Boing Boing: Download these free D&D character sheets designed to help players with dyslexia

Boing Boing: Download these free D&D character sheets designed to help players with dyslexia. “Redditor Inuyasharuls is a Dungeon Master who runs campaigns for several players with dyslexia. With help from another Redditor and gamer, Axelle123, they created this colorful character sheet alternative, using Comic Sans instead of the standard font found on D&D materials, to make life easier for everyone. Or, well, maybe not everyone, but still for some people.”

Irish Examiner: New website helps people with dyslexia improve reading

Irish Examiner: New website helps people with dyslexia improve reading. “Computer science student Kevin Cogan created the platform so it can be adapted to suit an individual’s needs. The software can be downloaded as a Google Chrome extension so that dyslex.ie can be used across all sites and online scripts.” Not entirely free; there is a premium version that unlocks all features, but according to the article it starts at a modest €2 a month (about $2.25 USD.)

How-To Geek: Fonts and Browser Extensions That Help Those with Dyslexia Read the Web

How-To Geek: Fonts and Browser Extensions That Help Those with Dyslexia Read the Web. “Dyslexia is a learning condition characterized by difficulties with reading and, to a lesser extent, writing. As the web is full of written content, the right fonts and extensions can make consuming digital content much easier for those with dyslexia.”

Pacific Standard: Charting The Rich History Of Dyslexia Advocacy

Pacific Standard: Charting The Rich History Of Dyslexia Advocacy. “The History of Dyslexia, unveiled in July, is a website that aims to make the fruits of about 140 years of dyslexia research available to the public…. It’s a joint project of an interdisciplinary group of four professors at Oxford University, who specialize in history, psychology, and education policy. So far, their project features a timeline of key events, a collection of oral interviews, and an online archive containing documents, photographs, and oral histories.”

Neowin: Microsoft aims to expand trial that found OneNote can improve learning for dyslexic students

Neowin: Microsoft aims to expand trial that found OneNote can improve learning for dyslexic students. “The British Dyslexia Association (BDA) carried out a limited, small-scale trial at Knowl Hill School in Surrey, England to explore the use of OneNote in assisting students with different learning abilities. The 11-week trial program found that OneNote’s Immersive Reader, which can read out text shown on screen – including the student’s own writing – had a significant and positive effect on the learning experience.”