Cornell Chronicle: Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability

Cornell Chronicle: Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability. “‘There are micro-moments in the archive where your privilege and positionality take you along a different research route,’ said Julia Chang, assistant professor of Spanish studies in the Romance Studies Department, College of Arts and Sciences, describing not just experiences she and other researchers have had in archives, but also a moment programmed into an online, text-based game she developed this year with an undergraduate researcher.”

PR Newswire: accessiBe, The Web Accessibility Market Leader, Announces New Search Engine accessFind to Help People with Disabilities Find Accessible Websites (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: accessiBe, The Web Accessibility Market Leader, Announces New Search Engine accessFind to Help People with Disabilities Find Accessible Websites (PRESS RELEASE). “Through partnerships with organizations including United Spinal Association, Columbia Lighthouse For The Blind (CLB), The Viscardi Center, The IMAGE Center of Maryland, Earle Baum Center of the Blind, Determined2Heal, Senspoint, and others, accessFind will be the first search engine designed to enhance how people with disabilities navigate the internet through the creation of an accessible-friendly index of websites.”

SameSport.Arkansas Launch & Panel: Sports as a Tool for Social Change (University of Arkansas)

University of Arkansas: SameSport.Arkansas Launch & Panel: Sports as a Tool for Social Change. “SameSport-Arkansas is an inclusive two-sided community marketplace that makes it easier for people with disabilities to find accessible sports and activities in the area. A one-stop online database, samesport.org, hosts a curated user-friendly database with search filters (sports, inclusivity, level, age, disability, availability online), and description of each location with photos, price and schedule.”

Stuff New Zealand: Google blocks ads for disability documentaries, labelling them ‘shocking content’

Stuff New Zealand: Google blocks ads for disability documentaries, labelling them ‘shocking content’. “An Auckland production company is calling on Google and YouTube to change their ad policies after adverts for documentaries about medical conditions and people with disabilities were blocked for breaching rules around ‘shocking content’.”

THIIS: Professional hub launches with searchable database of independent living tech

THIIS: Professional hub launches with searchable database of independent living tech. “ProAssist has been created by the charity Disabled Living Foundation (DLF) in partnership with the TEC Services Association (TSA), the national body for technology enabled care (TEC) services. With a searchable database of over 10,000 products from more than 900 retailers, this UK-wide resource helps identify the options across a wide range of technologies, from the latest digital devices to simple aids.”

TechCrunch: 4 signs your product is not as accessible as you think

TechCrunch: 4 signs your product is not as accessible as you think. “For too many companies, accessibility wasn’t baked into their products from the start, meaning they now find themselves trying to figure out how to inject it retrospectively. But bringing decades-long legacy code and design into the future isn’t easy (or cheap). Businesses have to overcome the fear and uncertainty about how to do such retrofitting, address the lack of education to launch such projects, and balance the scope of these iterations while still maintaining other production work.”

Phys .org: Sports information on social networks leaves out women, disabled and minority disciplines

Phys.org: Sports information on social networks leaves out women, disabled and minority disciplines. “Researchers from the University of Seville and Pompeu Fabra University argue that sports information on social media is dominated by men and football. This leaves out women’s sports, sports featuring athletes with disabilities and minority disciplines, thus repeating the reality of the traditional media. That is the main conclusion of a study analyzing more than 7,000 tweets published by the profiles of four public media in four European countries.”

Glamsham: Google and Levi’s connected jacket helps people with disabilities

Glamsham: Google and Levi’s connected jacket helps people with disabilities. “A connected jacket designed by Google and Levi’s has proved to be beneficial for people with disabilities who tried out the apparel. The connected jacket with woven ‘Jacquard’ technology allows people to connect to their smartphone and use simple gestures to trigger functions from the Jacquard app.”

Insight: Why disabled artists can’t go back to normal (The Scotsman)

The Scotsman: Insight: Why disabled artists can’t go back to normal. “For [Ever] Dundas and other disabled artists the restrictions caused by the pandemic have been a double-edged sword. Many with underlying conditions were forced to shield, but it has also created new ways of working. With live public gatherings impossible, theatre productions and literary events have moved online, allowing those with disabilities to access them for the first time.”

DCist: How A Network Of Homes For Adults With Disabilities Has Managed To Keep COVID At Bay

DCist: How A Network Of Homes For Adults With Disabilities Has Managed To Keep COVID At Bay. “[Hazel] Pulliam is part of L’Arche, a community of people with and without intellectual disabilities who live together in group homes within an interdenominational Christian community. L’Arche operates four of these homes, with two each in D.C. and Arlington. Each house supports two to four residents — or ‘core members,’ as the organization calls them — along with their caretakers, some of whom live in the homes as well. Since the pandemic began, L’Arche has kept all four of its homes, including its 14 residents and their assistants, COVID-19 infection-free — no small feat, considering that shared housing and congregate settings face greater challenges when preventing the spread of the virus. ”

USA Today: My brother has daily seizures. COVID-19 restrictions are making him sicker.

USA Today: My brother has daily seizures. COVID-19 restrictions are making him sicker.. “My brother has seizures every day. Sometimes focal ones, where his eyes dart back and forth like he’s rapidly scanning a novel. But lately, they’ve become more violent as my brother’s routine, so tethered to his mental and physical health, has been suspended by the COVID-19 pandemic. The novel coronavirus has seen hundreds of thousands – if not millions – of Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities removed from their routines and become more isolated. In some cases, the disruption has contributed to them becoming sicker.”

BuzzFeed News: Her Disability Check Wasn’t Enough To Live On. The Pandemic Took Away Her Other Options To Get By.

BuzzFeed News: Her Disability Check Wasn’t Enough To Live On. The Pandemic Took Away Her Other Options To Get By.. “The country’s disability safety net was never adequate to support many of the people who rely on it, and throughout the pandemic, it has failed those like Chelsy who are now unable to find ways to make up the shortfall. She still has medical expenses to pay. Chelsy said while the government’s Social Security Disability Insurance provides necessary aid, it was never possible to survive on it alone, making it hard for recipients like her to get by if they lose their supplementary earnings.”