Livemint: Why libraries that digitize and expedite the availability of new content will not die

Livemint: Why libraries that digitize and expedite the availability of new content will not die. “…in a world that is becoming increasingly digital, do libraries have a future? The short answer would be: If books have a future, then so do libraries. And libraries are more than just about books. They are safe public spaces where you meet, sit, read and work. Walk into BCL in Delhi and see how crowded it is: young people doing reference work, taking notes from books. Even in the days of internet, a good library is a priceless resource. Sadly, in many parts of the world libraries are struggling for funds; but there are also many enlightened nations where governments are spending millions on new libraries, many of which are designed by world-renowned architects.”

Cornell University: Seven projects awarded 2018 digitization grants

Cornell University: Seven projects awarded 2018 digitization grants. “Seasoned documents and artifacts are starting fresh digital lives through the Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences, which is funding seven projects this year. Launched in 2010, the program supports faculty members and graduate students in creating online collections vital for their own and for general scholarship.”

Smithsonian Institution Archives: An Intern’s Guide on How to Digitize a Field Book

Smithsonian Institution Archives: An Intern’s Guide on How to Digitize a Field Book . “What is a field book and how do you digitize one? These were the first two questions I asked when I came on board at the Archives as the Summer 2018 Field Book Project Digitization Intern. During the course of my internship, I discovered the answer to both questions and learned a lot about digitization practices and standards at the Smithsonian.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Value Labor in Digital Projects

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Value Labor in Digital Projects. “Digital projects often bring together many different members of an institution, or several institutions, and those members often have very different statuses: students (undergraduate or graduate), workers in precarious positions, those with permanent positions, etc. Understanding and properly valuing all of this work, and the disparate effects such work has on the different people who perform it, is an ongoing challenge.”

A Summer of Mid-1940s Melodies: Processing Master Recordings from the Decca Label (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: A Summer of Mid-1940s Melodies: Processing Master Recordings from the Decca Label. “In 2011, Universal Music Group (UMG) donated more than 200,000 master recordings to the Library of Congress’ Recorded Sound Section, which maintains approximately 3.6 million sound recordings at the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia. Within the collection’s 5,000 linear feet of material are historic recordings by artists such as Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong, the Andrews Sisters, Billie Holiday, Guy Lombardo and Les Paul. Many of these tracks were recorded onto thousands of 16-inch lacquer discs. Those created during the mid-1940s on UMG’s subsidiary label Decca serve as the focus of my project this summer. My goal for the 10 weeks that I am in Culpeper is to process as many of the discs as possible, which may seem like monotonous work, but has proven to be quite the opposite.”

The Art Of The Annual: The Virginia Yearbook Digitization Project (Virginia Memory)

Virginia Memory: The Art Of The Annual: The Virginia Yearbook Digitization Project. “In 2015, I started the Library’s yearbook digitization project to scan yearbooks from all around Virginia on behalf of public libraries. Thanks to funds from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), we have been able to digitize and provide access to 2,308 yearbooks published though 1977, the year that copyright law impacts use. So far, 35 local libraries have contributed their yearbooks, with more in process. There is no set end date for this project; it will continue as long as IMLS funding supports it and there are willing participants. While working with the yearbooks from the Library of Virginia collection, I began to notice the artistic elements of the yearbooks.”

Call for Applications: Digitizing Canadian Collections Funding (Librarianship Canada)

Librarianship Canada: Call for Applications: Digitizing Canadian Collections Funding
. “The National Heritage Digitization Strategy (NHDS) Steering Committee today announced the launch of the Digitizing Canadian Collections funding call. Thanks to a gift from a private donor, this one-time opportunity will provide funds to organizations to digitize, make accessible, and preserve documentary heritage material of national significance. Archives, museums, libraries, universities, colleges, and other cultural heritage institutions can apply to receive funding of up to $100,000.”