Fortune: How to Livestream the Super Blue Blood Moon on Wednesday

Fortune: How to Livestream the Super Blue Blood Moon on Wednesday. “The Super Blue Blood Moon eclipse is set to happen on January 31st. According to Space.com, the eclipse should be visible in-person by people in California, western Canada, Hawaii, Alaska, Australia, and eastern Asia, weather permitting. However, if you live somewhere else, catching the eclipse in action might be a bit more challenging.”

CNET: Google’s solar ‘Eclipse Megamovie’ is ready for viewing

CNET: Google’s solar ‘Eclipse Megamovie’ is ready for viewing. “Before the total solar eclipse crossed the US on Aug. 21, Google asked amateur scientists from all over the country to submit photographs they took of the sun and its atmosphere during the eclipse. The tech giant assembled more than 34,000 images submitted of the rare event into a nearly 3-minute movie it released Monday called the ‘Eclipse Magamovie.’” I think “Magamovie” is a typo.

Smithsonian: What Should You Do With Your Used Eclipse Glasses?

Smithsonian Magazine: What Should You Do With Your Used Eclipse Glasses?. “Perhaps the most useful thing you can do with your glasses is to donate them to Astronomers Without Borders. The organization will soon announce a program to collect the used glasses and distribute them to schools in South America and parts of Asia, which will experience their own solar eclipses in 2019. While the organization will not collect the glasses themselves, they are partnering with corporate sponsors who will set up drop-off sites for the used eyewear. (We will update this article when details about drop off sites emerge.)”

UCAR: Eclipse Science, Then And Now

New-to-me, from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR): Eclipse Science, Then And Now . “Scientists are eager to capture images of this year’s eclipse — but that’s nothing new. Researchers have been poring over images of total solar eclipses practically since there were images available to pore over. Thanks to the NCAR High Altitude Observatory (HAO), while you wait for Monday’s Great American Eclipse of 2017, you can gaze at those same images, too. The solar scientists at HAO host an online gallery with 140 years of eclipse photos, starting in 1869.”

Bravo: Want an Easy—and Delicious—Way to Safely View the Solar Eclipse? Use a Pizza Box!

Bravo: Want an Easy—and Delicious—Way to Safely View the Solar Eclipse? Use a Pizza Box!. “Everybody’s finding a way to jump on the total eclipse bandwagon—from national parks setting up viewing points to distilleries rolling out special vodka bottles to cruise lines offering themed voyages (where, unbelievably, you’ll find Joe Jonas on board crooning “Total Eclipse of the Heart”). With the first total solar eclipse to hit the continental U.S. since 1979 coming up on August 21, the latest entity to come up a total eclipse marketing tactic is none other than Pizza Hut.”

Quartz: How to watch the Great American Eclipse live, no matter where you are in the world

Quartz: How to watch the Great American Eclipse live, no matter where you are in the world. “Anyone living in the continental US will be able to see the partial eclipse at some point during the day on Aug. 21. If you don’t live in the path of totality (the 70 mile-wide area where the total eclipse will be visible) or live outside the US, you can still get a great view from dozens of live streams. Don’t worry, it’s completely safe to watch video feeds of the eclipse.”

Poynter: Not sure when the next eclipse is? The New York Times built a calendar for that

Poynter: Not sure when the next eclipse is? The New York Times built a calendar for that. “On Friday, the newspaper soft-launched a new digital calendar that includes future space events such as eclipses, comets and meteor showers. The feature syncs with readers’ personal calendars and includes requisite information like dates and times, as well as links to livestreams and background stories — all with the goal of serving as a personal digital guide for astronomy.”

Berkeley: Megamovie app makes photographing total eclipse a snap

Berkeley: Megamovie app makes photographing total eclipse a snap. “When downloaded and installed, the app walks users through a simple process to point your smart phone at the sun using an appropriate filter to protect the camera’s sensors. Once protected and pointed properly, the camera determines where you are and automatically starts taking photos of the sun 15 seconds before totality at your location, snaps periodic shots throughout the total eclipse – which will last a maximum of 2 minutes, 40 seconds, depending on where you are – and takes a series of photos during the 15 seconds after the total eclipse has ended to capture the ‘diamond ring’ effect.”

USA Today: How to photograph time-lapses of Total Eclipse

USA Today: How to photograph time-lapses of Total Eclipse. “For most of us, getting photos of the sun with our tiny smartphones just won’t cut it. But you know what will? A cool time-lapse of the scene, as we watch the sun slip briefly behind the moon, and day becomes night and then day again. How to get a great time-lapse shot? You’ve come to the right spot. Especially if you’re interested in doing it on a smartphone or with the tiny GoPro camera. “

The Verge: Don’t blindly trust companies selling solar eclipse glasses on Amazon

A bit outside my remit, but eyesight, it’s important: Don’t blindly trust companies selling solar eclipse glasses on Amazon. “A quick search of solar filter glasses on Amazon will pull up hundreds of companies selling products for safely viewing the eclipse. Many of the glasses are sponsored or recommended by Amazon, and claim to have been certified for safely viewing the Sun. However, some of the vendors being featured on Amazon’s website are allegedly selling counterfeit products, and it’s hard to tell which ones are legitimate.”

Larry Ferlazzo Aggregating August 21 Eclipse Resources

From the most excellent Larry Ferlazzo: The Best Resources For Learning About The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse. “You’ve probably already heard about the upcoming Total Solar Eclipse that will take place on August 21st and be viewable in the United States. I thought it would be useful to collect a few related resources.” Not a ton here yet, but Larry being Larry I suspect it’ll get a lot of updates.