Quartz: The emails that brought down Enron still shape our daily lives

Quartz: The emails that brought down Enron still shape our daily lives. “The Enron Corpus, as the collection is known, has been used in more than 100 projects since that research team presented it to the public in 2004. As the biggest public collection of natural written language in an organizational setting, it has been used to study everything from statistics to artificial intelligence to email attachment habits. An online art project by two Brooklyn artists will send every single one of the emails to your personal inbox, a process which (depending on the frequency of emails you request) will take anywhere from seven days to seven years.”

Ever used VFEmail? No? Well, chances are you never will now: Hackers wipe servers, backups in ‘catastrophic’ attack (The Register)

The Register: Ever used VFEmail? No? Well, chances are you never will now: Hackers wipe servers, backups in ‘catastrophic’ attack. “A hacker wiped every server and backup of VFEmail this week in a ‘catastrophic’ attack, according to the webmail service. VFEmail admins detailed the network intrusion on Monday in a grim red-letter update on the site’s front page. The service’s founder Rick Romero also said it’s likely the webmail outfit is toast as a result of the ransacking.”

Virginia Memory: Library Makes New Batch Of Emails From Governor Timothy M. Kaine Administration Available Online

Virginia Memory: Library Makes New Batch Of Emails From Governor Timothy M. Kaine Administration Available Online. “The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the release of 100,343 emails from the administration of Governor Timothy M. Kaine (2006-2010). This latest batch comprises emails from individuals in the offices of Kaine’s Secretary of Health and Human Resources, Secretary of Finance, Secretary of Transportation, and Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry. Included are the email boxes of Connie Biggs, Robert Bloxom, Richard ‘Ric’ Brown, Craig Burns, Heidi Dix, Nicholas Donohue, Manju Ganeriwala, Alleyn Harned, Gail Jaspen, Aryana Khalid, Barbara Reese, Marilyn Tavenner, Michael Tutor, and Jody Wagner. Since January 2014, the Library has made 283,901 emails from the Kaine administration freely available online to the public.”

Hack Your Gmail: A Quick Start For Google App Scripting (Hackaday)

Hackaday: Hack Your Gmail: A Quick Start For Google App Scripting. “Google provides a lot of features with all of its products, but however you slice it, all the code runs on their servers out of your reach. Sort of. If you know JavaScript, you can use Google Apps Script to add features to many Google products including Gmail. If you’ve used Office scripting, the idea is the same, although obviously the implementation is very different. With scripting you can make sophisticated filters that would be very hard to do otherwise. For example, monitor for suspicious messages like those with more than 4 attachments, or that appear to come from a contact between the hours of 2AM and 5AM. For our example today, I’m going to show you something that is easy but also highly useful.”

Lifehacker: Why You Should Treat Your Email Like Another Social Media Feed

Lifehacker: Why You Should Treat Your Email Like Another Social Media Feed. “If you have a public-facing email address, wading through the unrelated PR pitches in your inbox can be a full-time job in itself. There aren’t enough hours in the day to keep up with every message you receive, so stop beating yourself up for falling behind and embrace the chaos instead.”

(Don’t) Return to Sender: How to Protect Yourself From Email Tracking (EFF)

EFF: (Don’t) Return to Sender: How to Protect Yourself From Email Tracking. “For users, there are usually ways to ‘opt out’ of tracking within your email client of choice. For mail client developers, including a few simple features can help protect your users’ privacy by default. And if you’re at an organization that does perform tracking, you can take a proactive approach to respecting user privacy and consent. Here are some friendly suggestions to help make tracking less pervasive, less creepy, and less leaky.”

The Elephant In The Room: Artificial Intelligence Used To Process Governor Tim Kaine’s E-Mails (Virginia Memory)

Virginia Memory: The Elephant In The Room: Artificial Intelligence Used To Process Governor Tim Kaine’s E-Mails. “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. For the past seven years, that’s how we’ve been tackling the task of processing the 1.5 million e-mails transferred to the Library of Virginia in 2010 as part of the electronic records of outgoing Governor Tim Kaine. When Kaine announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate in 2011, the Library challenged itself to make the Kaine administration’s e-mail records available for research in time for the 2012 election. What did that entail? Basically, we had to figure out how to separate whatever portion of those 1.5 million e-mails shouldn’t be included in our online collection—either because they aren’t records of enduring value (think e-mails announcing doughnuts in the break room) or because they contain sensitive materials such as attorney-client privileged communications, privacy-protected information, or operational security details.”