum Awarded $246,250 Grant For Archival Digitization Project Partnership

City of Tallahassee, Florida: City’s John G. Riley Museum Awarded $246,250 Grant For Archival Digitization Project Partnership. “The City of Tallahassee’s John G. Riley Center and Museum of African American History and Culture was recently awarded a three-year Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Museum Grant for African American History and Culture. The $246,250 grant will support cross-organizational efforts to digitize its vast archival collection in partnership with the Florida State University Libraries and the Riley Museum Archives at Tallahassee Community College.”

Irish Tech News: TG4 Appoints Its First Archivist

Irish Tech News: TG4 Appoints Its First Archivist. “TG4 wants to increase public access to the station’s digital archive as they celebrate 25 years on air. As a custodian of Irish language Linguistic Assets broadcasting legacy, The TG4 archive contains a valuable and varied repository of material. The development of the digital archive will continue in 2022, work that has been ongoing since the end of 2011. When complete, TG4’s Irish Language Digital Archive will be one of the most extensive and significant bodies of Irish language audio-visual material in the world.”

Global Times: Digital archiving used to preserve Tibetan manuscripts

Global Times: Digital archiving used to preserve Tibetan manuscripts . “Preservation of ancient palm-leaf manuscripts collected in Lhasa’s Potala Palace in Southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region has entered the digital archiving phase, the cultural relics research office of the Potala Palace announced on Sunday. With a total of 29,380 leaves, the Potala Palace has the largest collection of palm-leaf manuscripts in China. A plan to take inventory of and protect the manuscripts was kicked off in May 2020, China News reported on Sunday.”

UK Government: Historic Kew Gardens collection to go digital in major boost for climate change research

UK Government: Historic Kew Gardens collection to go digital in major boost for climate change research . “A £15 million investment to digitise the world’s largest collection of plant and fungal specimens will ‘revolutionise’ climate change research and help protect biodiversity for generations to come, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury announced today (4 November).”

Denver Public Library: Why Everything In The Archives Isn’t Digitized (Yet)

Denver Public Library: Why Everything In The Archives Isn’t Digitized (Yet) . “In the spirit of American Archives Month, this October we’ve compiled a three-blog series about what archivists do and how we make collections accessible. While our first blog post delved into acquisitions and the second examined processing and cataloging, this post will focus on digitization and access.”

Natural History Museum: Digitising all of the Natural History Museum’s collections could create immense global societal benefit – with economic value of more than £2bn

Natural History Museum: Digitising all of the Natural History Museum’s collections could create immense global societal benefit – with economic value of more than £2bn. “The societal benefits of digitising natural history collections extends to global advancements in food security, biodiversity conservation, medicine discovery, minerals exploration, and beyond. Brand new, rigorous economic report predicts investing in digitising natural history museum collections could also result in a tenfold return.”

Smithsonian Magazine: What’s Next for the 1.2 Million Prehistoric Fossils Now at Smithsonian

Smithsonian Magazine: What’s Next for the 1.2 Million Prehistoric Fossils Now at Smithsonian. “Under the grass, gravel, soil and sand lies layers of rock containing a record of past life. In North America, paleontologists have been studying this record for over 150 years. Many of the fossils they unearthed were stored in the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) Denver Fossil Collection…. Earlier this year, the last of the USGS collection’s 1.2 million fossils arrived at the museum, completing an acquisition that began back in 2018. But the acquisition was only one step in a bigger plan to systematize and digitize the USGS fossils for scientists everywhere to access for research.”

Data mining the past: New algorithm searches historic documents to discover noteworthy people (University at Buffalo)

University at Buffalo: Data mining the past: New algorithm searches historic documents to discover noteworthy people. “Old newspapers provide a window into our past, and a new algorithm co-developed by a University at Buffalo School of Management researcher is helping turn those historic documents into useful, searchable data. Published in Decision Support Systems, the algorithm can find and rank people’s names in order of importance from the results produced by optical character recognition (OCR), the computerized method of converting scanned documents into text that is often messy.”

Hawaii Public Radio: Oʻahu’s oldest Christian church has begun digitizing over 200 years of documents

Hawaii Public Radio: Oʻahu’s oldest Christian church has begun digitizing over 200 years of documents. “Kawaiahaʻo Church in Honolulu received a $98,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to digitize these records and make them available to the public online. Kawaiahaʻo was established in 1820 and soon became the primary place of worship for Hawaiian royalty. But many of the church’s records remained in filing cabinets in the basement.”

Greene County Record: Some of Record archive to be searchable online

Greene County Record: Some of Record archive to be searchable online. “he Library of Virginia, in cooperation with the Greene County Record and the Greene County Historical Society, is making progress in converting microfilm records of past editions into a searchable online database. To date, no such digital collection exists for the paper that has served the Greene County community for more than 110 years. Many decades of archived papers exist only in the Record office, and some years exist solely on microfilm in the local office or at the Library of Virginia. If anything were to happen to these crumbling books and pages, county history would be irreparably lost—but this effort hopes to change that.”

The AFRO: Afro Charities receives $535K grant to fund archive digitization efforts

The AFRO: Afro Charities receives $535K grant to fund archive digitization efforts. “The grant, which was issued in July, will support the digitization of the AFRO’s full photo archive, help build new tools to increase access to an exhaustive database of images and support the creation of an artificial intelligence informed online research interface…. The AFRO’s full photo collection, spanning more than a century of media coverage that told stories from a unique Black perspective, includes approximately 3 million photographs, [Savannah] Wood highlighted, also estimating that the Afro Charities’ digitization project will take somewhere from five to 10 years.”

UC Santa Barbara: Sharing Seaweed

UC Santa Barbara: Sharing Seaweed. “UC Santa Barbara hosts a large and historic seaweed collection archived for long-term preservation. Unfortunately, this wealth is largely hidden from public view. Scientists at the university’s Vernon and Mary Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) were determined to make this valuable data freely available through a recently funded digitization program.”