OneZero: A Pseudonym Helped Me Cultivate a Healthier Relationship With Social Media

OneZero: A Pseudonym Helped Me Cultivate a Healthier Relationship With Social Media. “We face a universal problem: how to manage your personal and professional identities. How much is too much when it comes to what you share? How much do you rely on social media to manage your life or to fill a void? It all comes down to boundaries. Boundaries are about building imaginary fences around real things.”

Gross overreach: Ancestry. com was right to block access to DNA database (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Gross overreach: Ancestry. com was right to block access to DNA database. “Privacy has become a naive, even passe idea in the minds of many Americans, particularly those raised in a world where social media, smartphones and the Patriot Act are the norm. But the increasing popularity of DNA testing services, in which people pay to have their DNA analyzed and stored by private companies, has set the stage for an important new battleground in the war on privacy.”

Slate: Professors, Don’t Be Scared. Teaching Online Is Great.

Slate: Professors, Don’t Be Scared. Teaching Online Is Great.. “Twitter is full of critics as classes move online. As one tweeted: ‘These teachers really think these online classes gonna work? Half the time they not even tech savvy enough to log into their gmails.’ But teaching online wasn’t that different from the classroom experience I was accustomed to. It was often more fun than standing at a lectern working through a well-worn set of PowerPoint slides.”

CNET: Alexa and Google Assistant are developing personalities

CNET: Alexa and Google Assistant are developing personalities. “Google Assistant may be the most naturalistic voice assistant yet, but neither it nor Alexa and Siri are close to achieving the sentience you see in movies like Her. They won’t be your friend, your significant other or (if 2001: A Space Odyssey is more your bag) your mortal enemy. But your relationships with them could have further reaching consequences than you think.”

Medium: How Not to Be an Asshole on the Internet

Medium, and I apologize for the swearing: How Not to Be an Asshole on the Internet. “A 2017 study seemed to prove what those of us familiar with online debates have feared for years: People we disagree with seem less human to us when we read their views than when we hear them spoken aloud. Results from a separate 2017 study might help explain why. One: Voices convey emotion, both through the content of what a person says and in how they say it. And two: Intimacy can change everything in these contexts. Seeing someone’s face all the time creates a kind of expertise that allows a person to understand another’s mental state just by looking at them. There’s evidence to suggest that it’s also possible to have this transformation on social media, where we are increasingly conducting our lives.”

Just Security: A Model for Countering Foreign Disinformation and Interference in Elections

Just Security: A Model for Countering Foreign Disinformation and Interference in Elections. “The lessons from 9/11 are instructive and should be internalized in considering what an effective whole-of-government response might look like in the context of countering foreign disinformation and interference in elections.”

Column: COVID-19 could kill the for-profit science publishing model. That would be a good thing (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Column: COVID-19 could kill the for-profit science publishing model. That would be a good thing. “Of all the ways the current coronavirus crisis has upended commonplace routines — such as disrupting global supply chains and forcing workers to stay at home — one of the most positive is how it demonstrates the value of open access to scientific research. Ferreting out a silver lining in an event that has produced the infection of more than 90,000 individuals and taken the lives of more than 3,000 — and is certain to wreak further destruction before it is quelled — is a delicate matter.”