Middle East Monitor: Egypt releases social media influencer jailed for ‘immoral videos’

Middle East Monitor: Egypt releases social media influencer jailed for ‘immoral videos’. “TikTok influencer Manar Samy has been released from Egyptian jail on a bail of 20,000 Egyptian pounds ($1,253) after being arrested earlier this month for posting ‘immoral videos’. Samy was sentenced to three years imprisonment earlier this month on charges of “inciting debauchery, immorality and stirring up instincts” through her online videos, according to a prosecution statement.”

Egypt: Apparent Covid-19 Outbreaks in Prisons (Human Rights Watch)

Human Rights Watch: Egypt: Apparent Covid-19 Outbreaks in Prisons. “Accounts by witnesses to Human Rights Watch, leaked letters from two prisons, as well as credible reports by local rights groups and media indicate that at least 14 prisoners and detainees have died, most likely from Covid-19 complications, in 10 detention facilities as of July 15. Even though scores of prisoners and detainees, at a minimum, have shown mild to severe Covid-19 symptoms, prisons had insufficient medical care and virtually no access to testing for the virus or symptom screening. The authorities have released about 13,000 prisoners since late February, but that number is insufficient to ease overcrowding in congested prisons and jails.”

Arab News: Google’s new tool lets you translate Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics

Arab News: Google’s new tool lets you translate Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics. “If you’ve ever wondered what messages the Ancient Egyptians were trying to convey with their hieroglyphics, Google’s new tool might just be able to help. In celebration of the anniversary of the discovery of the Rosetta Stone, Google Arts and Culture has released a new AI-powered tool, Fabricius, that allows you to decode and translate the ancient symbols and characters into both Arabic and English.”

Arab News: Egypt court jails belly dancer for ‘debauchery’ in social media crackdown

Arab News: Egypt court jails belly dancer for ‘debauchery’ in social media crackdown. “A high-profile Egyptian belly-dancer, Sama el-Masry, was sentenced to three years in prison and fined 300,000 Egyptian pounds ($18,500) on Saturday for inciting debauchery and immorality as part of a crackdown on social media postings. El-Masry was arrested in April during an investigation into videos and photos on social media, including the popular video-sharing platform TikTok, that the public prosecution described as sexually suggestive.”

Egypt: Female social media influencers under attack (North Africa Journal)

North Africa Journal: Egypt: Female social media influencers under attack. “Young Egyptian women with thousands of followers each on the popular TikTok app have become the latest target of state authorities who accuse them of spreading ‘immorality’ in society. Since President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi came to power in 2014, hundreds of journalists, activists, lawyers and intellectuals have been arrested and many websites blocked in the name of state security. But in recent months a popular group of female social media ‘influencers’ has also drawn the ire of the government, and several have been arrested in a crackdown cheered by many in the deeply conservative country. “

Coronavirus: Egypt doctors accuse government over medics’ deaths (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Egypt doctors accuse government over medics’ deaths. “Doctors have accused Egypt’s health ministry of negligence in its handling of Covid-19 and said it bears ‘full responsibility’ for medics’ deaths. A union said on Monday that 19 doctors had so far died from the disease and more than 350 others had been infected. It blamed a lack of personal protective equipment and beds for sickened staff, and warned the system could ‘collapse’.”

EurekAlert: Unique digital archive of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution now online

EurekAlert: Unique digital archive of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution now online. “A new digital archive co-created by University of Warwick researcher Dr Nicola Pratt gathers art, music and film created during the 2011 Egyptian revolution into a unique new multimedia resource for scholars, students and the general public alike. ‘Politics, Popular Culture and the 2011 Egyptian Revolution’ documents the 25 January 2011 uprising and its aftermath through the prism of popular culture, showing how Egyptians have narrated their own histories of the revolution through graffiti, music, satire, TV drama series and film.”

Exclusive – Egyptians Turn to Jokes to Break Fear Barrier amid Coronavirus (Asharq Al-Awsat)

Asharq Al-Awsat: Exclusive – Egyptians Turn to Jokes to Break Fear Barrier amid Coronavirus. “Traffic in Cairo, which used to move at 11 kilometers an hour before the virus struck, has now reached humanly possible limits. The choice to remain in self-isolation is being laxly implemented during the day and turns into curfew at night at the order of the prime minister. This has weighed heavily on nighttime internet traffic. People have clamored to send and receive information about the pandemic, but above all else, they exchange jokes in order to break the barrier of fear.”

CNET: Facebook pulls down hundreds of fake accounts tied to marketing firms in India and Egypt

CNET: Facebook pulls down hundreds of fake accounts tied to marketing firms in India and Egypt. “Facebook in February removed hundreds of accounts and pages tied to deceptive campaigns that appear to be from Egyptian and Indian marketing firms, the company said Monday. The takedowns are part of the social media giant’s efforts to crack down on what it calls ‘coordinated inauthentic behavior,’ which involves creating dozens or hundreds of fake accounts and using them to promote ideologies and drive users to deceptive content on other websites.”

Egyptian Streets: Why Egyptian Minister Rania Al-Mashat’s Social Media Activity Matters

Egyptian Streets: Why Egyptian Minister Rania Al-Mashat’s Social Media Activity Matters. “My lack of attention to the other political figures in Egypt and their work could be explained by their little to very much absent activity online. Each time I searched a name, it was mainly the ministry’s main page that would come up, or a poorly activated social media account….Yet Rania Al-Mashat’s social media activity, on the other hand, is active, managed, and distinctive from the official ministry’s account. Though I did not track her increase of followers or engagement over time, one can simply look at the comments and reactions to her posts and recognize how her social media activity is building a profile for her and her work.

Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life (BBC)

BBC: Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life. “When Nesyamun died, his voice fell silent, but 3,000 years on, a team of researchers have brought it back to life. They have done so by producing a 3D-printed voice box based Nesyamun’s vocal tract, which was scanned to establish its precise dimensions. By using the vocal tract with an artificial larynx sound, they synthesised a vowel sound meant to be similar to the voice of Nesyamun.”

Egypt’s golden age of cinema: hundreds of rare photos come to Abu Dhabi (The National)

The National: Egypt’s golden age of cinema: hundreds of rare photos come to Abu Dhabi . “More than 600 never-before-seen photographs from Egyptian cinema have been released online by Akkasah, the Centre for Photography at NYU Abu Dhabi. The collection of photographs and negatives belonging to Samir Farid, a prominent Egyptian writer, scholar, and leading film critic, was donated to the centre. It features a wide range of negatives taken on sets of various Egyptian films, from publicity shots, to candid pictures of cast and crew, and images captured while filming behind the scenes.”

Phys .org: Israeli museum explains the emojis of ancient Egypt

Phys .org: Israeli museum explains the emojis of ancient Egypt. “How does an academic explain the importance of ancient hieroglyphics to modern audiences glued to their phones? Through the cunning use of emojis. The Israel Museum in Jerusalem this week opened the ‘Emoglyphs’ exhibition, comparing the pictograms of antiquity to those of today.”

Middle East Monitor: Egypt plans social media tax

Middle East Monitor: Egypt plans social media tax . “Egypt plans to impose a tax system on online advertising and social media websites, the New Arab reported the deputy finance minister saying. Riyad Abdel Sattar said that Facebook and Twitter users should pay a monthly registration fee which will enable the state to monitor online activity.”