University of California: With a nod to UC Berkeley, Google crowdsources earthquake data

University of California: With a nod to UC Berkeley, Google crowdsources earthquake data. “A UC Berkeley idea to crowdsource every cellphone on the planet to create a global seismic network has been adapted by Google and incorporated into the Android operating system, kicking off an effort to build the world’s largest network of earthquake detectors.”

Phys .org: Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors

Phys .org: Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors. “Tens of thousands of seismic stations around the world continuously record local seismic activity, with an output that is far beyond what scientists can process. Here, researchers from Northwestern University have called over 2,000 citizen scientists to the rescue for the crowd-based analysis of seismic recordings, rendered into audiovisual format, through the program Earthquake Detective on the Open-Science platform Zooniverse. They show that citizens are at least as accurate as machine learning, and can even identify tectonic tremors, which previously was only possible for trained professionals.”

Scoop New Zealand: Canterbury Earthquake Resources Find A Permanent Home

Scoop New Zealand: Canterbury Earthquake Resources Find A Permanent Home. “Lessons learned from the Canterbury earthquakes will be shared widely and preserved for the future when a collection of reports and information moves to a new digital home. The Government’s Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Learning and Legacy Programme – which collected over 200 online items – is being transferred to the University of Canterbury’s CEISMIC – Canterbury Earthquakes Digital Archive.”

OPB: Portland Takes Database Of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings Offline

OPB: Portland Takes Database Of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings Offline. “Want to find out if you live in a Portland building particularly vulnerable in an earthquake? You won’t be able to do it online any longer. Portland has quietly agreed to take down its online database detailing the approximately 1,600 old brick and stone buildings in the city considered likely to collapse in the next major earthquake.”

University of Alaska Fairbanks: Online tool allows fast, free natural-hazard visualization

University of Alaska Fairbanks: Online tool allows fast, free natural-hazard visualization. “This spring, a team of scientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Alaska Satellite Facility released SARVIEWS 2.0, a free online service to monitor data from earthquakes and volcanoes. SARVIEWS and its update, SARVIEWS 2.0, are automated tools that allow scientists, the public and emergency management professionals to monitor and analyze natural hazards in near real time. The tool creates products from images of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 radar remote sensing satellites and makes them available through a dedicated interface. From the time of data collection, it typically takes SARVIEWS only a few hours to make maps or other visualizations available.”

International Institute for Environment and Development: IIED publishes archive on post-quake planning in Haiti

International Institute for Environment and Development: IIED publishes archive on post-quake planning in Haiti . “IIED is marking the ten-year anniversary of the Haiti earthquake by publishing an online archive documenting post-disaster community planning work in the city of Port-au-Prince. IIED will also launch a working paper summarising the experience gained in Haiti and host a discussion meeting later this month.”

TechCrunch: Scientists turn undersea fiber optic cables into seismographs

TechCrunch: Scientists turn undersea fiber optic cables into seismographs. “Monitoring seismic activity all over the world is an important task, but one that requires equipment to be at the site it’s measuring — difficult in the middle of the ocean. But new research from Berkeley could turn existing undersea fiber optic cables into a network of seismographs, creating an unprecedented global view of the Earth’s tectonic movements.”

Los Angeles Times: Thousands of L.A. apartments aren’t ready for the next earthquake. Is yours?

Los Angeles Times: Thousands of L.A. apartments aren’t ready for the next earthquake. Is yours?. “In 2016, Los Angeles launched a program to find and fix ‘soft-story’ apartment buildings — those perched above parking spaces with little support and at risk of collapse in a major earthquake. The city identified about 11,400 apartment buildings in need of retrofitting. So far, only a quarter have done the work. ”

Phys .org: California earthquake alerts to become available statewide

Phys .org: California earthquake alerts to become available statewide. “Warnings produced by the ShakeAlert system will be pushed through two delivery systems: a cellphone app called MyShake and the same wireless notification system that issues Amber Alerts, meaning people may receive both notifications…. The state earthquake app, developed at the University of California, Berkeley, is available for download to IOS users through iTunes and through GooglePlay stores for Android phones.”

Xinhua: Chinese restoration specialists help Nepal recover soul of Kathmandu Valley culture

Xinhua: Chinese restoration specialists help Nepal recover soul of Kathmandu Valley culture. “Forming thousands of jigsaw pieces into a picture might be a headache for many, but what Chinese restorer Zhou Jianguo and his team face in Nepal is far more challenging — numerous pieces of debris from a world cultural heritage site that was damaged in a 7.9-magnitude earthquake. The devastating earthquake jolted Kathmandu Valley in 2015, the heart of Nepal’s world cultural heritage sites, causing great damage to the historical building complexes, including the finest temples and towers in the renowned Kathmandu Durbar Square.”

Newswise: Machine-learning competition boosts earthquake prediction capabilities

Newswise: Machine-learning competition boosts earthquake prediction capabilities. “Three teams who applied novel machine learning methods to successfully predict the timing of earthquakes from historic seismic data are splitting $50,000 in prize money from an open, online Kaggle competition hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and its partners.”

MIT Technology Review: Crowdsourced reports could save lives when the next earthquake hits

MIT Technology Review: Crowdsourced reports could save lives when the next earthquake hits. “In Japan and California, huge networks of sensors and seismic stations can alert citizens to an earthquake. But these networks are expensive to install and maintain. Earthquake-prone countries such as Mexico and Indonesia don’t have such an advanced or widespread system. A cheap, effective way to help close this gap between countries might be to crowdsource earthquake reports and combine them with traditional detection data from seismic monitoring stations. The approach was described in a paper in Science Advances today.”

Catalyst NZ: Christchurch Memories Preserved with New Red Zone App

Catalyst NZ: Christchurch Memories Preserved with New Red Zone App. “Catalyst – South Island, is proud to have partnered with the University of Canterbury Arts Digital Lab to develop the ‘Red Zone Stories’ application. This application will crowdsource and preserve the memories of the neighbourhood that were lost after the February 2011 quake.”

Washington: Database shows buildings that could pose safety risk during earthquakes

Washington: Database shows buildings that could pose safety risk during earthquakes. “A new interactive database launched in March takes us one step closer to knowing how safe our buildings are during an earthquake. The database — while not comprehensive — presents a list and map of potentially unreinforced masonry buildings, or URMs, throughout the state.”