Exploring Egypt: UWL professor, alums creating 3D database of ancient statues (University of Wisconsin La Crosse)

University of Wisconsin La Crosse: Exploring Egypt: UWL professor, alums creating 3D database of ancient statues. “UWL’s David Anderson is bringing people as close to that experience as possible through photogrammetry — the science of using photographs to produce 3D immersive models. Anderson and two of his former students spent January 2022 working on a new project at the Mut Temple in Luxor, Egypt, photographing nearly 300 statues of the lioness-headed goddess Sekhmet. The photos will be stitched together into moveable, 3D models that can be viewed by anyone anywhere with a phone or computer.”

University of Notre Dame: Literatures of Annihilation, Exile, and Resistance Launches New Website

University of Notre Dame: Literatures of Annihilation, Exile, and Resistance Launches New Website. “The new website includes an archive of recorded events featuring transnational writers and scholars from Iraq, Iran, Palestine, Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, Colombia, Chile and the United States whose work bears witness to truth and history and to the global struggle for freedom.”

Washington Post: Nothing said Cairo quite like the ever-present water pipe — until Egypt banned them to fight covid

Washington Post: Nothing said Cairo quite like the ever-present water pipe — until Egypt banned them to fight covid. “Egypt is one of several countries in the Middle East, including Lebanon, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, where shisha bans have been enforced during the pandemic. The popular pipes, also known as hookahs and narghiles, are often passed between friends, potentially transmitting the virus. But while some other countries have gradually lifted restrictions, Egyptian authorities have maintained their crackdown. Photos published in state-run media depict the aftermath of raids, the pipes lined up in rows like criminals. This month, photos showed a front loader running over 76 shishas laid on a street in a city north of Cairo.”

CNET: Mummy of beloved pharaoh digitally ‘unwrapped’ after 3,000 years

CNET: Mummy of beloved pharaoh digitally ‘unwrapped’ after 3,000 years. “Scientists have unwrapped nearly every mummy discovered thus far, finding remarkable evidence of things like traditional burial practices and unique facial features. But for three millennia, one Egyptian pharaoh’s remains, discovered in 1881, have been left untouched for fear of tampering with their stunning condition. That ruler was Amenhotep I. Thanks to the age of computing, though, the royal mummy has finally been unveiled. A team of researchers digitally exhumed Amenhotep I’s body using computing tomography imaging, a sort of X-ray imaging process.”

Jerusalem Post: Post six-day war footage of Egyptian Monastery made public by Israel’s national library

Jerusalem Post: Post six-day war footage of Egyptian Monastery made public by Israel’s national library . “Some 1,600 Christian manuscripts and numerous photographs and film footage from after the Six Day War are now available for free public viewing, the National Library of Israel (NLI) has announced. The documents were originally archived at Saint Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. Founded by Justinian I over 1,500 years ago, the monastery is home to the oldest functional library in the world.”

Ahram Online: Egyptian Museum in Tahrir launches new website

Ahram Online: Egyptian Museum in Tahrir launches new website. “The Egyptian Museum in Tahrir was inaugurated in 1902 to house a treasured collection of ancient Egyptian artefacts, a library for rare books and a conservation centre. The museum is now under development with a new lighting system, new displays, and visitor’s services. Late last month new electronic gates were installed.”

The Guardian: Egypt detains artist robot Ai-Da before historic pyramid show

The Guardian: Egypt detains artist robot Ai-Da before historic pyramid show. “Ai-Da is due to open and present her work at the Great Pyramid of Giza on Thursday, the first time contemporary art has been allowed next to the pyramid in thousands of years. But because of ‘security issues’ that may include concerns that she is part of a wider espionage plot, both Ai-Da and her sculpture were held in Egyptian customs for 10 days before being released on Wednesday, sparking a diplomatic fracas.”

Daily Beast: Trump’s Favorite Dictator Fueling New Pro-Hitler Movement

Daily Beast: Trump’s Favorite Dictator Fueling New Pro-Hitler Movement. “The movement’s digital goosestepping is being led by a small handful of Nazis claiming connections to the Egyptian Armed Forces on Telegram, who are also attempting to build a community on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter. At the center of the network is a branded, cloud-based storage drive being shared across a series of Telegram channels as well as Facebook pages and profiles, containing 16,922 multilingual pieces of Nazi footage, photos, text, and Holocaust denial videos, all meticulously ordered in 416 folders. Repeated calls to the Egyptian military’s media office went unanswered.”

Live Science: Book of the Dead fragments, half a world apart, are pieced together

Live Science: Book of the Dead fragments, half a world apart, are pieced together. “The two linen fragments were pieced together after a digital image of one segment was cataloged on an open-source online database by the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Historians at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles who saw the image quickly realized that the institute had a shroud fragment that, like a puzzle piece, fit together with the New Zealand segment.”

BBC: Egypt detains female TikTok star after human trafficking conviction

BBC: Egypt detains female TikTok star after human trafficking conviction. “The verdict came five months after another court overturned prison sentences that [Haneen] Hossam and [Mawada] Adham were given for ‘violating family values’ with videos they posted on TikTok. Human rights activists say the two women have been prosecuted as part of a crackdown by Egyptian authorities targeting female social media influencers on charges that violate their rights to privacy, freedom of expression, non-discrimination and bodily autonomy.”

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt. “When British Egyptologist Flinders Petrie came to Egypt in 1883 he explored several archaeological sites and revealed some of the country’s ancient history. According to Egyptian law at the time, archaeological dig sponsors had full rights to half of finds, while Egypt retained the other half. Half a century after Petrie’s death, the British Museum in London started cataloguing some of the artefacts he unearthed in Egypt, especially those in possession of the 60 museums involved in sponsoring Petrie’s excavation missions. The exciting news is that early this month they began preparing to catalogue them in an online searchable database format.”

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire. “In Egypt, it was customary to mummify the deceased and create a likeness of them, often in the form of a mummy mask or an anthropoid (human-form) coffin. From the first to third centuries AD, after Egypt had become a province of the Roman Empire, the traditional practice of mummification continued but a new trend also arose: some individuals chose to be represented in portraits painted on thin wooden panels or linen burial shrouds that were affixed to their mummy wrappings. These mummy portraits were part of ancient Egyptian traditions and their preparations for the afterlife…. Discover more about these mummy portraits and the stories they tell, in the new Google Arts & Culture exhibition: Faces of Roman Egypt.”

Ars Technica: Egyptologists translate the oldest-known mummification manual

Ars Technica: Egyptologists translate the oldest-known mummification manual. “Egyptologists have recently translated the oldest-known mummification manual. Translating it required solving a literal puzzle; the medical text that includes the manual is currently in pieces, with half of what remains in the Louvre Museum in France and half at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. A few sections are completely missing, but what’s left is a treatise on medicinal herbs and skin diseases, especially the ones that cause swelling. Surprisingly, one section of that text includes a short manual on embalming.”