Good Housekeeping: Can’t Stop Doomscrolling? These Apps Actually Get You to Unplug Before Bedtime

Good Housekeeping: Can’t Stop Doomscrolling? These Apps Actually Get You to Unplug Before Bedtime. “These free apps can be installed on your phone (and in some cases, as a web extension) to either forcefully block access to social media sites, or provide un-ignorable notifications that it’s time to put the phone down. If you’re finding yourself ‘doomscrolling’ on a frequent basis, these apps can help break the habit before the new year arrives.”

Elemental: What Doomscrolling Does to the Brain

Elemental: What Doomscrolling Does to the Brain. “We’re taking in more media than ever. And often, that means reading or watching gloomy story after gloomier story, or, as New York Times tech columnist Kevin Roose called it back in March, ‘doomsurfing.’ Taken together, this is a dangerous formula. Consuming too much bad news on your phone or the TV can be harmful — studies find it’s bad for your physical and mental health — and the constant bombardment only raises the risk.”

Science Blog: ‘Endless Doomscroller’ Asks What Compels Us To Keep Scrolling Through Bad News

Science Blog: ‘Endless Doomscroller’ Asks What Compels Us To Keep Scrolling Through Bad News. “The bad news seems endless. And as part of Ben Grosser’s latest project, it truly is. ‘The Endless Doomscroller’ is a constant stream of headlines, endlessly scrolling, that tell us ‘Cases Surging,’ ‘Panic Rising,’ ‘Global Crisis Looms’ and ‘Experts Say It’s Never Getting Better.’ Grosser – a professor in the School of Art and Design and the co-founder of the Critical Technology Studies Lab at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign – describes the project as ‘an endless stream of doom, without all the specifics.'”

Lifehacker: How to Quit Your Doomscrolling Habit

Lifehacker: How to Quit Your Doomscrolling Habit. “If you’re someone who reaches for your phone as soon as you wake up (other than to turn off the alarm), you may find yourself scrolling through your newsfeed or social media channels out of habit. It can start out innocently enough: quizzes to find out which Golden Girl you are, pictures of your friends’ kids drawing on the walls, and recipes for a one-pot meal you’ll think about making for dinner but never will. But in this year of never-ending doom, it’s hard to avoid all the bad news—primarily because it just keeps coming.”

CTV: How to know if you’re ‘doomscrolling’ and why you should stop

CTV: How to know if you’re ‘doomscrolling’ and why you should stop. “It was 1:36 a.m. on a Tuesday, about two weeks after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic, when Canadian journalist Karen Ho asked her Twitter followers to try putting down their phones. ‘You can always keep doomscrolling tomorrow,’ wrote Ho, a global finance and economics reporter for Quartz. By doomscrolling, Ho was referring to the act of reading the seemingly endless stream of upsetting news headlines that emerge on social media in times of distress. She’d seen the term used before, but she hadn’t seen it applied to the pandemic.”