NJ .com: New tool lets you see if there’s lead in the water at your school

NJ .com: New tool lets you see if there’s lead in the water at your school. “For parents who want to know if there is lead in the water at their kid’s school, finding the answer is now a little bit easier. On Thursday, the New Jersey Department of Education launched a new website to serve as a centralized database with information about lead testing in Garden State schools.”

EurekAlert: NUS engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes

EurekAlert: NUS engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes. “A team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a highly sensitive system that uses a smartphone to rapidly detect the presence of toxin-producing algae in water within 15 minutes. This invention can generate test results on-site, and findings can be reported in real-time using the smartphone’s wireless communications capabilities.”

PR Newswire: The Lead in School Drinking Water Database (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: The Lead in School Drinking Water Database (PRESS RELEASE). “The Lead In School Water Project is the first web-based application to rank and track every US state in terms of school-related lead exposure, testing and policy. This project’s goal is to provide a free public resource for parents, facility managers and regulators to monitor the latest data on their school’s waterborne lead concentrations.”

‘There’s No Safe Level of Lead:’ Vermont Schools, Day Care Centers Undergoing Wave of Lead Tests (NECN)

NECN: ‘There’s No Safe Level of Lead:’ Vermont Schools, Day Care Centers Undergoing Wave of Lead Tests. “With a sweeping round of statewide lead tests now underway at Vermont schools and day care centers, some faucets and drinking fountains are getting failing grades….Wednesday, state health and environmental leaders unveiled a new website where families can check on lead levels in their kids’ drinking water sources.”

Democrat & Chronicle: Worried about your drinking water? A new site may provide some relief

Democrat & Chronicle: Worried about your drinking water? A new site may provide some relief. “Have questions about the quality of your drinking water? The state launched a new website that may provide some answers. New York’s Health and Environmental Conservation departments on Friday launched … a map-based website that allows New Yorkers to find their nearest public drinking water system and view annual water quality reports.”

EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One (Environmental Working Group)

EWG: EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One. “The known extent of contamination of American communities with the toxic fluorinated compounds known as PFAS continues to grow at an alarming rate, with no end in sight. As of March 2019, at least 610 locations in 43 states are known to be contaminated, including drinking water systems serving an estimated 19 million people.”

State of Michigan: New Study Guide Enables Educators to Teach the Lessons of Flint

State of Michigan: New Study Guide Enables Educators to Teach the Lessons of Flint. “‘Here’s to Flint.’ With that line, the city of Flint officially shut off the water flowing from Detroit and shifted to pulling its drinking water from the Flint River. The date was April 25, 2014. Five years later, the Michigan Department of Civil Rights has released a new study guide designed to help educators teach the lessons of the Flint water crisis.”

The Atlantic: How a Feel-Good AI Story Went Wrong in Flint

The Atlantic: How a Feel-Good AI Story Went Wrong in Flint. “More than a thousand days after the water problems in Flint, Michigan, became national news, thousands of homes in the city still have lead pipes, from which the toxic metal can leach into the water supply. To remedy the problem, the lead pipes need to be replaced with safer, copper ones. That sounds straightforward, but it is a challenge to figure out which homes have lead pipes in the first place. The City’s records are incomplete and inaccurate. And digging up all the pipes would be costly and time-consuming. That’s just the kind of problem that automation is supposed to help solve.”

Thames Water: New 150-year digital archive captures growth of London

Thames Water: New 150-year digital archive captures growth of London. “Thousands of never-before-seen images documenting Thames Water’s past and the growth of London are now available to the public after a mammoth archiving project. The historic photographs of iconic and critical sites, including Walthamstow reservoirs, Abbey Mills pumping station and Beckton sewage works, from across the capital span almost a century, from 1886 to 1976, and can be downloaded for free.”

Fair Warning: New Lookup to Tell You What’s in Your Water

Fair Warning: New Lookup to Tell You What’s in Your Water. “Want to know what hazards might be lurking in your local water supply? An updated online database launched today by the Environmental Working Group, a research and advocacy organization, provides some answers. The online resource is known as the EWG’s Tap Water Database. It lists contaminants as well as their levels and likely sources, and any federal drinking water violations by local water utilities. Consumers, after typing in their zip code, get a detailed analysis based on testing from 2010 through 2015.”

Residents of New York Have a New Tool To Learn About Their Drinking Water

Residents of the state of New York have a new option to learn about their drinking water. “The What’s In My Water tool includes information about contaminants found through state and federal laboratory testing, and the location and nature of some potential threats to local drinking water. The map is searchable by zip code and maps.”