BusinessDay: Africa must reap the benefits of its own data

BusinessDay: Africa must reap the benefits of its own data. “Today, an AI algorithm is not a competitive advantage but data is. The World Economic Forum calls data the new ‘oxygen’, while Chinese AI specialist Kai-Fu Lee calls it the new ‘oil’. Africa’s population is increasing faster than in any region in the world. The continent has a population of 1.3-billion people and a total nominal GDP of $2.3-trillion. This increase in the population is in effect an increase in data, and if data is the new oil, it is akin to an increase in oil reserve.”

The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products (Hacker Noon)

Hacker Noon: The Instagram of Trust: How to Redesign the Architecture of Trust in Products. “More technology requires us to give up our privacy for the cost of better personalization. But how to fix the issue of ever growing lack of trust in our society? More and more brands are asking people for trust based on their promises and by being transparent about its policies. But the psychology of trust works quite differently. There have been many attempts and debates happening around the black box of algorithms and being transparent about how the algorithms work. But I would like to ask: Is transparency enough? Is it an effective way to build a long-lasting relationship with a customer? Is it going to build trust in a brand and in a product?”

Quartz: Inequality is a notification we see every time we scroll through our news feed

Quartz: Inequality is a notification we see every time we scroll through our news feed. “At no other point in history have the underclasses of society better understood how the wealthy live. The chimera of life’s material desires is everywhere thanks to the prismatic filters of Instagram and Snapchat. They range from the infinitely absurd—stacks of cash on yachts moored in Monaco—to the mundane made exotic, like lattes sprinkled with gold flakes. This is the currency of social media: the privilege of enviable experience hoarded by the already rich and influential.”

The New Yorker: Can “Indie” Social Media Save Us?

The New Yorker: Can “Indie” Social Media Save Us?. “On the one hand, we’ve grown wary of the so-called attention economy, which, in the name of corporate profits, exploits our psychological vulnerabilities in ways that corrode social life, diminish privacy, weaken civic cohesion, and make us vulnerable to manipulation. But we also benefit from social media and hesitate to disengage from it completely.”

Harvard Business Review: Machines that Speak and Write Will Make Misinformation Worse

Harvard Business Review: Machines that Speak and Write Will Make Misinformation Worse. “Technologists have long dreamed of building machines that converse as nimbly as humans. Early practitioners famously underestimated the magnitude of the challenge. Yet in 2019, we appear to be mere steps from the goal. The world’s dominant technology players are rushing to create software — whether intelligent or not — that can both converse and write as effectively as humans. So, what’s the problem? We are not adequately prepared to address the hazards that could come with our successful launch of conversational machines. To anticipate the challenges ahead, it helps to take a quick look at the underlying technologies.”

Forbes: Is Social Media Curating Hate And Scouring The Web For Our Greatest Fears?

Forbes: Is Social Media Curating Hate And Scouring The Web For Our Greatest Fears?. “Social media’s great promise was to connect the world. Yet rather than aggregate the world into a single real-time firehose, social platforms have increasingly turned to algorithmic curation to hand-feed us a perfectly personalized filter that appeals to our most intimate and powerful interests, desires and fears.”