New York Times: Using Computer Vision to Create A More Accurate Digital Archive

New York Times: Using Computer Vision to Create A More Accurate Digital Archive. “This video series from R&D features team members describing their roles, processes and the specific technical challenges they encounter while building and shipping projects. Along with each episode, we’ll share relevant background, resources, references and advice for anyone interested in creating something similar or learning more…. In this episode, R&D Intern Lasse Nordahl explains the process of converting over 10 million scanned images of articles from The Times’s archive into machine-readable text.”

Southeastern US herbaria digitize three million specimens, now freely available online (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Southeastern US herbaria digitize three million specimens, now freely available online. “A network of over 100 herbaria spread out across the southeastern United States recently completed the herculean task of fully digitizing more than three million specimens collected by botanists and naturalists over a span of 200 years…. In a new study published in the journal Applications in Plant Sciences, researchers involved in the project analyzed the rate at which specimens could be reliably photographed, digitized, and databased to assess how much similar efforts might cost in the future.”

Florida Museum of Natural History: iDigBio receives $20 million from NSF to sustain U.S. museum digitization efforts

Florida Museum of Natural History: iDigBio receives $20 million from NSF to sustain U.S. museum digitization efforts. “The National Science Foundation has awarded iDigBio nearly $20 million to continue its mission of digitizing natural history collections nationwide, making them available online to researchers, educators and community scientists around the world.”

KSL: Board grants $25K to digitize pieces of Utah history. Here’s what is getting preserved

KSL: Board grants $25K to digitize pieces of Utah history. Here’s what is getting preserved. “Ever wanted to watch a jazz legend perform in Cedar City or read what Salt Lake County commissioners met about back in 1852? You may soon be in luck. The Utah State Historical Records Advisory Board, under the Utah Division of Archives and Records Service, last week approved a little more than $25,000 in grants that will go toward six organizations working to digitize pieces of Utah history and make it more accessible.”

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: National Archives grant will fund Pittsburgh records digitization, ‘a real boon’ for genealogy

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: National Archives grant will fund Pittsburgh records digitization, ‘a real boon’ for genealogy. “Just under $134,000 from the National Archives and Records Administration will fund the processing of 751 cubic feet of historical government records that contains seven collections from City Council, City Planning, the Planning Commission, the Department of Public Works, the Historic Review Commission and the Urban Redevelopment Authority.”

Sanibel Captiva: Shell museum to present special photography exhibit

Sanibel Captiva: Shell museum to present special photography exhibit. “The Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum announced its new exhibition, titled ‘In Focus: Precision Photography of Extraordinary and Uncommon Shells,’ will be on display May 29 through Nov. 28. Science Director and Curator Dr. José H. Leal has been leading a project for the museum to build a publicly accessible photo archive of its shell collection. The exhibition photographs were taken for the Digital Imaging Project, which was funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.” I love that they took the photography process and turned it into an exhibit!

California State University Northridge: CSUN Receives NEH Grant to Digitize its Farmworker Movement Collection

California State University Northridge: CSUN Receives NEH Grant to Digitize its Farmworker Movement Collection. “The Tom & Ethel Bradley Center at California State University, Northridge has received a $350,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to digitize some of the approximately 22,000 images in its Farmworker Movement Collection that tell the story and document efforts to unionize farmworkers in the 1960s and early 1970s.”

Georgia State University: Georgia State Libraries Awarded National Grant To Digitize Historically Significant Labor and Civil Rights Materials

Georgia State University: Georgia State Libraries Awarded National Grant To Digitize Historically Significant Labor and Civil Rights Materials. “Georgia State University’s Libraries have received a $350,000 grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to digitize and provide access to American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) Civil Rights Southeast Division and national-level records from the AFL, CIO and AFL-CIO Civil Rights Department.”

The Telegram: Digitization of long out-of-print Newfoundland traditional music creates permanent record

The Telegram: Digitization of long out-of-print Newfoundland traditional music creates permanent record. “A light thump and/or slight crackle are often the first sounds heard when ‘Play’ is pressed for audio files on the Bandcamp page Kelly Russell established for his production company, Pigeon Inlet Productions. It’s an odd noise to hear on a WAV file or MP3. But there’s a reason. Russell recently uploaded his out-of-print vinyl collection to the internet as a way to preserve the songs, jigs, reels and recitations he had carved into wax beginning 42 years ago.”

Telengana Today: Mammoth digitisation drive at TS Central Library

Telengana Today (India): Mammoth digitisation drive at TS Central Library. “Established in 1891, the State Central Library also known as Asafia Library is one of the biggest public libraries in the country with a collection of over 5 lakh books, newspapers and other periodicals. Over the last two decades, the digital library staff has scanned and digitised 45,704 books and now are in plans of making that digitised collection available online at a nominal cost.”

Central Jersey: Historical Society of Princeton digitizes 300 at-risk oral history recordings

Central Jersey: Historical Society of Princeton digitizes 300 at-risk oral history recordings. “Collections transferred include: Interviews conducted by the Princeton History Project, an oral history initiative during the 1970s and 1980s that documented the stories of Princeton residents alive at the turn-of-the-century; Interviews conducted by author Jamie Sayen in the 1970s with Albert Einstein’s Princeton friends and colleagues that provide an intimate look at a man with New Jersey connections and worldwide appeal; and Oral histories from the residents of Princeton’s historic African American and Italian American communities, including interviews conducted by author Kathryn Watterson for her award-winning book ‘I Hear My People Singing: Voices of African American Princeton,’ published by the Princeton University Press in 2017.”

Internet Archive Blog: Giving “Last Chance Books” New Life Through Digitization

Internet Archive: Giving “Last Chance Books” New Life Through Digitization. “Aging books are sent from libraries to the Internet Archive for preservation. Thanks to the careful work of the nearly 70 people who scan at digitization centers in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada, the books get a second life with a new audience. Scanners sometimes call these ‘Last Chance Books’ and they take pride in restoring them. As they turn the pages one at time to be photographed and digitized, they develop a daily cadence—but it must be adjusted with fragile materials.”

WLRN: Stonewall National Museum & Archives Gets Money To Go Digital

WLRN: Stonewall National Museum & Archives Gets Money To Go Digital. “The Stonewall National Museum & Archives is digitizing the LGBTQ history it’s been collecting for nearly 50 years — a dream that started before the pandemic but is even more urgent now. The Fort Lauderdale museum received a $50,000 dollar grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to begin the process to put its archives online.”