PODCAST: Moving a Hundred-Year-Old Series Online: Getty’s Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (Getty Iris)

Getty Iris: PODCAST: Moving a Hundred-Year-Old Series Online: Getty’s Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum. “How do you reimagine a century-old reference series for the digital age? In 1919, a French archaeologist started the Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, or CVA, with the ambitious goal of cataloging every ancient painted vase in the world. Nearly 400 volumes, compiling some 100,000 vases, have been published to date, making the CVA one of the most important resources for researchers working on ancient Greek art and culture. Getty’s most recent addition to the CVA is the first born-digital, open-access volume of this essential series. In this episode, Despoina Tsiafakis, the author of Getty’s new CVA volume and the director of research at the Athena Research and Innovation Center in Greece, speaks with Getty curator David Saunders and Getty digital publications manager Greg Albers about the history of the CVA and the process of bringing the series to a new digital platform.” Podcast with transcript.

New York Times: How to Digitize Your Most Important Documents

New York Times: How to Digitize Your Most Important Documents. “Scanning copies of your personal papers creates a digital archive that can also be used as a backup, especially if you have the files password-protected and stored in a secure location. And even if you don’t have a document scanner, you can create your personal archive with a smartphone, a few apps and a bit of time. Here’s a guide to getting started.”

CNN: Kansas City’s WWI Museum is avoiding layoffs by giving employees thousands of pages from its archives to digitize

CNN: Kansas City’s WWI Museum is avoiding layoffs by giving employees thousands of pages from its archives to digitize. “A museum in Kansas City, Missouri is avoiding laying off its employees during the coronavirus pandemic by giving some of them a big project to take on. The National WWI Museum and Memorial said it is moving 10 of its employees to a team dedicated to digitizing thousands of letters, diaries and journals.”

VOX EU: The promise of automated historical data linkage

VOX EU: The promise of automated historical data linkage. “A number of vital questions in the social sciences, relating to intergenerational mobility or assimilation of migrants for example, require data that follow individuals over time. The recent digitisation of historical population censuses for the US and other countries has increased their availability, but linking such historical data is challenging. This column compares the performance of various linking methods and concludes that automated methods perform no worse on key dimensions than (more expensive) hand linking using standard linking variables.”

New York Times: Get Those Records, Tapes and CDs Onto Your Smartphone

New York Times: Get Those Records, Tapes and CDs Onto Your Smartphone. “In addition to making files that play on your smartphone or media server, digitizing your analog audio creates an electronic archive you can store online for safekeeping. The steps for converting your old recordings vary on the formats and equipment you have, but here’s a general outline of the process and the equipment you may need.”

The Register: Experts warn UK court digitisation is moving too fast and breaking too many things

The Register: Experts warn UK court digitisation is moving too fast and breaking too many things. “Ambitious plans to digitise Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service via a £1bn modernisation programme should be slowed down even further, MPs heard this week. The Ministry of Justice is seeking to cut costs by closing courts and putting services online. That programme is due to be completed in 2023, three years later than originally planned.”

PSN Europe: An investigation into the world of digitising and archiving

PSN Europe: An investigation into the world of digitising and archiving. “PSNEurope’s Marc Maes takes a deep dive into the world of audiovisual digitising and archiving by investigating the workings of VIAA, the Flemish Institute for Archiving, on its expansive, 12 million euro digitisation project, as well as the French-speaking RTBF and the leading Memnon Archiving services…”

CLIR: CLIR Announces 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Awards

CLIR: CLIR Announces 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Awards. “The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) today announced the award of over $3.8 million to fund 17 projects for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. More than 40 institutions located in 17 states and one US territory will be involved in the projects covering subjects ranging from endangered languages and displaced peoples to health issues, architecture, and fisheries.”

BBC: ‘Digital museum’ brings millions of fossils out of the dark

BBC: ‘Digital museum’ brings millions of fossils out of the dark. “The bid to create a ‘global digital museum’ has been welcomed by scientists, who say it will enable them to study valuable specimens that are currently “hidden” in museum drawers. Museums including London’s Natural History Museum and the Smithsonian in Washington DC are involved.”

The digitized future: How libraries are pioneering a cultural transformation (DW)

DW: The digitized future: How libraries are pioneering a cultural transformation. “Some 120 million visitors take advantage of the educational and cultural offerings of German libraries each year. That’s one reason why, in September, the German Council for Cultural Education published a study on the digitization of library services. One of the results: Digitization has a very positive effect on both the image, and range of services, of libraries.”

Livemint: Why libraries that digitize and expedite the availability of new content will not die

Livemint: Why libraries that digitize and expedite the availability of new content will not die. “…in a world that is becoming increasingly digital, do libraries have a future? The short answer would be: If books have a future, then so do libraries. And libraries are more than just about books. They are safe public spaces where you meet, sit, read and work. Walk into BCL in Delhi and see how crowded it is: young people doing reference work, taking notes from books. Even in the days of internet, a good library is a priceless resource. Sadly, in many parts of the world libraries are struggling for funds; but there are also many enlightened nations where governments are spending millions on new libraries, many of which are designed by world-renowned architects.”

Cornell University: Seven projects awarded 2018 digitization grants

Cornell University: Seven projects awarded 2018 digitization grants. “Seasoned documents and artifacts are starting fresh digital lives through the Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences, which is funding seven projects this year. Launched in 2010, the program supports faculty members and graduate students in creating online collections vital for their own and for general scholarship.”

Smithsonian Institution Archives: An Intern’s Guide on How to Digitize a Field Book

Smithsonian Institution Archives: An Intern’s Guide on How to Digitize a Field Book . “What is a field book and how do you digitize one? These were the first two questions I asked when I came on board at the Archives as the Summer 2018 Field Book Project Digitization Intern. During the course of my internship, I discovered the answer to both questions and learned a lot about digitization practices and standards at the Smithsonian.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Value Labor in Digital Projects

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Value Labor in Digital Projects. “Digital projects often bring together many different members of an institution, or several institutions, and those members often have very different statuses: students (undergraduate or graduate), workers in precarious positions, those with permanent positions, etc. Understanding and properly valuing all of this work, and the disparate effects such work has on the different people who perform it, is an ongoing challenge.”

A Summer of Mid-1940s Melodies: Processing Master Recordings from the Decca Label (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: A Summer of Mid-1940s Melodies: Processing Master Recordings from the Decca Label. “In 2011, Universal Music Group (UMG) donated more than 200,000 master recordings to the Library of Congress’ Recorded Sound Section, which maintains approximately 3.6 million sound recordings at the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia. Within the collection’s 5,000 linear feet of material are historic recordings by artists such as Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong, the Andrews Sisters, Billie Holiday, Guy Lombardo and Les Paul. Many of these tracks were recorded onto thousands of 16-inch lacquer discs. Those created during the mid-1940s on UMG’s subsidiary label Decca serve as the focus of my project this summer. My goal for the 10 weeks that I am in Culpeper is to process as many of the discs as possible, which may seem like monotonous work, but has proven to be quite the opposite.”