National Science Foundation: Researchers develop dashboard to track invasive and vector mosquitoes

National Science Foundation: Researchers develop dashboard to track invasive and vector mosquitoes. “Researchers at the University of South Florida, funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, created the Global Mosquito Observations Dashboard to surveil mosquito-borne diseases with automated mosquito identification. The dashboard makes use of data from other apps that use citizen scientists to capture photos of mosquitoes. The approach offers international data on a scale otherwise prohibitive due to expense and logistics.”

Texas A&M Today: Study Shows Flies, Roaches Not Likely To Spread COVID-19

Texas A&M Today: Study Shows Flies, Roaches Not Likely To Spread COVID-19. “Insects like biting flies and cockroaches are not likely to spread the agent of COVID-19 to humans, according to a recently published article by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists. Public health experts and officials now know much more about the spread of COVID-19, but concerns remained about how the virus spreads indirectly from human to human through contaminated surfaces, animals or insects.”

Chicago Tribune: Large portion of suburban Chicago is back to ‘medium’ COVID-19 risk; city expected to follow

Chicago Tribune: Large portion of suburban Chicago is back to ‘medium’ COVID-19 risk; city expected to follow. “The risk of contracting COVID-19 in suburban Cook County and other parts of the Chicago area has jumped to the “medium” level under the latest national guidelines, officials announced Friday. As of Thursday, suburban Cook County recorded more than 200 positive cases per 100,000 residents, tipping that region into the next level of coronavirus transmission under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s latest metrics. Lake and DuPage counties have also newly returned to medium risk. The statewide case rate was 193 per 100,000 residents as of Friday.”

Reuters: Omicron sub-variant makes up 23.1% of COVID variants in U.S. – CDC

Reuters: Omicron sub-variant makes up 23.1% of COVID variants in U.S. – CDC. “The BA.2 sub-variant of Omicron was estimated to be 23.1% of the coronavirus variants circulating in the United States as of March 12, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Tuesday. Scientists are tracking a rise in cases caused by BA.2, which is spreading rapidly in parts of Asia and Europe.”

MIT Technology Review: What researchers learned from deliberately giving people covid

MIT Technology Review: What researchers learned from deliberately giving people covid. “The 36 volunteers, all aged 18 to 30, were exposed to a low dose of the original SARS-CoV-2 virus in the nose, the equivalent of the amount found in just a single drop of nasal fluid. Half the participants developed covid symptoms; they became infectious within just two days, with levels of infectious virus peaking at five days. It has previously been estimated that the time from exposure to first symptoms was about five days. Participants in the study remained infectious for an average of nine days and still had detectable levels of virus in their nose 12 days after initial exposure.”

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 can remain active for longer than recommended quarantine period, study shows

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 can remain active for longer than recommended quarantine period, study shows. “In a 38-year-old man who manifested mild symptoms of COVID-19 for 20 days, the novel coronavirus continued to be detected in his organism and to undergo mutations for 232 days. If he had not been given continuous medical care, maintained social distancing and worn a mask, he could have spread the virus throughout these seven months.”

University of Central Florida: Face Masks Cut Distance Airborne Pathogens Could Travel in Half, New Study Finds

University of Central Florida: Face Masks Cut Distance Airborne Pathogens Could Travel in Half, New Study Finds. “In a study appearing today in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, the researchers found that face masks reduce the distance airborne pathogens could travel, when speaking or coughing, by more than half compared to not wearing a mask. The findings are important as airborne viral pathogens, such as SARS-CoV-2, can be encapsulated and transmitted through liquid droplets and aerosols formed during human respiratory functions such as speaking and coughing.”

WJRT: University of Michigan study shows mask mandates at schools show lower COVID transmission rates

WJRT: University of Michigan study shows mask mandates at schools show lower COVID transmission rates. “New data from the University of Michigan and the state health department shows Michigan students who attended schools with mask requirements at the beginning of the school year, had lower rates of coronavirus transmission than those at schools without mandates. The rate of infection reached an average of about 45 cases per 100 thousand students by late September in school districts with mask mandates. Virus spread was 62% higher in school districts without mask rules- where the infection rate averaged 73 cases per 100 thousand students by late September.”

University of Exeter: One in ten people may still be infectious for COVID after ten days, new research indicates

University of Exeter: One in ten people may still be infectious for COVID after ten days, new research indicates. “One in 10 people may have clinically relevant levels of potentially infectious SARS-CoV-2 past the 10 day quarantine period, according to new research. The study, led by the University of Exeter and funded by Animal Free Research UK, used a newly adapted test which can detect whether the virus was potentially still active.”

Cornell Chronicle: Faster checkouts could reduce virus spread at stores

Cornell Chronicle: Faster checkouts could reduce virus spread at stores. “[Professor Jamol] Pender specializes in queuing theory – essentially the science of waiting in lines. His research has sought to ease traffic congestion, help driverless vehicles navigate and minimize the wait for rides at Disney World. So he turned his attention to a similar kind of queueing and set out to model the probability of how often pairs of shoppers might overlap in a store – an approach that could be used to predict the transmission of COVID-19, and guide strategies to reduce its spread.”

Washington Post: Nothing said Cairo quite like the ever-present water pipe — until Egypt banned them to fight covid

Washington Post: Nothing said Cairo quite like the ever-present water pipe — until Egypt banned them to fight covid. “Egypt is one of several countries in the Middle East, including Lebanon, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, where shisha bans have been enforced during the pandemic. The popular pipes, also known as hookahs and narghiles, are often passed between friends, potentially transmitting the virus. But while some other countries have gradually lifted restrictions, Egyptian authorities have maintained their crackdown. Photos published in state-run media depict the aftermath of raids, the pipes lined up in rows like criminals. This month, photos showed a front loader running over 76 shishas laid on a street in a city north of Cairo.”

KENS: Yes, a person can still transmit COVID-19 more than five days after their first positive COVID-19 test

KENS: Yes, a person can still transmit COVID-19 more than five days after their first positive COVID-19 test. “Yes, a person can still be contagious more than five days after their first positive COVID-19 test. While studies suggest people are most contagious shortly before and shortly after symptoms first begin, studies have consistently found a person can be contagious for up to 10 days after their first positive test.”