CNET: Facebook will fight fake news with real newspaper ads (and more)

CNET: Facebook will fight fake news with real newspaper ads (and more). “Facebook is continuing its fight against fake news with three new initiatives, the company said on Wednesday. The first is a news literacy campaign that offers tips on how to identify fake news, as well as information on what the social network is doing to combat the issue. The information will show up at the top of News Feed and in print ads, beginning in the US and then spreading to other countries over the next few months, the company said.”

MIT Technology Review: The US military is funding an effort to catch deepfakes and other AI trickery

MIT Technology Review: The US military is funding an effort to catch deepfakes and other AI trickery. “The Department of Defense is funding a project that will try to determine whether the increasingly real-looking fake video and audio generated by artificial intelligence might soon be impossible to distinguish from the real thing—even for another AI system. This summer, under a project funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the world’s leading digital forensics experts will gather for an AI fakery contest. They will compete to generate the most convincing AI-generated fake video, imagery, and audio—and they will also try to develop tools that can catch these counterfeits automatically.”

Make Tech Easier: 5 Useful Tools to Help You Spot Fake News

Make Tech Easier: 5 Useful Tools to Help You Spot Fake News. “In March of 2018 a group of MIT data scientists published a study which found that that humans and bots share fake news on Twitter at about the same rate, but the robots aren’t necessarily outsmarting us – we’re just playing along. The study, among other findings, showed that false news spread up to six times more quickly than real news and that it spread to more people: the top 1% of fake news reached 1,000 to 100,000 people, while real news rarely went above 1,000. If you want to keep your social media profile credible, though, there are some steps you can take to double-check your news.”

Washington Post: Fake Facebook accounts and online lies multiply in hours after Santa Fe school shooting

Washington Post: Fake Facebook accounts and online lies multiply in hours after Santa Fe school shooting. “In the first hours after the Texas school shooting that left at least 10 dead Friday, online hoaxers moved quickly to spread a viral lie, creating fake Facebook accounts with the suspected shooter’s name and a doctored photo showing him wearing a ‘Hillary 2016’ hat. Several were swiftly flagged by users and deleted by the social network. But others rose rapidly in their place: Chris Sampson, a disinformation analyst for a counterterrorism think tank, said he could see new fakes as they were being created and filled out with false information, including images linking the suspect to the anti-fascist group Antifa.”

The Conversation: War on fake news could be won with the help of behavioral science

The Conversation: War on fake news could be won with the help of behavioral science. “Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently acknowledged his company’s responsibility in helping create the enormous amount of fake news that plagued the 2016 election – after earlier denials. Yet he offered no concrete details on what Facebook could do about it. Fortunately, there’s a way to fight fake news that already exists and has behavioral science on its side: the Pro-Truth Pledge project.”

Eurasia Review: What’s Trending In Fake News? New Tool Shows What Stories Go Viral And If Bots Are To Blame

Eurasia Review: What’s Trending In Fake News? New Tool Shows What Stories Go Viral And If Bots Are To Blame. “Researchers at the Indiana University Observatory on Social Media have launched upgrades to two tools playing a major role in countering the spread of misinformation online. The improvements to Hoaxy and Botometer are supported by the Knight Prototype Fund on Misinformation, a joint venture of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Rita Allen Foundation and the Democracy Fund to address concerns about the spread of misinformation and to build trust in quality journalism. A third tool — an educational game designed to make people smarter news consumers — also launches with the upgrades.”

Recently-Released Russian Facebook Ads Now Available in CSV Format

From Twitter: the recently-released Russian Facebook ads are now available as a CSV file. From the Tweet: “The recently released Russian Facebook ads dataset was all in PDF format. One of our volunteers, @scottcame, has extracted the content and made it available as a CSV on @datadotworld.”