EFF: Social Media Platforms Increase Transparency About Content Removal Requests, But Many Keep Users in the Dark When Their Speech Is Censored, EFF Report Shows

EFF: Social Media Platforms Increase Transparency About Content Removal Requests, But Many Keep Users in the Dark When Their Speech Is Censored, EFF Report Shows. “San Francisco and Tunis, Tunisia—While social media platforms are increasingly giving users the opportunity to appeal decisions to censor their posts, very few platforms comprehensively commit to notifying users that their content has been removed in the first place, raising questions about their accountability and transparency, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) said today in a new report. “

Fines Aren’t Enough: Here’s How the FTC Can Make Facebook Better (EFF)

EFF: Fines Aren’t Enough: Here’s How the FTC Can Make Facebook Better. “A $3 billion fine would be, by far, the largest privacy-related fine in the FTC’s history. The biggest to date was $22.5 million, levied against Google in 2012. But even after setting aside $3 billion to cover a potential fine, Facebook still managed to rake in $3.3 billion in profit during the first quarter of 2019. It’s rumored that Facebook will agree to create a ‘privacy committee’ as part of this settlement. But the company needs to change its actions, not just its org chart. That’s why the settlement the FTC is negotiating now also needs to include limits on Facebook’s behavior.”

EFF: Content Moderation is Broken. Let Us Count the Ways.

EFF: Content Moderation is Broken. Let Us Count the Ways.. “Many of us view content moderation as a given, an integral component of modern social media. But the specific contours of the system were hardly foregone conclusions. In the early days of social media, decisions about what to allow and what not to were often made by small teams or even individuals, and often on the fly. And those decisions continue to shape our social media experience today.”

Ars Technica: Twitter blocks EFF tweet that criticized bogus takedown of a previous tweet

Ars Technica: Twitter blocks EFF tweet that criticized bogus takedown of a previous tweet. “Twitter and Starz have given us a new example of how copyright enforcement can easily go overboard. At Starz’s request, Twitter blocked an April 8 tweet by the news site TorrentFreak, which had posted a link to one of its news articles about piracy.” The tweets have been restored, but this is not a good look.

BetaNews: Block more Google tracking with the latest Privacy Badger extension

BetaNews: Block more Google tracking with the latest Privacy Badger extension. “We live in an age where privacy is simultaneously highly valued and under increasing attack — and nowhere is this truer than online. The EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) has been fighting the corner for web users for some time, and with the latest version of its Privacy Badger extension it is helping people fight back against Google.”

Between You, Me, and Google: Problems With Gmail’s “Confidential Mode” (EFF)

EFF: Between You, Me, and Google: Problems With Gmail’s “Confidential Mode”. “With Gmail’s new design rolled out to more and more users, many have had a chance to try out its new ‘Confidential Mode.’ While many of its features sound promising, what ‘Confidential Mode’ provides isn’t confidentiality. At best, the new mode might create expectations that it fails to meet around security and privacy in Gmail. We fear that Confidential Mode will make it less likely for users to find and use other, more secure communication alternatives. And at worst, Confidential Mode will push users further into Google’s own walled garden while giving them what we believe are misleading assurances of privacy and security.”

Techdirt: Researchers Reveal Details Of Printer Tracking Dots, Develop Free Software To Defeat It

Techdirt: Researchers Reveal Details Of Printer Tracking Dots, Develop Free Software To Defeat It. “As Techdirt has reported previously in the case of Reality Leigh Winner, most modern color laser printers place tiny yellow tracking dots on every page printed — what Wikipedia calls ‘printer steganography’. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) first started warning about this sneaky form of surveillance back in 2005. It published a list of printers and whether it was known that they used tracking dots.”