Radio Canada International: Google searches may affect your reaction to a drug, suggests study

Radio Canada International: Google searches may affect your reaction to a drug, suggests study. “A new study suggests that people who do internet searches on the side-effects of a medication are more likely to report intolerance to the drug. Researchers say this suggests that searching the web could be the culprit for triggering these side effects and not the medication itself. This particular study involved statins, the drugs that lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.”

NPR: How Social Media Can Reveal Overlooked Drug Reactions

NPR: How Social Media Can Reveal Overlooked Drug Reactions. “When Allison Ruddick was diagnosed with stage 3 colorectal cancer in October 2014, she turned to the world of hashtags. After her initial diagnosis it wasn’t clear if the cancer had metastasized, so she was in for a nerve-wracking wait, she says. She wanted outside advice. ‘But they don’t really give you a handbook, so you search kind of anywhere for answers,’ Ruddick says. ‘Social media was one of the first places I went.’ Under the hashtags #colorectalcancer and #nevertooyoung on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, other patients were sharing a fuller picture of their experience with cancer treatments.”

FDA: FDA improves access to reports of adverse drug reactions

FDA: FDA improves access to reports of adverse drug reactions. “The new dashboard enables users to search for and organize data by criteria such as drug/biological product, age of the patient, type of adverse event, year the adverse event occurred, or within a specific timeframe. In addition to making it easier for consumers to search for adverse events reported with drug or biologic products, the FDA hopes the increased transparency will spur the submission of more detailed and complete reports from consumers, health care professionals and others, by making it easier for people to see other reports that the FDA receives, and search the database for similar observations.”