Derbyshire Times: Instagram star Oakley gains international attention as Derbyshire springer spaniel puppy shows correct way to wear a face mask

Derbyshire Times: Instagram star Oakley gains international attention as Derbyshire springer spaniel puppy shows correct way to wear a face mask. “Like many of us during the pandemic, twenty-seven-year-old beauty therapist Shannah Nightingale was becoming increasingly frustrated at people wearing their masks incorrectly in shops. So Shannah and her mum decided to get one-year-old pet puppy Oakley to try a mask on for some ‘cute pictures’ and to illustrate the right and many wrong ways to wear a face covering.”

US Army: AR dog goggles could help protect Soldiers

US Army: AR dog goggles could help protect Soldiers. “Through a project funded by the Small Business Innovation Research program and managed by the Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory, a new technology has been developed by Command Sight, Inc., to provide military working dogs with augmented reality goggles that allow a dog’s handler to give it specific directional commands while keeping the warfighter remote and out of sight.”

Ubergizmo: Finland Deploys COVID-19 Sniffer Dogs At The Airport

Ubergizmo: Finland Deploys COVID-19 Sniffer Dogs At The Airport. “We’ve all seen how dogs are deployed at checkpoints along the border or at airports to help sniff out drugs and other illegal substances that people should not be bringing into a country, but could sniffer dogs also be used to sniff out diseases in people, like the coronavirus? Apparently so, or that’s what Finnish researchers believe.” There’s already been quite a bit of research done into dogs sniffing out coronavirus.

Getty Iris: How an Artist Teamed up with Her Dog to Re-create Art

The Getty Iris: How an Artist Teamed up with Her Dog to Re-create Art. “Every weekday morning, Eliza Reinhardt and her creative partner, Finn, start their day at 7am by getting up, brewing a cup of coffee, and snuggling while they browse online galleries to find a work of art to re-create as part of the Getty Museum Challenge…. Finn is a three-year-old Australian shepherd, but he follows direction as carefully as an actor on a film set. ‘I really do think Finn takes this on as his daily task,’ Reinhardt said. ‘I say, “Finn, do you want to do a photo? You want to go take a picture?” And he’s ready to go.'”

Purdue University: Purdue Scientists Join in Launch of Cloud-based Canine Cancer Database to Benefit Humans and Their Best Friends

Purdue University: Purdue Scientists Join in Launch of Cloud-based Canine Cancer Database to Benefit Humans and Their Best Friends. “The National Cancer Institute has announced the development of the Integrated Canine Data Commons (ICDC), which has significant ties to the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine. Developed by the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, the cloud-based repository of spontaneously arising canine cancer data was created with the goal of advancing human cancer research by enabling comparative analysis of canine cancer.”

Washington Post: Dogs, too, can find the pandemic disorienting

Washington Post: Dogs, too, can find the pandemic disorienting. “Dogs understand a few things very well: walks, how to get treats and belly rubs, what time they get fed, and whether they are a good boy or girl (they are, all of them). They do not understand a global pandemic. Quite frankly, that’s something even their owners have trouble comprehending.”

Washington Post: Can dogs detect the novel coronavirus? The nose knows.

Washington Post: Can dogs detect the novel coronavirus? The nose knows.. “Blaze is one of nine dogs enrolled in a University of Pennsylvania study into whether dogs can detect a distinct smell in people infected with the novel coronavirus. His triumph on that early July day — selecting a can containing urine from a hospitalized coronavirus-positive patient over an array of potentially confusing alternatives — is a key step in a training process that may one day allow dogs to pick out infected individuals, including those who are asymptomatic, in nursing homes, businesses and airports, potentially screening as many as 250 people an hour.”

Exclusive: Buddy, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in the U.S., has died (National Geographic)

National Geographic: Exclusive: Buddy, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in the U.S., has died. “Medical records provided by the Mahoneys and reviewed for National Geographic by two veterinarians who were not involved in his treatment indicate that Buddy likely had lymphoma, a type of cancer, which would explain the symptoms he suffered just before his death. The Mahoneys didn’t learn that lymphoma was being considered as the probable cause of his symptoms until the day of his death, they say, when additional bloodwork results confirmed it. It’s unclear whether cancer made him more susceptible to contracting the coronavirus, or if the virus was responsible for any of his symptoms, or if it was just a case of coincidental timing. Buddy’s family, like thousands of families grappling with the effects of the coronavirus around the world, is left with many questions and few answers.”

Bloomberg: Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

Bloomberg: Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows. “Dogs with a few days of training are capable of identifying people infected with the coronavirus, according to a study by a German veterinary university. Eight dogs from Germany’s armed forces were trained for only a week and were able to accurately identify the virus with a 94% success rate, according to a pilot project led by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover. Researchers challenged the dogs to sniff out Covid-19 in the saliva of more than 1,000 healthy and infected people.”

University of Pennsylvania Almanac: Penn Vet Launches COVID-19 Canine Scent Detection Study

University of Pennsylvania Almanac: Penn Vet Launches COVID-19 Canine Scent Detection Study. “A pilot training program using scent detection dogs to discriminate between samples from COVID-19 positive and COVID-19 negative patients is the focus of a new research initiative at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet).”

NBC News: Pug in North Carolina tests positive for coronavirus, may be first for dog in U.S.

NBC News: Pug in North Carolina tests positive for coronavirus, may be first for dog in U.S.. “A pug in North Carolina has tested positive for the coronavirus, which may the the first such case for a dog in the U.S. The dog, Winston, was part of a Duke University study in which a whole family in Chapel Hill, the McCleans, were tested for the virus. The mother, father, son, and pug tested positive, while the daughter, another dog and a cat tested negative, according to NBC affiliate WRAL in Raleigh.”

CountryLiving: New app tells you if your dog is getting enough exercise during lockdown

CountryLiving: New app tells you if your dog is getting enough exercise during lockdown. “The Work Out Your Walkies calculator enables owners to enter the breed of their dog, their dog’s age, and the dimensions of their garden or outdoor space. Once the information has been filled in, the app calculates the exact number of garden laps their dog needs to do each day based on recommended expert guidelines.”

Routine and learning games: How to make sure your dog doesn’t get canine cabin fever (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Routine and learning games: How to make sure your dog doesn’t get canine cabin fever. “Staying home and not socializing your dogs, most notably puppies, risks them becoming afraid of unfamiliar people and other dogs. This, combined with a being in an urban environment for a long time, relative inactivity, and sub-optimal training activities, could set up a COVID-19 generation of dogs who aren’t equipped for urban and suburban living. And considering the biggest killer of dogs under three years old is behavioral euthanasia, it’s important to take steps to enrich your dog’s environment.”

House Beautiful: There’s a new Instagram account dedicated to dogs working from home during the coronavirus crisis

House Beautiful: There’s a new Instagram account dedicated to dogs working from home during the coronavirus crisis. “Created during the onset of the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, the new account features pups from all around the world and shows how they have been adjusting to having their owners at home with them. From wearing office attire (tie and glasses), to navigating a laptop, it proves this one thing: it’s not only us adults who have been adjusting to a temporary new workspace.”