University of Virginia: The Big Reveal In Fossil Research

University of Virginia: The Big Reveal In Fossil Research. “While an undergraduate at the University of Chicago, Caitlin Wylie worked in the lab of well-known paleontologist Paul Sereno – a prolific discoverer of dinosaur skeletons – preparing fossils for research by carefully scraping rock off bones and gluing broken bones together…. Although Wylie loved the job, it wasn’t the dinosaurs, but the preparators who captured her imagination. Years later, she recently published a book, ‘Preparing Dinosaurs: The Work Behind the Scenes,’ which, among other things, explains how those magnificent museum displays of dinosaur skeletons are assembled.”

ReviewGeek: David Attenborough and Dinosaurs Come to Your Living Room in this AR iPhone App

ReviewGeek: David Attenborough and Dinosaurs Come to Your Living Room in this AR iPhone App. “The app, Museum Alive, is a fun extension of David Attenborough’s documentary Natural History Museum Alive, which was created in 2014. In the film, he encountered CGI skeletons as he walked through the London museum and talked about them. The engaging app has a similar feel but uses animated 3D models of habitats that you or your child can view through a smartphone camera.”

Printing dinosaurs: Idaho Virtualization Lab leads a “3-D revolution” (The Bengal)

The Bengal: Printing dinosaurs: Idaho Virtualization Lab leads a “3-D revolution”. “[Idaho State University] houses the Idaho Virtualization lab in the Idaho Museum of Natural History, which is on the leading edge of the 3-D printing revolution in digitizing and printing fossils, according to museum director Leif Tapanila. The program has been going for 15 years, and Tapanila said in those years, the rest of the country has begun to recognize the value of digitizing and 3-D printing fossils.”

Scroll: What a fossil revolution can tell us about the history of ‘big data’

Scroll: What a fossil revolution can tell us about the history of ‘big data’. “…far from spending his time climbing dangerous cliffs and digging up dinosaurs, Jack Sepkoski spent most of his career in front of a computer, building what would become the first comprehensive database on the fossil record of life. The analysis that he and his colleagues performed revealed new understandings of phenomena such as diversification and extinction and changed the way that palaeontologists work. But he was about as different from Indiana Jones as you can get. The intertwining tales of my father and his discipline contain lessons for the current era of algorithmic analysis and artificial intelligence and points to the value-laden way in which we see data.”

SV-POW Blog: A database of all dinosaur specimens in the world

From the SV-POW blog (I’m afraid if I put the whole blog name in the headline I’ll break Twitter; it’s the Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week): A database of all dinosaur specimens in the world. “Wouldn’t it be great if there was a database of all dinosaur specimens? Well, there is — or at least, it’s on its way. Gunnar Bivens, who we know from SV-POW! comments as bricksmashtv, in creaing a vast Google-Docs Spreadsheet which at the time of writing has the following entries in various tabs…”

Popular Mechanics: Check Out An Interactive Map of Every Dinosaur Fossil Found On Earth

From Popular Mechanics (no, really): Check Out An Interactive Map of Every Dinosaur Fossil Found On Earth . “Some engineers have created an interactive map to navigate the overwhelming amount of data created by the Paleobiology Database, a massive collection of information about fossils and related research. The map essentially plots the location of every fossil ever found by scientists, from early mammals to dinosaurs.”

“Hack the Dinos” for Better Paleontology Tools

Fun story from The New York Times: Hack the Dinos. “The museum’s paleontologists brainstormed for months about digital tools that they wished existed. Automating skull analysis was one item on the wish list. Others included modernizing the venerable field notebook to the age of smartphones and converting cladograms — the family trees that show the evolutionary relationships among species — to digital formats.”

Dinosaur National Monument’s “Wall of Bones” Mapped/Digitized

The Dinosaur National Monument’s “Wall of Bones” has been mapped and digitized. “Dinosaur National Monument’s famous Wall of Bones is now online for everyone to explore. Two stories high and packed with fossils, the Carnegie Quarry is one of the few places in existence where the public can view dinosaur bones exactly where they were first uncovered in the rock. … The Carnegie Quarry originally held over 5000 fossils, 1500 of which remain in the rock where they were deposited in an ancient riverbed. Athird of those are currently included in the interactive Digital Quarry. Eventually, the Digital Quarry will incorporate all of the original 5000 – digitally reconstructing the historic quarry and making all associated data and archival materials publicly accessible.”