Duke COVID-19 cases surge; fraternities blamed for many (AP)

AP: Duke COVID-19 cases surge; fraternities blamed for many. “The vast majority of the 231 new cases reported from March 8 through Sunday occurred within the university’s undergraduate student population, which accounts for only about 0.06% of North Carolina’s population of 10.5 million people, but whose cases account for nearly 1.9% of the total number reported statewide last week. A total of 241 cases were reported during the entire fall semester.”

The Technology 202: New Duke paper calls Washington to increase transparency around online political ads (Washington Post)

Washington Post: The Technology 202: New Duke paper calls Washington to increase transparency around online political ads. “Major social platforms put new limits on political ads in the run-up to the controversial 2020 election due to concerns they amplify misinformation. But a new Duke University paper published today says a persistent lack of transparency in online political ads is preventing researchers from studying how that changed campaign spending, or impacted individual campaigns.”

Los Angeles Times: Duke University schools the country on how to stay open during the COVID-19 pandemic

Los Angeles Times: Duke University schools the country on how to stay open during the COVID-19 pandemic. “Duke University is sometimes referred to as a pretty good knock-off of fancier schools farther north. But while those ivy-clad universities with smart students, prestigious medical schools and big endowments stayed closed this fall, Duke invited its freshmen, sophomores, some upperclassmen and all of its graduate students to its Durham, N.C., campus for largely in-person classes. Now, it’s schooling those sniffier schools on how to reopen safely.”

Duke University Chronicle: Duke announces no fans at home events to begin winter sport seasons

Duke University Chronicle: Duke announces no fans at home events to begin winter sport seasons. “There will be no fans in Cameron Indoor Stadium to begin the basketball season. Per a release Tuesday morning, Duke Athletics announced that the school will be extending its current policy for fall sports and not allow any spectators at home events to begin the winter sport seasons due to COVID-19.”

Duke Global Health Institute: New Tool Can Help Gauge COVID-19 Transmission Risk in Classrooms

Duke Global Health Institute: New Tool Can Help Gauge COVID-19 Transmission Risk in Classrooms. “If you’re heading back to work in a lab, classroom or office, or to live in a dorm room this semester, you’re probably feeling some level of concern about virus transmission. A new tool developed by Duke researchers may help faculty, students and staff who plan to return to campus to assess COVID-19 transmission risk if they’re sharing space with others. Created by Prasad Kasibhatla, John Fay, Elizabeth Albright and DGHI’s William Pan, with help from Jose Jimenez, a professor of chemistry at the University of Colorado, the tool predicts airborne concentrations of the virus and the odds of transmission from microscopic infectious airborne particles (referred to as aerosols), the developers said.”

Duke University Libraries: Putting the ‘Global’ Back Into Global Pandemic, Part I

Duke University Libraries: Putting the ‘Global’ Back Into Global Pandemic, Part I. “In order to help foster a more informed and compassionate approach to the current global health crisis, the subject specialists of Duke Libraries’ International and Area Studies Department have decided to devote a series of blog posts to the topic of plagues, epidemics, and pandemics in each of the world regions for which they collect materials and about which they offer reference and library instruction. Our goal is not to provide exhaustive coverage of the topic, but merely to suggest one or two resources—preferably those available online and in English—that each subject specialist has found particularly meaningful or useful in helping him or her to understand the role that infectious diseases have played in the countries, continents, and world areas for which s/he is responsible.”

Duke Today: Duke Creates Open-source Protective Respirator

Duke Today: Duke Creates Open-source Protective Respirator. “A protective respirator created by a Duke University medical and engineering task force is now being used by Duke Health doctors as they treat patients with suspected cases of COVID-19. In an effort to combat the worldwide shortage of protective medical equipment, Duke is making the design widely available as an open-source design.”

Duke University Medical Center Library & Archives: COVID-19 Core Clinical Resources Libguide

Duke University Medical Center Library & Archives: COVID-19 Core Clinical Resources Libguide. “COVID-19: Core Clinical Resources is a compilation of information and literature about COVID-19 that will be immediately useful to practicing clinicians at Duke. Please understand that this guide is also fluid and evolving since the topic is evolving rapidly, with an onslaught of literature and information.”

Duke University Libraries Preservation Underground: Working From Home Options for Conservation Labs

Duke University Libraries Preservation Underground: Working From Home Options for Conservation Labs. “As the Covid-19 virus spreads, we have started planning for work that Conservation staff can do at home should we be told to stay off campus. As of this publication we have not been asked to stay home but preservation professionals prepare for the worst and hope for the best. This has been a thought provoking exercise and everyone has contributed to our brainstorming. We wanted to share what we have drafted to date in case any other labs are in a similar situation.”

WRAL Tech Wire: Duke University is new home for Consumer Reports archives

WRAL Tech Wire: Duke University is new home for Consumer Reports archives. “Duke announed Monday that the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library has incorporated the materials – enough to fill two tractor trailers. There is so much information – books, photographs, artifacts – that Duke says its staff will need ‘three to four years’ to catalog it all.”

Duke University Digitizes Women’s Handbooks

I found out yesterday on Twitter that Duke digitized its collection of women’s handbooks. From the about page: “The Social Standards Committee, part of the Woman’s Student Government Association, was responsible for developing standards of behavior for all students attending Duke’s Woman’s College (1930-1972). These handbooks, issued each year to each student, provided guidelines on dress, etiquette, and comportment for Woman’s College students both on and off campus.” Learn about that inhuman monster Sloppy Jo, who goes downtown in anklets.. and without a hat! Also, I learned that pin curlers in public are a social faux pas that can completely destroy your life. Or something.

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?. “Some stories are too good to forget. With almost formulaic accuracy, elements from classic narratives are constantly being reused and retained in our cultural consciousness, to the extent that a room of people who’ve never read Romeo and Juliet could probably still piece out its major plot points. But when stories are so pervasive, how can we tell what’s original and what’s Shakespeare with a facelift? This summer, three Duke undergraduate students in the Data+ summer research program built a computer program to find reused stories.”

Story+: Where Humanities Students Combine Creative Storytelling And Research (Duke Today)

Duke Today: Story+: Where Humanities Students Combine Creative Storytelling And Research. “This year, [Jerusha] Neal serves as supervisor for three undergrads with co-supervisor Peace Lee, a Duke Divinity School Th.D. candidate. The team is recovering sermons from women preachers and analyzing the connections between their rhetoric and identities…. With Duke Chapel Records Digital collection, the team will analyze more than 250 sermons from women preachers between the years of 1972 and 2001. At Duke Chapel, at least five to 10 sermons were preached by women a year. “