Phys .org: High time to open up ecological research

Phys .org: High time to open up ecological research. “Share the code and data behind the research please. It’s easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ecologists found that currently, only about a quarter of the scientific papers in their field publicly shares computer code for analyses. ‘To make the science of ecology more transparent and reproducible, sharing is urgently needed.'”

UC Santa Barbara: Take It or Leave It

UC Santa Barbara: Take It or Leave It. “Of California’s 23 federal offshore platforms, many are nearing the end of their lives, and regulators need to decide what to do with the underwater superstructures. Some advocate removing the platforms in their entirety, while others propose leaving their support structures in place to continue acting as human-made reefs. In an effort to inform this discussion, a group of researchers led by scientists at UC Santa Barbara has produced 11 studies in a dedicated issue of the Bulletin of Marine Science outlining the ecology of the state’s oil platforms. They’ve also compiled a searchable database of studies on platform ecology carried out worldwide.”

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Quantifying the contribution of citizen science to broad‐scale ecological databases

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Quantifying the contribution of citizen science to broad‐scale ecological databases. “Ecological research increasingly relies on broad‐scale databases containing information collected by personnel from a variety of sources, including government agencies, universities, and citizen‐science programs. However, the contribution of citizen‐science programs to these databases is not well known. We analyzed one such database to quantify the contribution of citizen science to lake water‐quality data from seven US states.”

Natural History of Ecological Restoration: Desert Trees of the World – A new database for ecological restoration

Natural History of Ecological Restoration: Desert Trees of the World – A new database for ecological restoration. “Desert Trees of the World represents a multi-purpose, participatory database in which we have gathered a vast array of information about dryland trees, where and how they live, the communities they are part of, the many ways in which they are used by people, and some elements about their successful cultivation.”

NewsWise: Researchers win $3 million NSF grant to train teams of data detectives with ecological expertise

NewsWise: Researchers win $3 million NSF grant to train teams of data detectives with ecological expertise. “When it comes to how climate change is impacting ecosystems, there’s no shortage of data out there. But finding enough people who know both ecology and how to interpret that data can be a different story. A team at Northern Arizona University is wagering that more skilled interpreters can help make sense of this data deluge, and their idea just won a five-year, nearly $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to train graduate students in tackling big ecological questions through informatics, collaboration and better communication.”

EurekAlert: Scientists take to Twitter to study flying ants, starling murmurations and house spiders

EurekAlert: Scientists take to Twitter to study flying ants, starling murmurations and house spiders . “Searching tweets for text or hashtags allowed researchers to gather information on popular ecological phenomena observed in the UK such as the emergence of flying ants and starling murmurations. Their findings are published today in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.”

EurekAlert: Ecology and AI

EurekAlert: Ecology and AI . “It’s poised to transform fields from earthquake prediction to cancer detection to self-driving cars, and now scientists are unleashing the power of deep learning on a new field – ecology. A team of researchers from Harvard, Auburn University, the University of Wyoming, the University of Oxford and the University of Minnesota demonstrated that the artificial intelligence technique can be used to identify animal images captured by motion-sensing cameras.”

University of Queensland: Social network models provide new tool for ecology studies

University of Queensland: Social network models provide new tool for ecology studies. “Social media networks such as Twitter and Facebook have inspired a new method of describing how other species interact with one another. University of Queensland School of Veterinary Science researcher Dr Nicholas Clark said the models used to show people’s social interactions offered an exciting way to address a gap in scientific knowledge.”

EurekAlert: How social media helps scientists get the message across

EurekAlert: How social media helps scientists get the message across . “Analyzing the famous academic aphorism ‘publish or perish’ through a modern digital lens, a group of emerging ecologists and conservation scientists wanted to see whether communicating their new research discoveries through social media–primarily Twitter–eventually leads to higher citations years down the road. Turns out, the tweets are worth the time investment.”

UC Santa Barbara: Where’s the Bear?

UC Santa Barbara: Where’s the Bear?. “Consider Sedgwick Ranch Reserve, part of UC Santa Barbara’s Natural Reserve System. A sprawling and pristine 6,000 acres and nine square miles, the protected land used for research and teaching is a veritable nirvana for animals of all kinds. Mountain lions and black bears and deer, oh my. And they are all represented many times over in the reserve’s massive image archive — millions of pictures of thousands of animals, captured by multiple camera traps and dating back more than a decade. But who has time to sort them all? Cue the computer scientists.”

new resource: national sustainable agriculture oral history archive (TIFOB)

New-to-me, from The Irresistible Fleet of Bicycles (really): new resource: national sustainable agriculture oral history archive. “The National Sustainable Agriculture Oral History Archive is a collection of interviews with people who have been instrumental in the development and implementation of public policies to advance sustainable agriculture in the United States. It was started in 2015 and has been growing ever since. Several of the interviews are with key members of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) and their interviews document the process of formation and evolution that has led to the NSAC that we know today. “

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web . “For fields like environmental science, collecting data is hard. Gathering results on a single project can mean months of painstaking measurements, observations and notes, likely in limited conditions, hopefully to be published in a highly specialized journal with a target audience made up mostly of just other specialists in the field. That’s why when, this past summer, Duke students Devri Adams, Camila Restrepo and Annie Lott set out with Professor Emily Bernhardt to combine over six decades of data on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest into a workable, aesthetically pleasing visualization website, they were really breaking new ground in the way the public can appreciate this truly massive store of information.”

Phys.org: Ninety-eight scientists launch a 2,000-year global temperature database

Phys.org: Ninety-eight scientists launch a 2,000-year global temperature database. “The culmination of three years of painstaking collaborative work, the PAGES2k 2,000 Year Multiproxy Database contains 692 records from 648 locations across the globe, including new additions from all continents and ocean basins. The records include trees, corals, glacier ice, lake and marine sediments, as well as documentary evidence. Together, they form the largest body of climate records with the highest temporal resolution available, ranging from the biweekly to the bicentennial.”