Between You, Me, and Google: Problems With Gmail’s “Confidential Mode” (EFF)

EFF: Between You, Me, and Google: Problems With Gmail’s “Confidential Mode”. “With Gmail’s new design rolled out to more and more users, many have had a chance to try out its new ‘Confidential Mode.’ While many of its features sound promising, what ‘Confidential Mode’ provides isn’t confidentiality. At best, the new mode might create expectations that it fails to meet around security and privacy in Gmail. We fear that Confidential Mode will make it less likely for users to find and use other, more secure communication alternatives. And at worst, Confidential Mode will push users further into Google’s own walled garden while giving them what we believe are misleading assurances of privacy and security.”

The Quint: Google in Snooze Mode as Third Parties Caught Pilfering User Data

The Quint: Google in Snooze Mode as Third Parties Caught Pilfering User Data. “According to a Wall Street Journal Report, some third-party app developers had gained access to users’ data on Gmail and were able to read whatever data was available online! Google recently came out with a rebuttal saying that it was only vetting third-party apps and not reading the data. Many might believe what Google is saying, but the rabbit hole goes deeper. Here’s a closer look at this whole mess that Google has got itself in.” I have mentioned this issue before, but this article is an excellent overview/explainer. Beware of LOUD AUTOPLAY VIDEO. Sheesh.

Digital Inspiration: How Attachment Reminders work inside Gmail?

From Amit Agarwal, in case you were wondering: How Attachment Reminders work inside Gmail?. “If you haven’t seen this earlier, compose a new email in Gmail, add ‘I’ve attached the file’ in the body and hit send. Gmail will pop-up a warning saying – ‘it seems like you forgot to attach the file.’ How does the forgotten attachment detector work inside Gmail? I was looking at the source code of Gmail.com using Chrome Dev Tools and found an interesting snippet that bares it all.”

Forbes: Google Has Been Letting App Developers Gain Access To Users’ Gmails, Unsurprisingly

Forbes: Google Has Been Letting App Developers Gain Access To Users’ Gmails, Unsurprisingly. “Google has reportedly allowed third-party developers of Android apps to review millions of Gmail messages, which seems about right. On Monday, a report by The Wall Street Journal drew attention to the fact that access settings for Gmail, Google’s popular email platform, allow users to opt-in to sharing data with developers, which can include users’ personal content and details.”

How-To Geek: The 8 Best Features in the New Gmail

How-To Geek: The 8 Best Features in the New Gmail. “Google is changing how Gmail looks and works. They launched the new Gmail back in April, but until now it’s been optional. That changes in July, when the new Gmail starts rolling out to all users. Everyone will be switched over 12 weeks after the transition starts. If you’re seeing the new Gmail for the first time you might be a little overwhelmed. To help you feel a little more at home, here’s a quick roundup of the new features and how to use them.” Nice overview.

Engadget: The EFF wants to make email servers more secure

Engadget: The EFF wants to make email servers more secure. “The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) launched HTTPS-encryption initiative Let’s Encrypt two years ago with Mozilla and Cisco. Now it’s turning its attention to email servers with a new project called STARTTLS Everywhere, which aims to help server admins run STARTTLS emails servers properly. Because according to the EFF, most aren’t.”

Oregon email restored; official says hack fed scheme (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Oregon email restored; official says hack fed scheme . “After a multi-day freeze triggered by a wave of spam messages, officials confirmed late Thursday that Oregon government emails could once again reach the public—and described the attack as part of a sophisticated scheme. The freeze, initiated by providers at four popular email servers including Hotmail and Outlook, had blocked all messages from official Oregon.Gov email addresses from being delivered. But the attack that led to the state’s email service being temporarily blacklisted likely wasn’t targeting government data.”