Finding Comfort at Home: New Website Logs Solutions to Everyday Problems for Disabled People and Their Caregivers (UConn Today)

UConn Today: Finding Comfort at Home: New Website Logs Solutions to Everyday Problems for Disabled People and Their Caregivers. “The many uses of that traditionally blue roll are just some of the little life hacks on Mauldin’s new website, Disability at Home, which, even though an offshoot of larger research, is nonetheless just as much a passion project. [Laura] Mauldin, an associate professor in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and the human development and family sciences department, says she’s also struck by the uses for rubberized shelf liner on things like trays and by the uses for zip ties to fix things like a brake on a wheelchair.” Lots of useful stuff here. Wish this had been around when I was taking care of Granny in her home.

NiemanLab: Two new bots can help newsrooms prioritize accessibility and alt text

NiemanLab: Two new bots can help newsrooms prioritize accessibility and alt text. “The Objective recently spoke with Patrick Garvin about his Accessibility Awareness and Alt Text Awareness Twitter bots that provide information on web accessibility and encourage the use of alt text, respectively. With more than a decade of experience in visual journalism, user experience, and front-end development, Garvin shares how prioritizing accessibility is possible for all newsroom employees, not just tech staff.”

University College London: Students develop software to revolutionise computer use for millions

University College London: Students develop software to revolutionise computer use for millions. “The software could revolutionise the way that millions of people use computers by allowing those with mobility issues to easily interact with their PCs without the need to buy adapted computers and use pointer devices. It has already been endorsed by charities including the International Alliance of ALS/MND Associations, which supports people with Motor Neurone Disease (MND) around the world and is making a positive impact on people’s daily lives.” And it’s free for individual users.

Reykjavik Grapevine: New Website Shows Accessibility Performance At Secondary Schools

Reykjavik Grapevine: New Website Shows Accessibility Performance At Secondary Schools. “The Union of Icelandic Secondary School Students has launched the Support Bank, which ranks school performance on accessibility and services for those with learning needs, RÚV reports. The website was developed with input from students with learning needs. Questionnaires were sent to schools to collect the data for the website.”

TechCrunch: Apple adds live captions to iPhone and Mac, plus more accessibility upgrades to come

TechCrunch: Apple adds live captions to iPhone and Mac, plus more accessibility upgrades to come. “Apple has released a bevy of new accessibility features for iPhone, Apple Watch and Mac, including a universal live captioning tool, improved visual and auditory detection modes, and iOS access to WatchOS apps. The new capabilities will arrive ‘later this year’ as updates roll out to various platforms.”

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: Students improve mobile app accessibility for people with disabilities

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: Students improve mobile app accessibility for people with disabilities. “Although a growing number of people are dependent on their mobile devices for everyday obligations, developers seldom seek to make their apps accessible to people with disabilities. Mobile apps don’t often pay heed to accessibility guidelines and this can make it more difficult for people with motor disabilities and older individuals to use the app, or even prevent them from carrying out those everyday obligations. Enter Ali Alotaibi and Paul Chiou, two Viterbi Ph.D. students who want to make the process of redesigning apps for accessibility convenient, too.”

News 4 San Antonio: City discusses how to include people with disabilities as they move to “smart” technology

News 4 San Antonio: City discusses how to include people with disabilities as they move to “smart” technology. “Hundreds of thousands of people in San Antonio are living with a disability. This week at the Texas Smart Cities Summit in San Antonio, one of the biggest conversations has been how to make the Alamo City more accessible for people who are blind, deaf, or have other disabilities.”

MedicineNet: Who Are the New ‘Patient Influencers’ on Social Media?

MedicineNet: Who Are the New ‘Patient Influencers’ on Social Media?. “Patient influencers like [Gem] Hubbard fill social media these days, and a new report says pharmaceutical companies and medical device manufacturers view them as an increasingly popular direct-to-consumer marketing tool. These patient influencers share their stories in online health forums and on social media, using their personal experiences to help inform and educate others.”

TIME: Back-to-Office Pressure Is Creating a Crisis for Long COVID Patients

TIME: Back-to-Office Pressure Is Creating a Crisis for Long COVID Patients. “Millions of people in the U.S. have chronic illnesses or physical disabilities, and advocates have been calling for better workplace accommodations and federal disability policies since well before the pandemic. But two big changes in the workforce—an alarming number of newly disabled adults in the U.S. (many of them likely long-haulers) and millions of open jobs that need to be filled—may finally force companies to become more accommodating.”

Lifehacker: How to Get Live Subtitles on Your FaceTime Calls

Lifehacker: How to Get Live Subtitles on Your FaceTime Calls. “Have you ever wanted live subtitles during your FaceTime calls? Navi, a companion app for FaceTime, lets you add it on your iPhone, iPad, and your Mac, too. The app makes clever use of Apple’s SharePlay feature to show you live subtitles during your video calls with your friends, yet another good reason to use FaceTime.”

Good E-Reader: New Overdrive Libby app update offers enhanced accessibility options

Good E-Reader: New Overdrive Libby app update offers enhanced accessibility options . “OverDrive said they have introduced some changes to the Libby app that are aimed at making it more accessible to all users, including those with visual, motor, or cognitive deficiencies. The company said they have taken inputs directly from those with visual defects – low vision to even blind individuals – thanks to their association with Fable to ensure the updates introduced to the Libby app makes it even more accessible to those with special needs.”

RVA Hub: Library of Virginia launches Virginia’s Deaf Cultural Digital Library Website

RVA Hub: Library of Virginia launches Virginia’s Deaf Cultural Digital Library Website. “The Library of Virginia is pleased to present Virginia’s Deaf Culture Digital Library…. a website with resources and information for the commonwealth’s Deaf community. A collaboration between the Central Rappahannock Regional Library and the Library of Virginia, the Deaf Culture Digital Library was established in 2021 after a two-year review and development process that included interviews with Deaf community members and research into Virginia resources for the Deaf.”

TechRadar: Half of top websites fail to meet Google usability standards

TechRadar: Half of top websites fail to meet Google usability standards. “Many of the world’s top websites do not provide the ideal user experience (UX), both on desktop and mobile platforms, at least not by Google’s standards, a new report from Searchmetrics has found The company recently analyzed the top 100 most visible websites on Google.com and found that by Google’s benchmarks, 50% don’t deliver a good desktop page experience, while 44% fail to do the same on the mobile platform.”

Breaking News Ireland: Irish start-up campaigns to build world’s largest database of accessibility information

Breaking News Ireland: Irish start-up campaigns to build world’s largest database of accessibility information. “Irish start up Access Earth has launched a public investment campaign to build the world’s largest database of accessibility information. The database would include maps of towns and community spaces which would help people with disabilities access the areas more safely and with stronger confidence. It is estimated that 15 per cent of the world’s population is registered as having a disability, with Europe being home to 135 million people with disabilities.”