STAT: Historians push to create public archive of documents from massive opioid litigation

STAT: Historians push to create public archive of documents from massive opioid litigation. “In settling lawsuits against them, companies often insist that all of the documents and depositions gathered as part of the cases be locked away or destroyed. To head that off — and to ensure a full accounting of the origins of the prescription opioid crisis — a group of historians is asking that any settlement in the massive opioid litigation require all collected documents be preserved and made public.”

CBS News: The manuscripts saved by a monk

CBS News: The manuscripts saved by a monk . “City by city, page by page, Father Columba Stewart is preserving history. The Benedictine monk has spent more than a decade traveling to some of the world’s most dangerous regions to find and preserve ancient manuscripts before they are destroyed. The centuries-old works — historical manuscripts and antique religious books — are at risk for a few reasons. Sometimes it’s moisture eroding the hand-written pages; sometimes it’s a calculated attack to erase a cultural heritage.”

Wired: Burning Memories

Wired: Burning Memories. “On Sunday night, October 8, my parents’ house in Napa burned to the ground in the wildfire. For my mom and dad, now in their eighties, the place had been a retirement escape from the hurlyburly of New York. My wife and I were married there 23 years ago, in the hillside living room looking out over a vine-carpeted valley. The fire turned this refuge into a heap of tile and ash. It also torched our family history: a mountain of scrapbooks, photo prints, and travel diaries that we will never mine again.”

Politico: National Archives warned Trump White House to preserve documents

Politico: National Archives warned Trump White House to preserve documents. “National Archives officials have periodically warned White House lawyers that the Trump administration needs to follow document preservation laws, according to people familiar with the conversations and emails reviewed by POLITICO. The White House legally must preserve all presidential records, which are given to the National Archives after the president leaves office and are used for historical records. The documents that must be preserved include written memos, emails, speeches, record logs and more.”