Digital Inspiration: Search your Handwritten Notes with Gmail OCR

Digital Inspiration: Search your Handwritten Notes with Gmail OCR. “Gmail text search has always been very capable but some might not know that Gmail, like Evernote, also performs OCR on images contained in email messages. When you perform searches inside Gmail or Google Inbox, the results always contain matching images that contain the search keywords. I tried Gmail OCR search against different types of images and the results were fairly good. Text recognition in Gmail works for both image attachments as well as inline embedded images.”

CBR Online: Hackers cast out 300% more phishing attacks via messages

CBR Online: Hackers cast out 300% more phishing attacks via messages . “There has never been a time when more cybersecurity caution has been required when traversing the online world, with the volume of messages carrying malicious phishing payloads spiking by a massive 300 per cent. Emails and messages are not the only dangerous delivery methods employed by hackers when phishing for unsuspecting users, social media accounts are also being used as vehicles to instigate attacks. Since the third quarter of 2017, a 70 per cent increase in phishing links in social media accounts was recorded by security specialist, Proofpoint, also responsible for noting the massive rise in message based attacks.”

Digital Trends: Here’s how to send a text from your email account

Digital Trends: Here’s how to send a text from your email account. “Despite the fact that just about everyone can read their email on their smartphone, there will always be times and situations in which it is more advantageous to send a short email as a text. This is particularly useful if you’re emailing a non-smartphone user, need to send a text when you’re away from your phone, or want to use a text for branding purpose.”

Ars Technica: How Hotmail changed Microsoft (and email) forever

A good read for us old people: How Hotmail changed Microsoft (and email) forever. “Twenty years ago this week, on December 29, 1997, Bill Gates bought Microsoft a $450 million late Christmas present: a Sunnyvale-based outfit called Hotmail. With the buy—the largest all-cash Internet startup purchase of its day—Microsoft plunged into the nascent world of Web-based email. Originally launched in 1996 by Jack Smith and Sabeer Bhatia as ‘HoTMaiL’ (referencing HTML, the language of the World Wide Web), Hotmail was initially folded into Microsoft’s MSN online service. Mistakes were made. Many dollars were spent. Branding was changed. Spam became legion. Many, many horrendous email signatures were spawned.”

The Next Web: Mozilla’s Thunderbird email client isn’t dead yet

The Next Web: Mozilla’s Thunderbird email client isn’t dead yet . “Fans of Mozilla’s Thunderbird desktop email client will be happy to know that the nonprofit hasn’t yet killed the app off. Instead, it’s giving it a new lease of life. The organization noted that Thunderbird’s stable release, version 52, recently got a bunch of fixes and improvements. It also added four new staff members dedicated to the project over the past year, and recently launched pushed the second beta of version 58, which has a revamped visual design, better error handling, importing from Outlook, and improved performance. The bigger change that’s coming is the end of support for legacy add-ons.”

San Diego: Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach

UC San Diego: Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach. “The concept behind the tool, called Tripwire, is relatively simple. DeBlasio created a bot that registers and creates accounts on a large number of websites—around 2,300 were included in their study. Each account is associated with a unique email address. The tool was designed to use the same password for the email account and the website account associated with that email. Researchers then waited to see if an outside party used the password to access the email account. This would indicate that the website’s account information had been leaked.” The researchers are not planning to go further with Tripwire. I hope someone else picks this up.