Duke University Libraries: Putting the ‘Global’ Back Into Global Pandemic, Part I

Duke University Libraries: Putting the ‘Global’ Back Into Global Pandemic, Part I. “In order to help foster a more informed and compassionate approach to the current global health crisis, the subject specialists of Duke Libraries’ International and Area Studies Department have decided to devote a series of blog posts to the topic of plagues, epidemics, and pandemics in each of the world regions for which they collect materials and about which they offer reference and library instruction. Our goal is not to provide exhaustive coverage of the topic, but merely to suggest one or two resources—preferably those available online and in English—that each subject specialist has found particularly meaningful or useful in helping him or her to understand the role that infectious diseases have played in the countries, continents, and world areas for which s/he is responsible.”

Duke Today: Duke Creates Open-source Protective Respirator

Duke Today: Duke Creates Open-source Protective Respirator. “A protective respirator created by a Duke University medical and engineering task force is now being used by Duke Health doctors as they treat patients with suspected cases of COVID-19. In an effort to combat the worldwide shortage of protective medical equipment, Duke is making the design widely available as an open-source design.”

Duke University Medical Center Library & Archives: COVID-19 Core Clinical Resources Libguide

Duke University Medical Center Library & Archives: COVID-19 Core Clinical Resources Libguide. “COVID-19: Core Clinical Resources is a compilation of information and literature about COVID-19 that will be immediately useful to practicing clinicians at Duke. Please understand that this guide is also fluid and evolving since the topic is evolving rapidly, with an onslaught of literature and information.”

Duke University Libraries Preservation Underground: Working From Home Options for Conservation Labs

Duke University Libraries Preservation Underground: Working From Home Options for Conservation Labs. “As the Covid-19 virus spreads, we have started planning for work that Conservation staff can do at home should we be told to stay off campus. As of this publication we have not been asked to stay home but preservation professionals prepare for the worst and hope for the best. This has been a thought provoking exercise and everyone has contributed to our brainstorming. We wanted to share what we have drafted to date in case any other labs are in a similar situation.”

WRAL Tech Wire: Duke University is new home for Consumer Reports archives

WRAL Tech Wire: Duke University is new home for Consumer Reports archives. “Duke announed Monday that the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library has incorporated the materials – enough to fill two tractor trailers. There is so much information – books, photographs, artifacts – that Duke says its staff will need ‘three to four years’ to catalog it all.”

Duke University Digitizes Women’s Handbooks

I found out yesterday on Twitter that Duke digitized its collection of women’s handbooks. From the about page: “The Social Standards Committee, part of the Woman’s Student Government Association, was responsible for developing standards of behavior for all students attending Duke’s Woman’s College (1930-1972). These handbooks, issued each year to each student, provided guidelines on dress, etiquette, and comportment for Woman’s College students both on and off campus.” Learn about that inhuman monster Sloppy Jo, who goes downtown in anklets.. and without a hat! Also, I learned that pin curlers in public are a social faux pas that can completely destroy your life. Or something.

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?. “Some stories are too good to forget. With almost formulaic accuracy, elements from classic narratives are constantly being reused and retained in our cultural consciousness, to the extent that a room of people who’ve never read Romeo and Juliet could probably still piece out its major plot points. But when stories are so pervasive, how can we tell what’s original and what’s Shakespeare with a facelift? This summer, three Duke undergraduate students in the Data+ summer research program built a computer program to find reused stories.”

Story+: Where Humanities Students Combine Creative Storytelling And Research (Duke Today)

Duke Today: Story+: Where Humanities Students Combine Creative Storytelling And Research. “This year, [Jerusha] Neal serves as supervisor for three undergrads with co-supervisor Peace Lee, a Duke Divinity School Th.D. candidate. The team is recovering sermons from women preachers and analyzing the connections between their rhetoric and identities…. With Duke Chapel Records Digital collection, the team will analyze more than 250 sermons from women preachers between the years of 1972 and 2001. At Duke Chapel, at least five to 10 sermons were preached by women a year. “

Duke Chronicle: How to curb loneliness and increase happiness using social media

Duke Chronicle: How to curb loneliness and increase happiness using social media. “The Center for Advanced Hindsight—an applied behavioral science research center at Duke—is partnering with a new social media app called Wisdo to better understand how online platforms can contribute to more positive online engagement. Duke’s analysis into Wisdo contributes to the Center’s larger mission to conduct research that has a direct impact on people’s lives, especially in promotion of healthy behaviors. “

Yorkton This Week: Technology near for real-time TV political fact checks

Yorkton This Week: Technology near for real-time TV political fact checks. “A Duke University team expects to have a product available for election year that will allow television networks to offer real-time fact checks onscreen when a politician makes a questionable claim during a speech or debate. The mystery is whether any network will choose to use it.”

Duke University: Blocher and Miller compile comprehensive historical gun law database

Duke University: Blocher and Miller compile comprehensive historical gun law database. “Professors Joseph Blocher and Darrell Miller have spearheaded the creation of a comprehensive database of historic gun laws for use as a research tool for scholars, litigators, journalists, and others interested in current debates surrounding firearms regulation and the Second Amendment. The searchable Repository of Historical Gun Laws compiles English statutes from the Middle Ages through 1776 and those in the United States from the Colonial era to the middle of the 20th century. To date, it includes 1,514 regulations, searchable by subject area, date range, and jurisdiction.”

Duke University: Interactive Transcripts have Arrived!

Duke University: Interactive Transcripts have Arrived!. “This week Duke Digital Collections added our first set of interactive transcripts to one of our newest digital collections: the Silent Vigil (1968) and Allen Building Takeover (1969) collection of audio recordings. This marks an exciting milestone in the accessibility efforts Duke University Libraries has been engaged in for the past 2.5 years. Last October, my colleague Sean wrote about our new accessibility features and the technology powering them, and today I’m going to tell you a little more about why we started these efforts as well as share some examples.”

Duke: What Could Have Entered the Public Domain on January 1, 2018? Under the law that existed until 1978 . . . Works from 1961

Duke University: What Could Have Entered the Public Domain on January 1, 2018? Under the law that existed until 1978 . . . Works from 1961 . “Current US law extends copyright for 70 years after the date of the author’s death, and corporate ‘works-for-hire’ are copyrighted for 95 years after publication. But prior to the 1976 Copyright Act (which became effective in 1978), the maximum copyright term was 56 years—an initial term of 28 years, renewable for another 28 years. Under those laws, works published in 1961 would enter the public domain on January 1, 2018, where they would be ‘free as the air to common use.’ Under current copyright law, we’ll have to wait until 2057.1 And no published works will enter our public domain until 2019. The laws in other countries are different—thousands of works are entering the public domain in Canada and the EU on January 1.”

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web . “For fields like environmental science, collecting data is hard. Gathering results on a single project can mean months of painstaking measurements, observations and notes, likely in limited conditions, hopefully to be published in a highly specialized journal with a target audience made up mostly of just other specialists in the field. That’s why when, this past summer, Duke students Devri Adams, Camila Restrepo and Annie Lott set out with Professor Emily Bernhardt to combine over six decades of data on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest into a workable, aesthetically pleasing visualization website, they were really breaking new ground in the way the public can appreciate this truly massive store of information.”

Duke University: Kenan’s Human Rights Center unveils database to track collaborative initiatives on business and human rights

Duke University: Kenan’s Human Rights Center unveils database to track collaborative initiatives on business and human rights. “The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics has helped launch a new database that tracks multi-stakeholder initiatives, voluntary initiatives that involve some form of collaboration between governments, NGOs, and private companies, aimed at improving businesses’ treatment of, and respect for, human rights. The goal of the project is to increase public understanding of an emerging source of international standards for responsible business and government conduct.”