New York Times: This Deal Helped Turn Google Into an Ad Powerhouse. Is That a Problem?

New York Times: This Deal Helped Turn Google Into an Ad Powerhouse. Is That a Problem?. “Google owns the world’s leading search engine, it operates the largest video-hosting service in YouTube, and its popular web browser, email, map and meeting software is used by billions of people. But its financial heft — the source of nearly all its enormous profits — is advertising. And perhaps no day was more pivotal in transforming Google into a powerhouse across the entire digital advertising industry than April 13, 2007, when the company clinched a deal to buy DoubleClick for $3.1 billion.”

ProPublica: Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking

ProPublica: Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking. “When Google bought the advertising network DoubleClick in 2007, Google founder Sergey Brin said that privacy would be the company’s ‘number one priority when we contemplate new kinds of advertising products.’ And, for nearly a decade, Google did in fact keep DoubleClick’s massive database of web-browsing records separate by default from the names and other personally identifiable information Google has collected from Gmail and its other login accounts. But this summer, Google quietly erased that last privacy line in the sand – literally crossing out the lines in its privacy policy that promised to keep the two pots of data separate by default.”