University of Southern Mississippi: “War Stories” Project to Capture the Experiences of National Guard Soldiers’ Service in Global War on Terror

University of Southern Mississippi: “War Stories” Project to Capture the Experiences of National Guard Soldiers’ Service in Global War on Terror. “A new initiative of the Dale Center for the Study of War and Society at The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) will capture and preserve the oral and written story of Mississippi’s National Guard and its service in America’s 21st century military exploits, including the Global War on Terror and managing recovery operations following Hurricane Katrina.”

University of California Riverside: When disaster strikes, a search website for first responders will save lives

University of California Riverside: When disaster strikes, a search website for first responders will save lives. “When Mount Vesuvius erupted almost 2,000 years ago, it took hours for a single message from Pompeii to reach rescuers 18 miles away. Today we have the opposite problem during disasters: too much rapid information from many sources, with consequences just as fatal for some people. Engineers at the University of California, Riverside are working to change this with a tool that searches real-time text, photo and video from social media and surveillance cameras alongside data from sensors, like fire detectors and security alarms. With the tool, for example, firefighters could search the terms ‘fire’ and ‘crowds’ in a particular location and time and receive data from multiple sources.”

ReliefWeb: British Red Cross launches new online knowledge-sharing platform

ReliefWeb: British Red Cross launches new online knowledge-sharing platform. “The hub is a free online platform with over 300 resources, providing a ‘one stop shop’ for anyone mainstreaming community engagement and accountability. Materials range from a ready-to-download three-day training package, to a toolkit designed to help set up and manage complaint and feedback mechanisms in any context.”

Beware: Fake Twitter accounts exploit emergencies to spread misinformation (University of California, Irvine)

University of California, Irvine: Beware: Fake Twitter accounts exploit emergencies to spread misinformation. “When earthquakes, firestorms or hurricanes strike, people often turn to Twitter for instant updates from government agencies, news outlets and neighbors. But user beware: networks of automated fake Twitter accounts, or ‘bots,’ exploit exactly these emergency situations to spread propaganda or misinformation, says University of California, Irvine sociology graduate student Richard Gardner.”

Digital Trends: A.I. cameras could help stomp out wildfires before they become disastrous

Digital Trends: A.I. cameras could help stomp out wildfires before they become disastrous. “This summer marks one year since California’s deadliest and most destructive wildfire season ever. And while not for a second diminishing the devastation caused by that disaster, it’s not an isolated event. Many countries around the world are experiencing unprecedented heat waves, which pose similar fire risks. Could cutting-edge technology help?”

MIT Technology Review: Crowdsourced reports could save lives when the next earthquake hits

MIT Technology Review: Crowdsourced reports could save lives when the next earthquake hits. “In Japan and California, huge networks of sensors and seismic stations can alert citizens to an earthquake. But these networks are expensive to install and maintain. Earthquake-prone countries such as Mexico and Indonesia don’t have such an advanced or widespread system. A cheap, effective way to help close this gap between countries might be to crowdsource earthquake reports and combine them with traditional detection data from seismic monitoring stations. The approach was described in a paper in Science Advances today.”

CNN: FEMA shared 2.3 million disaster survivors’ personal information with contractor

CNN: FEMA shared 2.3 million disaster survivors’ personal information with contractor . “Millions of hurricane and wildfire survivors are learning that they’re at ‘increased risk of identity theft and fraud’ because the Federal Emergency Management Agency shared their banking and other private information. The Department of Homeland Security inspector general said Friday that FEMA had unlawfully disclosed the private data of 2.3 million survivors with a federal contractor that was helping them find temporary housing.”