The Future of History: How New Tools Tap Into Diverse Perspectives on the Past (North Carolina State University)

North Carolina State University: The Future of History: How New Tools Tap Into Diverse Perspectives on the Past. “Bodies and Structures 2.0, which I [David Ambaras] co-direct with Kate McDonald, is a way to do multivocal spatial histories of modern East Asia and the worlds of which it has been a part. It consists of 17 individually authored modules, which examine a diverse range of topics, such as histories of disease and vaccination; narcotics trafficking; colonialism; migration; and urban life. These modules feature cutting-edge research on Japan (including Okinawa), Taiwan, China, Vietnam and Mongolia. On top of this, the site uses tags, annotations, links, and visualizations to connect and cut across the modules, giving contributors and users the opportunity to think comparatively about space, place and power.”

Newswise: AI Tool Promises Better Automated Analysis of Datasets with Rare Items, a Key Real-World Limitation

Newswise: AI Tool Promises Better Automated Analysis of Datasets with Rare Items, a Key Real-World Limitation. “The MiikeMineStamps dataset of stamps provides a unique window into the workings of a large Japanese corporation, opening unprecedented possibilities for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. But some of the stamps in this archive only appear in a small number of instances. This makes for a ‘long tail’ distribution that poses particular challenges for AI learning, including fields in which AI has experienced serious failures.”

Claremont McKenna College: CMC awarded major grant for open-access book series

Claremont McKenna College: CMC awarded major grant for open-access book series. “The Henry Luce Foundation has awarded Claremont McKenna College, under the direction of Prof. Albert L. Park, a $240,000 grant to launch an open-access book series on The Environments of East Asia with Cornell University Press. This is the first book series that integrates scholarship on East Asia with environmental studies ever published with an academic press.”

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”