Poynter: We’re launching a podcast about fact-checking and misinformation

Poynter: We’re launching a podcast about fact-checking and misinformation. “Who is fact-checking for? How can reporters avoid amplifying bogus claims? And is fact-checking even the best way to fight online fakery? These are some of the biggest questions facing the ongoing battle against misinformation. And starting today, we’re tackling them in audio form.”

Politico: EU to ask Facebook, Twitter, Google for monthly ‘fake news’ reports

Politico: EU to ask Facebook, Twitter, Google for monthly ‘fake news’ reports. “The European Commission is planning to ask social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter and Google for monthly reports on Russian disinformation campaigns ahead of the European election next May, two EU officials told POLITICO.”

WhatsApp: WhatsApp’s first ever TV commercial warns against fake news in India

The Next Web: WhatsApp’s first ever TV commercial warns against fake news in India. “WhatsApp has faced a lot of criticism for the way it’s handled fake news in India. In its latest move to battle misinformation, the company has launched three TV commercials in India to spread awareness about the issue amongst its users in the country.”

Nieman Lab: CrossCheck launches in Nigeria, with 16 newsrooms working together to fight misinformation

Nieman Lab: CrossCheck launches in Nigeria, with 16 newsrooms working together to fight misinformation. “Facebook is used by 24 million Nigerians every month, but the platform has only four people, from third-party fact-checking organizations, working to combat misinformation there, BBC Africa Eye reported earlier this year in an investigation into how fake news in the country has led to violence and murder.”

Poynter: Hyperpartisan Facebook groups are the next big challenge for fact-checkers

Poynter: Hyperpartisan Facebook groups are the next big challenge for fact-checkers. “[Jonathan] Albright, director of the Digital Forensics Initiative at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, spent months digging into the analytics of Facebook posts, political ads and private groups to determine how the platform was influencing the election. The result is a three-part analysis of misinformation on the social media platform, which he published days before the United States midterms earlier this month. Three months and 1,000 screenshots later, he found that, while the technology company has made strides in limiting the spread of misinformation over the past couple of years, there’s still plenty of fakery on the platform.”

Quartz: One of the first two Muslim women in US Congress is already battling a fake news campaign

Quartz: One of the first two Muslim women in US Congress is already battling a fake news campaign. “The Democratic candidate was resoundingly elected with over 78% of the vote in Minnesota’s 5th congressional district, and along with Rashida Tlaib, a Palestinian-American from Michigan, is poised to become one of two first Muslim women serving in Congress come January. But as busy as Ilhan [Omar]’s been on readying for Capitol Hill, so has the digital sphere where stories of misinformation are being peddled about her, some of which have gone viral on social media platforms.”

Quartz: Africans are being exposed to “fake news” at a higher rate than Americans

Quartz: Africans are being exposed to “fake news” at a higher rate than Americans. “The rise of false information has complex cultural and social reasons. Until now, though, the phenomenon has been studied mostly as it happens in the US and Europe, with relatively little attention to the situation in African countries. This is despite the fact that disinformation on the continent has often taken the form of extreme speech inciting violence or has spread racist, misogynous, xenophobic messages, often on mobile phone platforms such as WhatsApp. To fill the gap in information about ‘fake news’ in sub-Saharan Africa, we conducted an online survey in Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa earlier this year. Our study had three goals: to measure the prevalence of disinformation, to learn who people believe is responsible for stopping fake news, and to understand the relationship between disinformation and media trust.”