Salt Lake Tribune: How the coronavirus spreads in those everyday places we visit

Salt Lake Tribune: How the coronavirus spreads in those everyday places we visit. “One London School of Hygiene analysis suggested that 80% of the secondary transmissions were caused by just 10% of infected people. In other words, if you want to avoid getting COVID-19, one of your major focuses should be avoiding a superspreading event. So as Utahns leave their homes and reengage with society, we thought now would be a good time to scour the research to note where these events have been documented and where they haven’t. We can also learn about the circumstances that led to each superspreading event, and do our best to avoid them.”

Harvard School of Public Health: COVID-19 transmission among workers considerable during early outbreaks

Harvard School of Public Health: COVID-19 transmission among workers considerable during early outbreaks. “Workplace transmission of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 likely played a substantial role in the local spread of the disease during the early stages of the outbreak in six Asian countries, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The majority of the possible work-related cases occurred in occupations outside of health care, according to the study.”

Dutch farm worker contracted coronavirus from mink: agriculture minister (WHTC)

WHTC: Dutch farm worker contracted coronavirus from mink: agriculture minister. “A person who worked on a farm where mink are bred to export their fur contracted the coronavirus from the animals, the Dutch Agriculture Minister said in a letter to parliament on Wednesday. Outbreaks on mink farms in the Netherlands were first reported in April, when keepers noticed some animals having difficulty breathing, prompting a wider investigation.”

Washington Post: Virus ‘does not spread easily’ from contaminated surfaces or animals, revised CDC website states

Washington Post: Virus ‘does not spread easily’ from contaminated surfaces or animals, revised CDC website states. “The coronavirus primarily spreads from person to person and not easily from a contaminated surface. That is the takeaway from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which this month updated its ‘How COVID-19 Spreads’ website. The revised guidance now states, in headline-size type, ‘The virus spreads easily between people.’ It also notes that the coronavirus, which causes the disease covid-19, ‘is spreading very easily and sustainably between people.'”

CNBC: Wearing a mask can significantly reduce coronavirus transmission, study on hamsters claims

CNBC: Wearing a mask can significantly reduce coronavirus transmission, study on hamsters claims. “As the debate over the effectiveness of wearing masks during a pandemic continues, a new study gives weight to arguments by medical professionals and government leaders that wearing a mask does indeed reduce virus transmission — and dramatically so. Experiments by a team in Hong Kong found that the coronavirus’ transmission rate via respiratory droplets or airborne particles dropped by as much as 75% when surgical masks were used.”

CNN: Staying safe isn’t just about hygiene and distance. It’s about time, too.

CNN: Staying safe isn’t just about hygiene and distance. It’s about time, too.. “By now, you’ve likely heard the main pieces of advice to avoid the coronavirus. Wear a mask. Wash your hands with soap. Stay at least 6 feet from others. If you do gather with others, go outside rather than inside. Still, there’s one more aspect to infection that has received less attention. Growing evidence suggests that Covid-19 infection, like with other illnesses, is related to prolonged time exposed to the virus. The longer you stay in an environment that may contain the virus, the higher the risk of getting sick.”

Berkeley Lab: New Research Launched on Airborne Virus Transmission in Buildings

Berkeley Lab: New Research Launched on Airborne Virus Transmission in Buildings. “As society prepares to reopen indoor spaces and ease back into some sense of normalcy during the COVID-19 pandemic, a team of researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is launching a study of the risk of airborne transmission of viruses within buildings and how to mitigate those risks.”