Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19 (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19. “A number of countries went into politically decreed late hibernation at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Many of those affected by the lockdown suffered negative economic and social consequences. Geodesy, a branch of Earth science to study Earth’s gravity field and its shape, on the other hand, has benefited from the drastic reduction in human activity. At least that is what the study now published in Geophysical Research Letters shows. The study, which was carried out by geodesists from the University of Bonn, investigated the location of a precise GNSS antenna in Boston (Massachusetts) as an example.”

CNN: This map lets you see where your hometown was on the Earth millions of years ago

CNN: This map lets you see where your hometown was on the Earth millions of years ago. “A California paleontologist has created an interactive map that allows people to see how far their hometowns have moved over 750 million years of continental drift. The online map, designed by Ian Webster, features a range of tools that also make it easy to discover more about the Earth, such as where the first reptiles lived or when the first flower bloomed.”

Arizona State University: Create your own planetary adventure with ASU’s new 3D terrain app

Arizona State University: Create your own planetary adventure with ASU’s new 3D terrain app. “… the Mars Space Flight Facility teamed up recently with Assistant Professor Robert LiKamWa and graduate student Lauren Gold of the Meteor Studio in ASU’s School of Arts Media and Engineering to launch a new smartphone app called JMARS AR Viewer. In developing the app, they were assisted by ASU undergraduates Hannah Bartolomea and Shaun Xiong, and Hamilton High School student Alexander Gonzalez. Downloadable for free from the Apple and Android stores, the JMARS AR Viewer allows users to virtually project planetary terrains from Mars, Mercury, Earth and the moon onto their physical environment.”

NASA: NASA Fosters Innovative Ways to Understand Biodiversity

NASA: NASA Fosters Innovative Ways to Understand Biodiversity. “To study and monitor changes in Earth’s biodiversity, or the immense volume of organisms in the world, scientists and citizen scientists record their sightings in the field. At the same time, sensors on the ground and on board satellites and aircraft monitor flora and fauna on a regional to global scale. NASA has funded four projects to create new, virtual portals that bring into focus this wealth of biodiversity information to help inform scientists, land managers and decision makers around the world regarding the status and health of terrestrial ecosystems.”

Penn State News: Libraries virtual exhibition highlights human impact on our planet

Penn State News: Libraries virtual exhibition highlights human impact on our planet. “The virtual exhibition invites the viewer to consider a range of environmental-related topics and will serve as a growing, centralized resource for the Libraries’ rich trove of primary sources focused around key issues and themes: Climate Change and Weather Data, Energy and Extraction History, Environmental Disasters and Pollution, Arctic Exploration, Eco-Materiality and Future Speculations, Biodiversity, and Environmental Protection and Activism.”

Space: You can build your own Earth 2.0 with the awesome website ‘Earth-like’

Space: You can build your own Earth 2.0 with the awesome website ‘Earth-like’. “You can now build your very own Earth 2.0! A new website allows users to create an Earth-like planet with a wide selection of options in an effort to demonstrate how many of the new exoplanets lauded as ‘Earth-like’ may not resemble our planet at all. The researchers behind this website hope to clear up some of the confusion about what the phrase ‘Earth-like’ really means.”

Tufts Now: Teaching Kids About Nature to Save the Planet

Tufts Now: Teaching Kids About Nature to Save the Planet. “The class explores programs and methods that connect children and teens to the natural world in ways that support their development as stewards of the Earth—from forest schools, wilderness programs,environmental education, and urban gardening programs to reading programs using nature-friendly children’s books and teen protests that have captured the attention of the world. The class has also proved a catalyst for a new online venture to share that information with the wider world. Tomorrow’s Earth Stewards, an online publication, includes articles on programs and methods being used around the world to support children’s and youth’s development as earth stewards.”

McGill Newsroom: World’s most detailed database maps characteristics of Earth’s rivers and catchments

McGill Newsroom: World’s most detailed database maps characteristics of Earth’s rivers and catchments. “Two researchers and friends from opposite ends of the Earth have created a world-first high spatial resolution atlas that maps the environmental characteristics of all the globe’s rivers and catchments. HydroATLAS was co-developed by Bernhard Lehner and his team from McGill University’s Department of Geography and Simon Linke from Griffith University’s Australian Rivers Institute.”

The Manual of Digital Earth: An open access publication to advance the creation of a Digital Earth (Group on Earth Observations)

Group on Earth Observations (GEO): The Manual of Digital Earth: An open access publication to advance the creation of a Digital Earth. “‘Digital Earth’ is a global initiative to create a comprehensive virtual representation of our planet. As digital technologies advance, this vision is quickly becoming a reality. The International Society for Digital Earth (ISDE) has just published a new open source book to help advance the creation of Digital Earth.”

Phys .org: Recreating Earth through code

Phys .org: Recreating Earth through code. “The first Earth System Model developed and based in Africa are creating one of the most reliable and most detailed modulations of climate change. What does it take to recreate Earth? A couple of thousands of line of code, throw in some data from all the weather stations around the world, and a supercomputer.”

‘Ultimate gift to future generations’: plan to laser map all land on Earth (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Ultimate gift to future generations’: plan to laser map all land on Earth. “A project to produce detailed maps of all the land on Earth through laser scanning has been revealed by researchers who say action is needed now to preserve a record of the world’s cultural, environmental and geological treasures.”

Science Magazine: Earth scientists plan to meld massive databases into a ‘geological Google’

Science Magazine: Earth scientists plan to meld massive databases into a ‘geological Google’. “The British Geological Survey (BGS) has amassed one of the world’s premier collections of geologic samples. Housed in three enormous warehouses in Nottingham, U.K., it contains about 3 million fossils gathered over more than 150 years at thousands of sites across the country. But this data trove ‘was not really very useful to anybody,’ says Michael Stephenson, a BGS paleontologist. Notes about the samples and their associated rocks ‘were sitting in boxes on bits of paper.’ Now, that could change, thanks to a nascent international effort to meld earth science databases into what Stephenson and other backers are describing as a ‘geological Google.'”

Carnegie Mellon University: Savvy Use of Data, Technology Tells the Planet’s Story

Carnegie Mellon University: Savvy Use of Data, Technology Tells the Planet’s Story. “The story of EarthTime begins on Mars. EarthTime today is a technological platform that helps people comprehend massive amounts of data about our planet and come to grips with our biggest global challenges. But 15 years ago, people just wanted to see what the Red Planet looked like.”

Artnet: Satellites Are Taking Data-Based Images of the Earth and the Colors Are Spectacular—See Them Here

Artnet: Satellites Are Taking Data-Based Images of the Earth and the Colors Are Spectacular—See Them Here. “Experience Earth art as you’ve never seen it before in a stunning new set of satellite images that depicts the globe’s landscape in otherworldly hues. Last month, the United States Geological Survey released the fifth installment of the ‘Earth as Art’ series drawn from imagery taken by the Landsat satellite program.”