Business Insider: Facebook says it will ban sales of the Amazon rainforest after an investigation found plots of land were illegally sold on the platform

Business Insider: Facebook says it will ban sales of the Amazon rainforest after an investigation found plots of land were illegally sold on the platform. “In February, the BBC investigation “Our World: Selling the Amazon” uncovered that people were illegally selling plots of Brazil’s Amazon rainforest on Facebook Marketplace. Now, Facebook is ‘announcing measures to curb attempts to sell land in ecological conservation areas within the Amazon rainforest on Facebook Marketplace,’ the company said in a blog post on Friday.”

The Conversation: Old, goopy museum specimens can tell fascinating stories of wildlife history. Finally, we can read them

The Conversation: Old, goopy museum specimens can tell fascinating stories of wildlife history. Finally, we can read them. “In response to the extinction crisis, the call is out to scour Australia’s collections for data to fill knowledge gaps. For many species, however, recovering historical genetic data has been severely impeded, not by a lack of specimens but by the methods used to preserve them. This is where my new research comes in. Our paper shows how natural history collections around the world can squeeze every last drop of historical genetic data out of their specimens, from dried iridescent wings of butterflies to platypus bills floating in alcohol.”

Cornell Chronicle: eBird data can help track bee health

Cornell Chronicle: eBird data can help track bee health. “A two-year, $500,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation will allow a team of data scientists and ecologists to use eBird data to explore a new way to track pollinator health and biodiversity. The project allows the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability to devise a new method of tracking the health of the all-important arthropod populations that are a part of pollinating one out of every three bites of food people eat – and it all starts with birds.”

The Star (Malaysia): Singapore using ‘virtual twins’ of land and sea to monitor activities and plan projects

The Star (Malaysia): Singapore using ‘virtual twins’ of land and sea to monitor activities and plan projects. “GeoSpace-Sea stores and presents data from 11 government agencies, including national water agency PUB and the Housing Board. For example, if the National Parks Board (NParks) wants to study marine biodiversity, it can use the virtual twin to access marine life data, or the distribution of corals and sea grass. GeoSpace-Sea allows users to view and analyse the seabed with three-dimensional images as well.”

Firstpost: Online exhibition archives oral histories of the Kolis, degradation of Mumbai’s coastal ecology

Firstpost: Online exhibition archives oral histories of the Kolis, degradation of Mumbai’s coastal ecology. “Through generations, the Kolis have observed firsthand how the ecology has been disturbed, and given how closely intertwined their lives are with nature, have had to adapt to these changes. All this is evident in their photos, displayed at the online exhibition Through the Eyes of the Kolis: A Reflection of Mumbai’s Past, Present, and Future, created by the experimental think tank Bombay61 Studio, with The Heritage Lab and Ministry of Mumbai’s Magic (MMM).”

Art and the watershed: Learning about what’s here and how to preserve it (Cowichan Valley Citizen)

Cowichan Valley Citizen: Art and the watershed: Learning about what’s here and how to preserve it. “Soon after the pandemic upended daily lives for many people last year, Genevieve Singleton started posting a message on Facebook every day. Not the usual family updates or look-at-what-I-ate-for-dinner photos you might expect see on social media. Instead, she uses her page to draw attention to the natural world in the Cowichan Valley.”

The City Paper: Colombia home to 20% of world’s butterfly species, reveals report

The City Paper: Colombia home to 20% of world’s butterfly species, reveals report. “The yellow butterflies that swarm the imaginary and magical landscapes of Nobel Laureate Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude are just one species of 3,642 that inhabit the very real Colombia, and country home to 20% of all butterfly species on the planet. The findings are the result of years of research by scientists, collectors, students and amateurs documenting species across topographically challenging terrain. The list of 3,642 species and 2,085 subspecies was compiled by Dr Blanca Huertas, Senior Curator at the Natural History Museum in London.”

From the ashes: historical botanic photos destroyed in Cape Town fire resurrected (The Guardian)

The Guardian: From the ashes: historical botanic photos destroyed in Cape Town fire resurrected. “Luckily, after joining the university in 2000, [Professor Timm] Hoffman invested in the digitisation of the photographic archive. Although he is yet to muster the courage to go through the digital databases – ‘I’m still grieving,’ he says – he estimates that 30,000 images have been digitised and that he has at least one image for 90% of his most important sites. But only 10% of another collection of 35,000 slides had been digitised. ‘If we’d invested in bigger, faster scanners we could have finished by now,’ he laments. ‘But I’m also very proud that we digitised at all. Not many ecologists are focused on digital archives. No one else has a collection like this in Africa.’”

Vegetation of planet Earth: Researchers publish unique database as Open Access (Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg)

Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg: Vegetation of planet Earth: Researchers publish unique database as Open Access. “It’s a treasure trove of data: the global geodatabase of vegetation plots ‘sPlotOpen’ is now freely accessible. It contains data on vegetation from 114 countries and from all climate zones on Earth. The database was compiled by an international team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS).”

SNAPSHOT USA: First-ever nationwide mammal survey published (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: SNAPSHOT USA: First-ever nationwide mammal survey published. “How are the squirrels doing this year? The bears? The armadillos? How would you know? A new paper published June 8 sets up the framework for answering these questions across the United States by releasing the data from the first national mammal survey made up of 1,509 motion-activated camera traps from 110 sites located across all 50 states.”

USGS: USGS Releases Nationwide Marsh Vulnerability Maps

USGS: USGS Releases Nationwide Marsh Vulnerability Maps. “U.S. Geological Survey scientists have developed and made available a new mapping resource that can identify the most vulnerable marshes across the contiguous U.S. through a combination of remote-sensing and satellite technologies. These maps provide critical information to land managers and help inform marsh conservation and restoration strategies without costly site-specific or labor-intensive assessments.”