BBC: Isle of Man ‘rich sound archive’ to be digitised

BBC: Isle of Man ‘rich sound archive’ to be digitised . “Recordings of the last native Manx speakers and wartime internees from the Isle of Man’s ‘rich sound archive’ are to be digitised and put online as part of a British Library project. About 600 recordings held in the Manx National Heritage (MNH) archives will be converted as part of the £9.3m Unlocking Our Sound Heritage scheme.”

La Cruces Bulletin: State museum puts fossil, biological specimens online

La Cruces Bulletin: State museum puts fossil, biological specimens online. “The New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science (NMMNHS) has opened the door to more than 110,000 fossil and biological specimens. Thanks to an anonymous gift, the museum’s collection records are now publicly available through Arctos, an online database.”

Xinhua: Digitalization used to bring back Dunhuang’s cultural relics

Xinhua: Digitalization used to bring back Dunhuang’s cultural relics. “Chinese researchers plan to digitalize cultural relics that were taken overseas from the famed Mogao Grottoes more than a century ago. The relics excavated from the Library Cave in Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes will be digitalized, Luo Huaqing, deputy director of the Dunhuang Academy, said at an academic conference on Saturday.”

The Chattanoogan: “Hey Earl” Radio Programs Donated To Be Digitized

The Chattanoogan: “Hey Earl” Radio Programs Donated To Be Digitized. “Earl (Hey Earl) Freudenberg has donated over 500 audio cassette tapes of his popular ‘Hey Earl’ radio program on WDOD to Picnooga/Chattanooga Historical Society. Mr. Freudenberg’s radio presence in the Chattanooga area has spanned nearly 55 years, and his work started at WDOD in 1965. The shows he personally recorded are from the mid-1980s through the early 2000s and include many interviews of local and regional personalities.”

The Indian Express: Assam’s century-old literary body turns a new page, will digitise its rich archive

The Indian Express: Assam’s century-old literary body turns a new page, will digitise its rich archive. “From the first Assamese language magazine to an ancient treatise on elephantology — publications of yore, some handwritten, some tattered and torn, some considered lost, will soon find a home online, courtesy a mammoth digitising project undertaken by Assam’s oldest literary and cultural body, the Asam Sahitya Sabha.”

University of Toronto: Armed with 3D scanners, U of T anthropologists ready hundreds of fossils for virtual labs

University of Toronto: Armed with 3D scanners, U of T anthropologists ready hundreds of fossils for virtual labs. “In a small room at the Terrence Donnelly Health Science Complex at the University of Toronto Mississauga, a cast of a hominin skull is carefully being scanned. Its prominent features, distinguishing characteristics and even the smallest surface details are all replicated in exacting detail as part of a project that’s bringing fossils into the digital realm. The skull is one of hundreds of specimens being added to an online 3D digital database for anthropology students who can’t access bone casts and fossils in person due to the pandemic.”

Jewish Press: 180 Years of Australian Jewish Newspaper History Going Online

Jewish Press: 180 Years of Australian Jewish Newspaper History Going Online. “A new initiative will digitize and open free digital access to 180 years of Australian Jewish newspapers, including over 200,000 pages from Jewish communities across the continent. The project is a collaboration between the National Library of Australia (NLA), the National Library of Israel (NLI), and the Australian Jewish Historical Society (AJHS).”

Ian Visits: The world’s largest archive of magazines – is in South-East London

Ian Visits: The world’s largest archive of magazines – is in South-East London. “HyMag – formerly The Hyman Archive – was founded by media industry-insider James Hyman in 2011, it holds the Guinness World Record for ‘Largest Collection of Magazines’ — with over 150,000 magazines from the 1850s to modern times….The digital archive is expected to launch next year. Unfortunately, as with many private organisations, the pandemic has been a major problem so they are now crowdfunding to keep the collection intact and continue the digital project.”

Washington State University: Grant to fund digitization of early 20th‑century Extension publications

Washington State University: Grant to fund digitization of early 20th‑century Extension publications. “A recent grant from the Center for Research Libraries’ Project CERES will allow Washington State University Libraries to digitize some 41,000 documents of early Washington State College Extension home economics publications as well as reports of the then-named Tree Fruit Experiment Station, today’s WSU Wenatchee Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center.”

KTRE: Texas Film Commission announces statewide Texas Film Round-Up

KTRE: Texas Film Commission announces statewide Texas Film Round-Up. “The Texas Film Commission (TFC) today announced that the Texas Archive of the Moving Image (TAMI) is offering a statewide Texas Film Round-Up mail-in event for the entire month of October. Individuals, businesses, and institutions are invited to submit their Texas-related films and videotapes to TAMI for free digitization in exchange for contributing a digital copy of their materials for possible inclusion in TAMI’s online archive.”

Times of India: Egmore museum to start digitisation drive in October

Times of India: Egmore museum to start digitisation drive in October. “The move will also help India’s second oldest museum in updating its official portal with pictures of its rich collection. The digitisation drive will cover the accession register, a record that contains details of each artefact. According to museum sources, the project will take about six months.”

University of California Davis: Historians to Digitize Endangered Peruvian Archive

University of California Davis: Historians to Digitize Endangered Peruvian Archive. “For years, the historical papers of a Peruvian peasants’ rights group sat heaped in piles on the floor of a house in downtown Lima — threatened by pests, political foes, thieves and natural disasters, but largely off limits to scholars and the public. A new project led by UC Davis historian Charles Walker will digitize documents of the Peruvian Peasant Confederation (Confederación Campesina del Perú, or CCP) and make them accessible online.”

Centennial Citizen: Preserving blind Coloradans’ history

Centennial Citizen: Preserving blind Coloradans’ history. “More than a century’s worth of records now packed into boxes and storage containers in the basement of the Colorado Center for the Blind will soon be transformed into a comprehensive, digital history and made available to the public. Members of the National Federation of the Blind of Colorado are in year two of a five-year project to digitally preserve records of the state’s blind community — before the documents deteriorate or are lost. Most importantly, project leaders said, the history will finally be accessible to the very community it’s written about.”

Connecticut State Library: Connecticut State Library Announces Historic Newspaper Titles to be Digitized

Connecticut State Library: Connecticut State Library Announces Historic Newspaper Titles to be Digitized. “The Connecticut State Library is pleased to announce that with a fourth grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the following newspaper titles have been selected to be digitized for the Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project (CDNP), and made freely available online.”

Chicago Tribune: Column: Library’s digital archives of Blue Island newspaper will soon provide a glimpse into south suburb’s roots

Chicago Tribune: Column: Library’s digital archives of Blue Island newspaper will soon provide a glimpse into south suburb’s roots. “The Blue Island Public Library is finishing up a grant-funded digitization project that will soon allow public access to editions of the Sun-Standard newspaper from 1911 to 1990 and provide a valuable resource for genealogists, researchers and homeowners. The pages offer a glimpse into the rich history of Blue Island and other south suburban communities. The newspaper chronicled government, crime and other news, but also told stories of everyday life among neighbors.”