Coronavirus Australia: How The Wiggles help save life of Covid 19 patient with Down syndrome (New Zealand Herald)

New Zealand Herald: Coronavirus Australia: How The Wiggles help save life of Covid 19 patient with Down syndrome. “Sarah Kelly, who has Down syndrome, was in the intensive care unit with Covid-19, struggling to breathe. However, The Wiggles’ fan kept refusing to have oxygen tubes put in As her condition began to deteriorate rapidly, ICU nurse Steven Moylan, who had witnessed Kelly watching the group on her iPad regularly, took it upon himself to track them down and ask them for help.”

Miami Herald: People with intellectual disabilities can get COVID vaccination help from new website

Miami Herald: People with intellectual disabilities can get COVID vaccination help from new website. “People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) — such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and autism — have faced significant hurdles during the pandemic involving education, employment and mental and physical health…. To combat what experts deem a public health concern, the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities launched a website on Wednesday to help guide people with IDD to trusted resources on COVID-19 vaccines, particularly where to find one in their area.”

London Free Press: Local inclusion champion lends voice to Google’s Down syndrome project

London Free Press: Local inclusion champion lends voice to Google’s Down syndrome project. “Matthew MacNeil, 29, an inclusion champion who’s appeared before the United Nations as an advocate, is helping Google in partnership with the Canadian Down Syndrome Society (CDSS) to better understand the voices of people with Down syndrome. Known as Project Understood, people with Down syndrome are being urged to record thousands of phrases, often misheard because they have different facial skeletal and muscular systems, to make Google Assistant more accessible.”

Huffington Post: New Website Helps People with Disabilities After Hurricanes Harvey and Irma

Huffington Post: New Website Helps People with Disabilities After Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. “People with communication disabilities, such as ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), Down syndrome, aphasia caused by a stroke, and some forms of cerebral palsy and autism, are the most vulnerable during and after disasters like Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. In many cases, these individuals get separated from their helpers, lose access to their speech-generating devices and their low-tech tools, and get relocated to places where they are unable to receive the proper support. The United States Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (USSAAC), a 501©(3) non-profit established in the 1980s, has launched two websites… to help people with disabilities and their families who have been affected by Harvey and Irma.”