Mashable: Hackers can spoof presidential alerts to incite mass panic, researchers warn

Hoo boy. Mashable: Hackers can spoof presidential alerts to incite mass panic, researchers warn. “Remember that emergency Presidential Alert system that made everyone’s phone obnoxiously buzz last year? It turns out hackers can spoof these alerts with relatively little effort, according to a terrifying new paper that warns the flaw could result in mass panic.”

The New York Times: Russia Sought to Use Social Media to Influence E.U. Vote, Report Finds

The New York Times: Russia Sought to Use Social Media to Influence E.U. Vote, Report Finds. “European authorities blamed Russian groups on Friday for disinformation campaigns designed to depress turnout and sway public opinion in last month’s European Union elections, an official accounting that underscored how Russian interference has not abated and that Facebook and other tech platforms remain vulnerable to meddling.”

Newswise: Study explores how gossip spreads in social networks

Newswise: Study explores how gossip spreads in social networks. “Researchers studying the spread of infectious diseases and transmission of information have developed a model that elucidates the reasons why some news propagates through social networks before there is time to corroborate the facts. Their results, which may also help marketing companies target specific social groups, appear online at arXiv.org.”

University of Washington: Allen School and AI2 researchers unveil Grover, a new tool for fighting fake news in the age of AI

University of Washington: Allen School and AI2 researchers unveil Grover, a new tool for fighting fake news in the age of AI. “To fight the emerging threat of fake news authored by AI, a team of researchers at the Allen School and Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) developed Grover, a new model for detecting neural fake news more reliably than existing technologies can.”

Ars Technica: Researchers discover “Fishwrap” influence campaign recycling old terror news

Ars Technica: Researchers discover “Fishwrap” influence campaign recycling old terror news. “Researchers at Recorded Future have uncovered what appears to be a new, growing social media-based influence operation involving more than 215 social media accounts. While relatively small in comparison to influence and disinformation operations run by the Russia-affiliated Internet Research Agency (IRA), the campaign is notable because of its systematic method of recycling images and reports from past terrorist attacks and other events and presenting them as breaking news—an approach that prompted researchers to call the campaign ‘Fishwrap.'”

Ubergizmo: WhatsApp Warns Of Legal Action Against Abusers Of Its Platform

Ubergizmo: WhatsApp Warns Of Legal Action Against Abusers Of Its Platform. “Facebook-owned WhatsApp is the most popular cross-platform messaging service in the world. Operating at that scale presents its own set of challenges. The company has had to take several steps to ensure that its platform isn’t abused and not used for the spread of misinformation. WhatsApp is now threatening legal action against even those who merely claim that they have the ability to abuse its platform as many companies have emerged who claim to be able to do just that.”

Poynter: Number of fact-checking outlets surges to 188 in more than 60 countries

Poynter: Number of fact-checking outlets surges to 188 in more than 60 countries. “The number of fact-checking outlets around the world has grown to 188 in more than 60 countries amid global concerns about the spread of misinformation, according to the latest tally by the Duke Reporters’ Lab.”