Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?. “Some stories are too good to forget. With almost formulaic accuracy, elements from classic narratives are constantly being reused and retained in our cultural consciousness, to the extent that a room of people who’ve never read Romeo and Juliet could probably still piece out its major plot points. But when stories are so pervasive, how can we tell what’s original and what’s Shakespeare with a facelift? This summer, three Duke undergraduate students in the Data+ summer research program built a computer program to find reused stories.”

Story+: Where Humanities Students Combine Creative Storytelling And Research (Duke Today)

Duke Today: Story+: Where Humanities Students Combine Creative Storytelling And Research. “This year, [Jerusha] Neal serves as supervisor for three undergrads with co-supervisor Peace Lee, a Duke Divinity School Th.D. candidate. The team is recovering sermons from women preachers and analyzing the connections between their rhetoric and identities…. With Duke Chapel Records Digital collection, the team will analyze more than 250 sermons from women preachers between the years of 1972 and 2001. At Duke Chapel, at least five to 10 sermons were preached by women a year. “

Duke Chronicle: How to curb loneliness and increase happiness using social media

Duke Chronicle: How to curb loneliness and increase happiness using social media. “The Center for Advanced Hindsight—an applied behavioral science research center at Duke—is partnering with a new social media app called Wisdo to better understand how online platforms can contribute to more positive online engagement. Duke’s analysis into Wisdo contributes to the Center’s larger mission to conduct research that has a direct impact on people’s lives, especially in promotion of healthy behaviors. “

Duke University: Kenan’s Human Rights Center unveils database to track collaborative initiatives on business and human rights

Duke University: Kenan’s Human Rights Center unveils database to track collaborative initiatives on business and human rights. “The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics has helped launch a new database that tracks multi-stakeholder initiatives, voluntary initiatives that involve some form of collaboration between governments, NGOs, and private companies, aimed at improving businesses’ treatment of, and respect for, human rights. The goal of the project is to increase public understanding of an emerging source of international standards for responsible business and government conduct.”

Duke University: New Tools Safeguard Census Data About Where You Live And Work

Duke University: New Tools Safeguard Census Data About Where You Live And Work. “A team led by Duke University, in collaboration with the Census Bureau, has developed new methods that enable people to learn as much as possible from Census data and other government workforce statistics for things like disaster management, policy-making and funding decisions, while guaranteeing that no one can trace the data back to your household or business.”

New Web Site Aggregates Voting Records for Congressional Reps Since 2009

A new Web site lets you check the voting records for US Congress representatives since 2009 and hopefully fact-check claims made in races for Congressional seats. “The iCheck database contains votes for every member of the House and Senate since 2009, spanning more than 2.5 million votes and tens of thousands of bills. The site integrates data from multiple sources, including GovTrack.us and a legislative tracking service called Congressional Quarterly. Visitors to the iCheck site can look up a specific senator or representative from their state and see how often their legislator voted with the president’s position or the majority votes for each party, as well as how those alignments compare with other members of Congress.”