FEMA Releases National Risk Index: New Online Data Shows Natural Hazards Risks for Communities (FEMA)

FEMA: FEMA Releases National Risk Index: New Online Data Shows Natural Hazards Risks for Communities. “FEMA announced the Phase 1 rollout of the National Risk Index, a new online resource that helps illustrate communities most at risk from natural hazards. This online mapping application analyzes risk factors from 18 natural hazards. Additionally, to provide a holistic view of community risk, the application includes expected annual losses, social vulnerability and community resilience layers.”

Texas Advanced Computing Center: Disaster Database Is Go-To Hub For Natural Hazard Information

New-to-me, from Texas Advanced Computing Center: Disaster Database Is Go-To Hub For Natural Hazard Information. “The Seattle mega-quake scenario is one of hundreds of data sets published on DesignSafe, a database for natural disaster information created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin that has changed how planners, builders, policymakers and engineers prepare for and respond to hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and more. The data repository gives researchers the ability to formally publish data sets related to natural disaster studies in the same way research papers are published in journals, giving them an accessible digital home.”

WBTV: Hurricane season preparation includes some coronavirus considerations this year

WBTV: Hurricane season preparation includes some coronavirus considerations this year. “North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper has declared this week as Hurricane Preparedness Week across the state. The typical hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30, although tropical systems can occur outside those parameters as well. The governor’s advice is to use this week to talk about emergency plans with family members, update any emergency supplies and make sure your insurance is up to date. With the threat of coronavirus still out there, the governor also said evacuation plans should include an idea to stay at a hotel or inland with friends and family as emergency shelters may not be able to maintain much social distancing.”

Phys .org: How do I include my pets in my family’s emergency planning for COVID-19?

Phys .org: How do I include my pets in my family’s emergency planning for COVID-19?. “The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has created a helpful toolkit on how to include pets in preparedness planning for house fires, natural disasters, and other emergencies. I recommend reviewing the AVMA’s pet-evacuation kit checklist for a list of items to have on hand—and stocking up on two weeks’ worth of food, water, medicines, flea and tick prevention, kitty litter (if needed), and cleaning supplies for your pet.”

MakeUseOf: How You Can Prepare for Winter Storms With These Apps and Websites

MakeUseOf: How You Can Prepare for Winter Storms With These Apps and Websites. “What if you still want to go out and enjoy the season in this bad weather? Is there any way to avoid those bad roads without becoming a hermit during the colder winter months? Here’s how to use technology to avoid winter storms, ranging from apps to websites.” Advanced users won’t find anything new here, but good basics to share.

Arizona State University: ASU professors to help Gulf Coast communities assess climate risks

Arizona State University: ASU professors to help Gulf Coast communities assess climate risks. “Melanie Gall, research professor and co-director of the Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security at ASU, and Natasha Mendoza, associate professor in the School of Social Work, are working with researchers from eight other institutions to create a new information platform that will tell residents the likelihood that they’ll face a weather disaster and how much it might cost to avoid it. The work is made possible by a $3.4 million grant from the Gulf Research Program, which is funded by settlements from the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil spill in 2010.”

Getty Iris: After the Fire, Getty Works to Protect Hillsides and Neighbors

Getty Iris: After the Fire, Getty Works to Protect Hillsides and Neighbors. “Less than 24 hours after the fire began, Getty had a post-fire mitigation team on the ground, working with contractors to stabilize the steep terrain and install state-of-the-art steel barriers across the canyons. The barriers act like large metal nets to collect falling rocks, partially burned brush, tree stumps and limbs and other debris loosened by the fire. Water can pass through the nets, but large objects cannot move downhill toward homes.”

The Getty Iris: Getty Center Safe and Secure after Mass Efforts in Getty Fire

The Getty Iris: Getty Center Safe and Secure after Mass Efforts in Getty Fire . “Dozens of news media reported on the fire, taking particular interest in Getty fire prevention measures. The Getty Center is well protected from fire due to its construction and architecture, with our 1.5 million feet of travertine stone walls and floors, cement and steel construction, and stone on rooftops that prevents wind-blown embers from igniting. Additional fire-prevention measures include water storage on-site to provide for grounds irrigation.” That on-site water storage includes a million-gallon water tank.

The Hamilton Spectator: Canadian libraries and museums prepare for natural disasters, digital threats

The Hamilton Spectator: Canadian libraries and museums prepare for natural disasters, digital threats. “As Brazil mourns the loss of irreplaceable artifacts after a fire ravaged the collection at its national museum, Canadian archivists say some of this country’s heritage treasures could also be at risk. Cara Krmpotich, director of the University of Toronto’s museum studies program, said dangers like earthquakes, flooding, and forest fires have made emergency preparedness a priority for Canada’s archival spaces, but funding for infrastructure can be hard to come by.”

Slate: Museums Are Just About the Only Places Ready for the Next Natural Disaster

Slate: Museums Are Just About the Only Places Ready for the Next Natural Disaster. “…as once-rare storms like these become more common and more consequential (Sandy caused an estimated $70 billion in damage, behind only Hurricane Katrina), coastal communities are reorienting to a world where they might be underwater at a moment’s notice. And museums are leading the charge when it comes to bolstering up in the face of extreme weather—after all, financially speaking, they might have the most to lose. Along the Eastern Seaboard, from Miami to Manhattan, curators are going to extremes to safeguard their art. And in doing so, they’re testing out ideas and processes that might later be adopted by everyone else who lives on the coast.”