EFF: Don’t Write Copyright Law in Secret

EFF: Don’t Write Copyright Law in Secret. “The USMCA is just the latest example: when copyright terms are negotiated in private, multinational agreements, it tends to favor the interests of large media companies. Countries should decide their own copyright laws by inclusive, democratic processes, not through secret negotiations. Those copyright law expansions bring real threats to human rights in the countries where the United States exports them. In 2011, Colombian graduate student Diego Gomez shared another student’s Master’s thesis with colleagues over the Internet, sparking a six-year legal battle that could have put him in prison for years.”

EFF: ICANN Needs To Ask More Questions About the Sale of .ORG

EFF: ICANN Needs To Ask More Questions About the Sale of .ORG. “Over 21,000 people, 660 organizations, and now six Members of Congress have asked ICANN, the organization that regulates the Internet’s domain name system, to halt the $1.135 billion deal that would hand control over PIR, the .ORG domain registry, to private equity. There are crucial reasons this sale is facing significant backlash from the nonprofit and NGO communities who make the .ORG domain their online home, and perhaps none of them are more concerning than the speed of the deal and the dangerous lack of transparency that’s accompanied it.”

Neowin: Open letter from 50+ organizations want Google to do something about Android bloatware

Neowin: Open letter from 50+ organizations want Google to do something about Android bloatware. “Over 50 organizations including the Privacy International, Digital Rights Foundation, DuckDuckGo, and Electronic Frontier Foundation have written an open letter to Alphabet and Google’s CEO Sundar Pichai about exploitive pre-installed bloatware on Android devices and how they pose a privacy risk to consumers.”

Neowin: EFF launches SaveDotOrg campaign as Public Interest Registry sale announced

Neowin: EFF launches SaveDotOrg campaign as Public Interest Registry sale announced. “The Electronic Frontier Foundation, along with a variety of other web entities such as Creative Commons and Internet Archive, have launched the SaveDotOrg campaign which urges the Internet Society (ISOC) to cancel the sale of the Public Interest Registry (PIR) to Ethos Capital, the largest private equity firm in sub-Saharan Africa.”

EFF: Social Media Platforms Increase Transparency About Content Removal Requests, But Many Keep Users in the Dark When Their Speech Is Censored, EFF Report Shows

EFF: Social Media Platforms Increase Transparency About Content Removal Requests, But Many Keep Users in the Dark When Their Speech Is Censored, EFF Report Shows. “San Francisco and Tunis, Tunisia—While social media platforms are increasingly giving users the opportunity to appeal decisions to censor their posts, very few platforms comprehensively commit to notifying users that their content has been removed in the first place, raising questions about their accountability and transparency, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) said today in a new report. “

Fines Aren’t Enough: Here’s How the FTC Can Make Facebook Better (EFF)

EFF: Fines Aren’t Enough: Here’s How the FTC Can Make Facebook Better. “A $3 billion fine would be, by far, the largest privacy-related fine in the FTC’s history. The biggest to date was $22.5 million, levied against Google in 2012. But even after setting aside $3 billion to cover a potential fine, Facebook still managed to rake in $3.3 billion in profit during the first quarter of 2019. It’s rumored that Facebook will agree to create a ‘privacy committee’ as part of this settlement. But the company needs to change its actions, not just its org chart. That’s why the settlement the FTC is negotiating now also needs to include limits on Facebook’s behavior.”

EFF: Content Moderation is Broken. Let Us Count the Ways.

EFF: Content Moderation is Broken. Let Us Count the Ways.. “Many of us view content moderation as a given, an integral component of modern social media. But the specific contours of the system were hardly foregone conclusions. In the early days of social media, decisions about what to allow and what not to were often made by small teams or even individuals, and often on the fly. And those decisions continue to shape our social media experience today.”