Australian Network on Disability: How to write more accessible social media posts

Australian Network on Disability: How to write more accessible social media posts. “In this article, we’ll focus on how you can make your posts more accessible on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. We haven’t focused on the accessibility of the platforms themselves; we know that all these platforms are actively working to make the experience more accessible for people with disability. We’ve focused on the steps you can take to ensure people experiencing ongoing, temporary or situational impairment or disability can read your posts and engage with you on their social media platform of choice.” Fairly in-depth, with lots of resources listed. Well done.

BBC: My disabled son’s amazing gaming life in the World of Warcraft

BBC: My disabled son’s amazing gaming life in the World of Warcraft. “Robert and Trude mourned what they thought had been a lonely and isolated life for their disabled son. But when Mats died, they discovered that people all over Europe lit candles in his memory.” Before you read this make sure you have some tissues handy.

Project Sidewalk: A Web-based Crowdsourcing Tool for Collecting Sidewalk Accessibility Data at Scale (University of Washington)

University of Washington (also a PDF file): Project Sidewalk: A Web-based Crowdsourcing Tool for Collecting Sidewalk Accessibility Data at Scale. “We introduce Project Sidewalk, a new web-based tool that enables online crowd workers to remotely label pedestrian related accessibility problems by virtually walking through city streets in Google Street View. To train, engage, and sustain users, we apply basic game design principles such as interactive onboarding, mission-based tasks, and progress dashboards. In an 18-month deployment study, 797 online users contributed 205,385 labels and audited 2,941 miles of Washington DC streets. “

Piss on pity: How a new archive captures the radical spirit of the Disability Arts Movement (The Independent)

The Independent: Piss on pity: How a new archive captures the radical spirit of the Disability Arts Movement. “Although a highly successful protest group, the Disability Arts Movement is also inspiring because it brought together a wealth of people from Britain’s creative communities – from comedians and film directors to sculptors and artists. Set up to raise awareness, provoke social discussion and dispel the myth that disabled people want or need to be pitied, it was quite simply ahead of its time. And with the launch of the million-pound archive later this year – and its digital arm this month – this radical protest movement is now taking its place in the spotlight.”

Universiteit Leiden: NWO KIEM Grant for the Digital Disability Archive

Universiteit Leiden: NWO KIEM Grant for the Digital Disability Archive. “In aging societies people are living longer, raising the likelihood that they will experience disabilities. Disability history is an underutilized source for generating solutions to this societal challenge. The consortium will develop a research hub for collaborative projects and a scholarly article evaluating the design and reuse of disability heritage to address this challenge. The Disability Digital Archive (DDA) will be a virtual hub for the collection and interpretation of experiences of disability, past and present, by students, researchers, disability service organizations, and the creative industries.”