New Yorker: Why I Quit Elon Musk’s Twitter

New Yorker: Why I Quit Elon Musk’s Twitter. “It seems likely that this experiment will conclude with bankruptcy and Twitter falling into the hands of creditors who will have their own ideas of what it should be and whom it should serve. But at least in the interim it’s worth keeping in mind that some battles are simply not worth fighting, some battles must be fought, but none are worth fighting on terms set by those who win by having the conflict drag on endlessly.”

CogDogBlog: Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Go Back into the Google Image CC Search Waters Again…

CogDogBlog: Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Go Back into the Google Image CC Search Waters Again… . “I am not looking for any kind of fix here. And I don’t want to keep documenting this stuff. But it is obvious to me that we should not sent people to use Google Image search for Creative Licensed photos without making them aware that the results are not to be trusted.”

Financial Times: Let crypto burn

Financial Times: Let crypto burn. “In the aftermath of the collapse of FTX, authorities should resist the urge to create a parallel legal and regulatory framework for the crypto industry. It is far better to do nothing, and just let crypto burn. Actively intervening would convey undeserved legitimacy upon a system that does little to support real economic activity. It also would provide an official seal of approval to a system that currently poses no threat to financial stability and would lead to calls for public bailouts when crypto inevitably erupts again.”

New York Times: Twitter Was Influential in the Pandemic. Are We Better for It?

New York Times: Twitter Was Influential in the Pandemic. Are We Better for It?. “When I wanted immediate feedback on an epidemiological model at 2 a.m., colleagues in Australia were awake and online to help. Twitter helped me to reach hundreds of thousands of concerned people, online and via news media, and help them understand what was happening. My Twitter following exploded from just over 10,000 to over 100,000 followers in six months. Many of my colleagues could tell a ‌‌similar story. And they could tell another as well.”

EDITORIAL: Why Africa should worry about new Twitter policies (Garowe Online)

Garowe Online: EDITORIAL: Why Africa should worry about new Twitter policies. “In Somalia, where information sharing has been traditionally oral, Twitter offered government officials the to narrate events, receive flak or praise from citizens, and debate on issues around security, culture, and economy…. Nothing could hurt Africa more than a dilution of a platform people have come to see as credible, available, and free and which has challenged authorities in most autocracies to conform or at least pretend to.”

The Hill: The true tragedy behind Musk’s Twitter buyout is the power of billionaires

The Hill: The true tragedy behind Musk’s Twitter buyout is the power of billionaires. “The fact that one single person, Elon Musk, could access enough money to buy out an entire social media platform is incredible. It would take the median American worker, working full time at $55,640 a year, no fewer than 790,797 years to make the $44 billion needed to buy Twitter. This is longer than human beings have been on the planet.”

CNET: Elon Musk’s Twitter Meltdown Is a Train Wreck We Can’t Look Away From

CNET: Elon Musk’s Twitter Meltdown Is a Train Wreck We Can’t Look Away From. “We’re potentially seeing the rapid implosion of one of the most influential social media platforms in the world, one that helped kick off revolutions (for the better) and shifted the fate of presidential elections (for the worse). Though bygone platforms like Friendster or Google Plus faded away quietly, Twitter, in typical Musk style, could be going out with the roar of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launch.

The New Republic: Well, Twitter Looks Doomed!

The New Republic: Well, Twitter Looks Doomed!. “In sum, Musk is facing a real and precipitous loss in the already insufficient advertising dollars which accounted for most of Twitter’s revenue throughout its history. He is throwing his weight behind a hastily designed subscription service that currently provides few tangible benefits for users, appears unlikely to become a stable revenue stream in the near or long term, and undermines Twitter’s basic utility for everyone. And most of his other potential ideas so far—like turning the platform into a payments processor, to name one example—are outlandish and unlikely at best.”

MIT Technology Review: Everything dies, including information

MIT Technology Review: Everything dies, including information. “Surely, we’re at a stage technologically where we might devise ways to make knowledge available and accessible forever. After all, the density of data storage is already incomprehensibly high. In the ever-­growing museum of the internet, one can move smoothly from images from the James Webb Space Telescope through diagrams explaining Pythagoras’s philosophy on the music of the spheres to a YouTube tutorial on blues guitar soloing. What more could you want? Quite a bit, according to the experts.”

Faculty Focus: How and Why to Evaluate Open Educational Resources (OERs)

Faculty Focus: How and Why to Evaluate Open Educational Resources (OERs). “I expected a good experience when I was asked to review an online course in the spring of 2022 that was comprised of OERs. Unfortunately, as I began reviewing the course the saying, ‘You get what you pay for’ kept going through my mind. But fortunately, it was a good reminder of how to avoid potential pitfalls when using OERs.”

The Verge: Welcome to hell, Elon

The Verge: Welcome to hell, Elon. “Twitter, the company, makes very little interesting technology; the tech stack is not the valuable asset. The asset is the user base: hopelessly addicted politicians, reporters, celebrities, and other people who should know better but keep posting anyway. You! You, Elon Musk, are addicted to Twitter. You’re the asset. You just bought yourself for $44 billion dollars.”

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: AI is plundering the imagination and replacing it with a slot machine

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: AI is plundering the imagination and replacing it with a slot machine. “These tools represent the complete corporate capture of the imagination, that most private and unpredictable part of the human mind. Professional artists aren’t a cause for worry. They’ll likely soon lose interest in a tool that makes all the important decisions for them. The concern is for everyone else. When tinkerers and hobbyists, doodlers and scribblers—not to mention kids just starting to perceive and explore the world—have this kind of instant gratification at their disposal, their curiosity is hijacked and extracted.” And here is my periodic reminder that I include articles in this section (opinion) with which I do not necessarily agree.

The Conversation: Citizens’ social media can provide an antidote to propaganda and disinformation

The Conversation: Citizens’ social media can provide an antidote to propaganda and disinformation. “In early October, the Pew Research Center released a report called ‘The Role of Alternative Social Media in the News and Information Environment.’ While the report is well-researched and reveals a great deal about the current state of digital media, news and right-wing propaganda, it is wrong about alternative social media.”

Opinion: We’re going to need an alternative to Twitter (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Opinion: We’re going to need an alternative to Twitter. “The Post’s report Thursday that Elon Musk is considering cutting 75 percent of Twitter’s workforce once his purchase of the company is finalized was alarming enough. I’m not exactly sure how many employees Twitter needs, but it’s hard to imagine that the site will improve or even maintain its current functionality with such a massive staffing reduction.”

Daring Fireball: Everything

Daring Fireball: Everything . “What we need isn’t an everything app. It’s an everything device, with small focused apps for features. You want to do more? Download — or better yet, create — a new app. And you’ve already got one in your pocket — or in your hand, as you read this very sentence on it — right now.”