EurekAlert: AI finds 9 potential COVID-19 drugs that can be used on humans immediately

EurekAlert: AI finds 9 potential COVID-19 drugs that can be used on humans immediately. “Gero, the leader in AI-driven drug discovery, has used its AI platform to identify the potential anti-COVID-19 drugs. Six of them have been approved, three were withdrawn, and the other nine have been already tested in clinical trials for other indications. The emergency of the situation, as well as the legal and regulatory status of these agents, make it possible to start immediate clinical trials for most of the suggested drugs.”

BuzzFeed News: A Woman With Lupus Said Her Health Care Provider Is Stopping Her Chloroquine Prescription And Thanked Her For The “Sacrifice”

BuzzFeed News: A Woman With Lupus Said Her Health Care Provider Is Stopping Her Chloroquine Prescription And Thanked Her For The “Sacrifice”. “A 45-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) said she received an online message from her health care provider stating it will no longer refill her vital hydroxychloroquine prescriptions because that drug is being used to treat the “critically ill with COVID-19,” the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. The letter thanked her for her ‘sacrifice.’ Dale, who lives in the Los Angeles area and asked to only be identified by her first name, told BuzzFeed News she ‘started crying’ upon receiving the message from her doctor’s office on Tuesday.”

Slate: Why We Can’t Just Let People Try Drugs That Might Treat COVID-19

Slate: Why We Can’t Just Let People Try Drugs That Might Treat COVID-19. “We have been here before. I worked with Dr. Anthony Fauci at the National Institutes of Health in the early days of AIDS, when many HIV-infected people demanded access to drugs for which there was little to no good data on their effects. This population faced a very high risk of rapid death, unlike the COVID-19 patients—yet some of them recognized that the best hope to control this horrible infection was the conduct of rigorous controlled studies that would actually show what worked and what didn’t. That approach ultimately led to the discovery of drugs that changed AIDS from a death sentence to a chronic disease but one that would not necessarily shorten life.”

Treatments for COVID-19: Drugs being tested against the coronavirus (LiveScience)

LiveScience: Treatments for COVID-19: Drugs being tested against the coronavirus. ” As of Friday (March 20), 86 clinical trials of COVID-19 treatments or vaccines that are either ongoing or recruiting patients. New ones are being added every day, as the case count in the U.S. (and globally) skyrockets. The drugs being tested range from repurposed flu treatments to failed ebola drugs, to malaria treatments that were first developed decades ago. Here, we take a look at several of the treatments that doctors hope will help fight COVID-19.”

The Guardian: Anti-inflammatories may aggravate Covid-19, France advises

The Guardian: Anti-inflammatories may aggravate Covid-19, France advises. “The country’s health minister, Olivier Véran, who is a qualified doctor and neurologist, tweeted on Saturday: ‘The taking of anti-inflammatories [ibuprofen, cortisone … ] could be a factor in aggravating the infection. In case of fever, take paracetamol. If you are already taking anti-inflammatory drugs, ask your doctor’s advice.'”

University of Liverpool: New traffic light system to help prescribers navigate coronavirus response

University of Liverpool: New traffic light system to help prescribers navigate coronavirus response. “The University of Liverpool launched a new website featuring a traffic light system to aid the safe prescribing of experimental drugs being trialled against coronavirus (COVID-19). The site, created by the University’s Liverpool Drug Interactions Group, provides vital information on whether or not combinations of an experimental drug and co-medications are safe to prescribe.”

Facebook has a prescription: More pharmaceutical ads (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Facebook has a prescription: More pharmaceutical ads. “Jordan Lemasters keeps seeing ads in his Facebook app for an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug called Vyvanse. When the Chicago-based audio branding consultant recently clicked on the ad’s drop-down menu and selected ‘Why Am I Seeing This Ad,’ a pop-up said it was because of his age range, because he lives in the United States and because he may have visited Vyvanse.com. But Lemasters felt spooked. The 29-year-old had used another ADHD drug, Adderall, but never publicized it.”