Dazed: This exhibition spotlights the next gen artists exploring fashion and race

New-to-me, from Dazed: This exhibition spotlights the next gen artists exploring fashion and race. “Kimberly M. Jenkins, a fashion educator and independent researcher, began developing an academic initiative. It began with the course ‘Fashion and Race’, which she has taught at the New School’s Parsons School of Design since Autumn 2016. ‘The first thing we do in the class is to go about discussing what race, systemic oppression, and white privilege are to set up the terms we will be relying upon in order to look at how the construction of race has shaped fashion and beauty industries,’ Jenkins explains. Driven to bring her vision to the public, Jenkins created The Fashion and Race Database Project, an online archive filled with vital source materials.”

The Verge: This online community expands visibility for female drone pilots

The Verge: This online community expands visibility for female drone pilots. “Less than 5 percent of certified drone pilots in the US are women, which is a dreary statistic that highlights the lack of women in STEM industries. The number for women who fly recreationally is likely much higher, but being FAA-certified can open up career opportunities to enter the UAV industry, a fact many likely aren’t aware of. To close the knowledge gap, Elena Buenrostro started Women Who Drone, an online community where female drone pilots, photographers, and videographers can come together and learn from each other.” This site’s apparently been around for a year but it’s new-to-me. I’m also really surprised Zoe Stumbaugh’s not on the site.

Mancunion: A Database of Beautiful People

Mancunion: A Database of Beautiful People . “A Database of Beautiful People is a blossoming YouTube series created in 2018 of personal and intimate interviews with people from around the globe. Its main purpose is to reflect genuineness through each individual’s personality and stories. It is simply an observation of ordinary people that makes us question the meaning of ordinary.” Very limited at the moment, but a fantastic idea.

Forbes: These Tools Make It Easy To Find Women And People Of Color In The Food Business

Forbes: These Tools Make It Easy To Find Women And People Of Color In The Food Business. “We often hear how hard it is to find talented women and people of color to work in the food business. These simple, smart resources are making it easier than ever to find them—and eat at their food businesses.”

San Francisco State University: New grant aims to flip stereotypes about scientists, one story at a time

San Francisco State University: New grant aims to flip stereotypes about scientists, one story at a time. “Reading through her middle schooler’s science homework one day, Kimberly Tanner noticed a glaring absence: examples of women and people of color doing science. Two years later, Tanner is part of a collaborative project to diversify the scientists featured in middle and high school science lessons, funded by a $1.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health….Over the next two years, students at San Francisco State and Foothill College will create hundreds of ‘Scientist Spotlights’ — short science assignments that highlight currently practicing scientists from a variety of backgrounds. Since the spotlights also teach important course concepts, teachers can use them in their own curricula as homework assignments or replacements for textbook readings.”

Adweek: New Database for Uncovering Female Talent in the Ad Industry Targets Junior, Mid-Level Creatives

Adweek: New Database for Uncovering Female Talent in the Ad Industry Targets Junior, Mid-Level Creatives. “A new global database aimed at unveiling female talent in the ad industry hopes to finally raise the amount of women holding creative director positions—which today remains at just around 11 percent. The site, called inVisible Creatives, is claiming to do something its predecessors, including Where Are the Boss Ladies?, didn’t: spotlight junior, mid-level and senior talent, with a particular emphasis on their work.”

Nature: Huge peer-review study reveals lack of women and non-Westerners

Nature: Huge peer-review study reveals lack of women and non-Westerners. “Women are inadequately represented as peer reviewers, journal editors and last authors of studies, according to an analysis of manuscript submissions to an influential biomedical journal. The study looked at all submissions made to the open-access title eLife from its launch in 2012 to 2017 — nearly 24,000 in total. It found that women worldwide, and researchers outside North America and Europe, were less likely to be peer reviewers, editors and last authors. The paper — which hasn’t itself yet been peer-reviewed — was posted on the preprint server bioRxiv1 on 29 August.”