Learn how to identify and verify what you see on the web: Sign up for free online course ‘Navigating Misinformation’ (Knight Center)

Knight Center: Learn how to identify and verify what you see on the web: Sign up for free online course ‘Navigating Misinformation’. “Learning how to verify content from online sources is more important each day, especially as the amount of false content on the internet grows. The new massive open online course (MOOC) from the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas and First Draft’s Claire Wardle will arm you with the tools and skills necessary to verify online content and use it ethically in professional, published reports.”

Study: Information literacy can combat ‘fake news’ (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Study: Information literacy can combat ‘fake news’. “A new study conducted by Ohio University professor Dr. M. Laeeq Khan found that several factors can be used to predict someone’s ability to detect misinformation, otherwise known as ‘fake news,’ on social media. Additionally, the study found that, by looking at certain factors, it is also possible to predict if someone is likely to share misinformation based on the same factors.”

RTE: The toxic world of online comments and social media posts

RTE: The toxic world of online comments and social media posts. “For the past number of years, we have been trawling this murky underworld trying to understand when and how the language we use online changed from friendly debate to what the researcher Emma Jane has referred to as ‘e-bile’. The internet of today is a far cry from the early days when cyber-utopians heralded in a new era of human collaboration and communication. To them the internet was a place where individuals could come together to create helpful communities and where ‘citizen journalists’ could combat political agendas from the ground up. This cyber-utopia was going to make the offline world a better place too. So how have we got to a stage where comments sections have become no go zones for many users?”

Poynter: Forget fake news stories. False text posts are getting massive engagement on Facebook.

Poynter: Forget fake news stories. False text posts are getting massive engagement on Facebook.. “When Facebook started letting users post text on top of colored backgrounds in 2016, it seemed like a fairly benign way to get people to share more personal thoughts on the platform…. But since then, like other formats on Facebook, the text post feature has been weaponized into an effective way to spread misinformation on the platform.”

StuffNZ: A gunman killed my daughter and Google is traumatizing my family

StuffNZ: A gunman killed my daughter and Google is traumatizing my family. “It started when I searched ‘For Alison,’ the name of our nonprofit, on Google. The search returned a YouTube video posted by an anonymous conspiracy theorist alleging that our foundation was a scam. This prompted me to search our daughter’s name, which led me down a rabbit hole of painful and despicable content, including claims that Alison had plastic surgery and was living a secret life in Israel. As much as I want to blame the sick creators for the pain I feel, I blame Google even more. By surfacing this content and profiting from the data Google collects from those who view it, Google is monetising Alison’s death and our family’s pain.”

Social Media Today: YouTube tests Out New ‘Fact Checks’ on Misinformation Prone Content

Social Media Today: YouTube tests Out New ‘Fact Checks’ on Misinformation Prone Content. “YouTube continues to ramp up its efforts to rid its platform of misuse and questionable content, this time through the addition of a new ‘fact-check’ pop-up which will appear on videos relating to subjects that are prone to misinformation.”

CNN: FBI Director Wray says foreign influence campaigns targeting US have continued ‘virtually unabated’

CNN: FBI Director Wray says foreign influence campaigns targeting US have continued ‘virtually unabated’. “FBI Director Christopher Wray said Tuesday that while the US had not seen a “material impact on election infrastructure” from foreign adversaries in the recent midterm elections, foreign influence campaigns pitting Americans against each other on social media have continued ‘virtually unabated.'”