Stanford Medicine: With chicken eggs and household supplies, undergraduates blaze a path toward low-cost antiviral

Stanford Medicine: With chicken eggs and household supplies, undergraduates blaze a path toward low-cost antiviral. “Stanford researchers, including six undergraduate students, have created an inexpensive method for making nasal drops that could stem the spread of viruses such as COVID-19. The approach could be particularly useful for people living in low-resource countries. Using chicken eggs and household items, they devised a way to extract and purify antibodies present in yolks — called immunoglobulin Y (IgY) — that are proven to be safe and may prevent or treat many infectious diseases.”

Niki Bezzant: Shining light on food facts (New Zealand Herald)

New Zealand Herald: Niki Bezzant: Shining light on food facts. “We still don’t have, for example, proper country-of-origin labelling on foods. We’re maybe halfway there — fresh and frozen fruits, vegetables, meats, fish and seafood will soon be required to display their country of origin, and that’s a great start. But we’re a long way from easily knowing where everything we eat has come from. A couple of good initiatives have recently started, though, which give us access to more information about some of our food if we want it.” One of the resources mentioned looks very NZ-oriented, but the other, about added sugars in foods, looks useful to everybody…

Yahoo News: 15,000 Eggs Delivered To Norwegian Olympic Team After Google Translate Error

Yahoo News: 15,000 Eggs Delivered To Norwegian Olympic Team After Google Translate Error. “Google Translate can sometimes get scrambled, as the chefs for the Norwegian Winter Olympics team learned the hard way this week. Needing some eggs to feed their athletes while in Pyeongchang, South Korea, the chefs told Norway’s Aftenposten newspaper that they’d turned to the online translation tool to help them draft an order for a local grocery store.”