Fast Company: There’s a simple way to reduce extreme political rhetoric on Facebook and Twitter

Fast Company: There’s a simple way to reduce extreme political rhetoric on Facebook and Twitter. “As major tech companies struggle with their responsibilities to the users and communities they serve, the question of what political candidates should be allowed to say in their online postings has emerged as a flash point. Each of the various platforms have taken different approaches to this question, but they each ignore the most important consideration of all: Why is it more advantageous online for a political candidate to be sensational rather than measured?”

Reddit CEO: Remember the Human – Black Lives Matter

Reddit CEO: Remember the Human – Black Lives Matter. “We work for this platform because we care deeply about community and belonging. But community and belonging are not possible without safety from violence, and now is the time to stand in solidarity with the Black members of our communities (locally, at Reddit Inc., on Reddit, and beyond). As Snoos, we do not tolerate hate, racism, and violence, and while we have work to do to fight these on our platform, our values are clear.”

EFF: The Executive Order Targeting Social Media Gets the FTC, Its Job, and the Law Wrong

EFF: The Executive Order Targeting Social Media Gets the FTC, Its Job, and the Law Wrong. “The inaptly named Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship seeks to insert the federal government into private Internet speech in several ways. In particular, Sections 4 and 5 seek to address possible deceptive practices, but end up being unnecessary at best and legally untenable at worst.”

The Atlantic: Trump Is a Problem That Twitter Cannot Fix

The Atlantic: Trump Is a Problem That Twitter Cannot Fix. “For some people, the answer is simple: If a tweet violates Twitter’s official rules, it should come down regardless of who posted it. If anything, the more powerful the figure, the greater potential they have to cause harm. But in democratic societies, at least, this isn’t always obviously the right answer. Democracy is based on the idea that voters should have access to information about who their candidates really are and what they believe. This remains true even (or, perhaps, especially) when those beliefs are abhorrent. And in a world where Twitter is but one of many megaphones at public figures’ disposal, the supposed benefit or efficacy of removing such content is debatable.”

South China Morning Post: Why delay in passing Hong Kong archives law does not surprise

South China Morning Post: Why delay in passing Hong Kong archives law does not surprise. “Delay would appear to be the default position for matters relating to government records and archives. It is now seven years since the Law Reform Commission, at the request of the administration, established a subcommittee to consider the need for legislation for the management of government records and archives, and the public is still waiting for the subcommittee’s final report and recommendations.”

Inside Higher Ed: Teaching With Digital Archives in the First-Year Writing Classroom

Inside Higher Ed: Teaching With Digital Archives in the First-Year Writing Classroom. “When this semester started, I started exploring the possibility of incorporating the use of digital archives in my first-year writing course, titled Border Stories: Power, Poetics and Architecture. In ideal circumstances, I would have loved to take my students to the physical space of the archives, but I decided against it because it would have required more advance planning and coordination with archivists that I did not have the time or the scope for in a writing classroom. Although the class lesson on digital archives happened before universities shifted to remote learning, I think digital archives can be a useful tool for instruction during virtual learning. Besides, I was not too sure whether the physical archives in Pittsburgh would be relevant for the course themes, and therefore digital archives seemed to be the best alternative option.”

BuzzMachine: The open information ecosystem

BuzzMachine: The open information ecosystem. “Media are no longer the deliverers of information. The information has already been delivered. So the question now for journalists is how — and whether — we add value to that stream of information. In this matter, as in our current crisis, we have much to learn from medicine. In microcosm, the impact of the new, open information ecosystem is evident in the COVID-19 pandemic as scientists grapple with an avalanche of brand new research papers, which appear — prior to peer review and publication — on so-called preprint servers, followed by much expert discussion on social media. Note that the servers carry the important caveat that their contents ‘should not be reported in news media as established information.'”