Wired: Facebook and Google must do more to support Wikipedia

Wired: Facebook and Google must do more to support Wikipedia. “As companies draw on Wikipedia for knowledge – and as a bulwark against bad information – we believe they too have an opportunity to be generous. At Wikimedia, we already love and deeply appreciate the millions of people around the world who make generous charitable contributions because they believe in our values. But we also believe that we deserve lasting, commensurate support from the organisations that derive significant and sustained financial value from our work.”

Quartz: Quitting Instagram taught me how to truly experience and document my life again

Quartz: Quitting Instagram taught me how to truly experience and document my life again. “I was born in 1996, making me one of the older members of GenZ, or ‘iGen’—a generation defined by (and often critiqued for) its dependency on smartphones and the internet. I joined Facebook and Instagram in high school, and the platforms have had a huge influence on my life’s social dynamics since then—so much so, that quitting one of them forced me to relearn how to authentically experience my life offline.”

The Next Web: Religion isn’t the opiate of the masses — AI is

The Next Web: Religion isn’t the opiate of the masses — AI is. “Overall leisure time has increased by over an hour per day in the past ten years. How are we spending these extra 365 hours per year? Not playing with our kids, working on passion projects, exercising, or any other wholesome activity you may have guessed — we’re spending it in front of screens.”

Bye, Chrome: Why I’m switching to Firefox and you should too (Fast Company Design)

Fast Company Design: Bye, Chrome: Why I’m switching to Firefox and you should too. “While the amount of data about me may not have caused harm in my life yet–as far as I know–I don’t want to be the victim of monopolistic internet oligarchs as they continue to cash in on surveillance-based business models. What’s a concerned citizen of the internet to do? Here’s one no-brainer: Stop using Chrome and switch to Firefox.”

Digital Content Next: Facebook’s political ad disclosures are a train wreck in progress

Digital Content Next: Facebook’s political ad disclosures are a train wreck in progress. “So far… the disclosure rules at Facebook are not just a work in progress, but more of a train wreck in progress, as flaws with Facebook’s new rules are already emerging. The social giant was supposed to archive all political ads publicly but missed some, and critics have complained that they aren’t giving enough information about how the ads are targeted. And some many publishers are getting caught up in the rules and can’t boost their own political stories on Facebook without jumping through hoops. An effort by the News Media Alliance to get publishers whitelisted has started, but so far Facebook doesn’t have plans to do that. It’s clear that more overarching, consistent rules across social media and the web — not just from Facebook and other tech giants — are needed to monitor political ads on the internet.”

Monopoly Money: How to Break Up the Biggest Companies in Tech (The Ringer)

The Ringer: Monopoly Money: How to Break Up the Biggest Companies in Tech. “Even if the world’s most powerful companies have amassed monopoly power in certain sectors, regulators must prove that they exert that power in a way that harms consumers or stifles competition. It’s an especially tricky argument to make against firms that offer free or cheap services via the internet. The tech giants, which have largely been allowed to grow unfettered since the Microsoft lawsuit, often argue that a competing option is just a click away. But that reasoning looks increasingly specious in an era when Google functions as a verb, Facebook owns two of the biggest social networks, and Amazon is powering a huge portion of the internet.”