Politico: Egypt’s COP27 summit app is a cyber weapon, experts warn

Politico: Egypt’s COP27 summit app is a cyber weapon, experts warn. “Western security advisers are warning delegates at the COP27 climate summit not to download the host Egyptian government’s official smartphone app, amid fears it could be used to hack their private emails, texts and even voice conversations. Policymakers from Germany, France and Canada were among those who had downloaded the app by November 8, according to two separate Western security officials briefed on discussions within these delegations at the U.N. climate summit.”

Gale: University of Washington Students Unlock New Historical Connections on King Tut’s Tomb Using Gale Digital Scholar Lab (PRESS RELEASE)

Gale: University of Washington Students Unlock New Historical Connections on King Tut’s Tomb Using Gale Digital Scholar Lab (PRESS RELEASE). “For the first time in nearly 100 years, scholars and the curious public can see one of the most significant archaeological discoveries of the 20th century in a new light. The Tutankhamun Centenary: 1922–2022 is a website showcasing University of Washington students’ groundbreaking digital humanities (DH) research to mark a century since the discovery of King Tutankhamun’s (King Tut’s) tomb.”

3D tour: explore the Great Pyramid (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: 3D tour: explore the Great Pyramid. “Inside the Great Pyramid is a 3D tour of Khufu’s enormous tomb, painstakingly scanned by Luke Hollis. It works just like the ones on real estate websites, but this one’s not for sale at any price (besides, it looks like tweakers already stripped it for copper and anything else shiny).” VERY cool. Click the “Free Explore” link on the top right if you don’t want the tour and you just want to run around in the Pyramid by yourself.

Cairo Scene: The Digital Archive Preserving The Fading Art Of Egyptian Typography

Cairo Scene: The Digital Archive Preserving The Fading Art Of Egyptian Typography. “Exclusively focused on Arabic street typography in Egypt, the Egyptian Type Archive has amassed a loyal community on Instagram. They collectively document any text they stumble upon, from the quirky to the horrific to the beautiful, whether it’s an ancient sign on a vintage shop or an announcement sprayed on the walls of a local cafe.”

Scoop Empire: Reconnecting With The Past: Bibliotheca Alexandria Launches New Website To Teach Hieroglyphics

Scoop Empire: Reconnecting With The Past: Bibliotheca Alexandria Launches New Website To Teach Hieroglyphics. “The word hieroglyph literally translates to ‘sacred carvings’. The Egyptians first used hieroglyphs exclusively for inscriptions carved or painted on temple walls. This form of pictorial writing was also used on tombs, sheets of papyrus, wooden boards, potsherds, and fragments of limestone. It is an essential part of Egyptian history. Now, new initiatives are arising to teach hieroglyphics and one of them is by the Bibliotheca of Alexandria.” The article’s link takes you to the Arabic version of the Web site. Look for the English switch on the upper left part of the landing page.

Scoop Empire: Egypt’s Enduring Cassette Culture

Scoop Empire: Egypt’s Enduring Cassette Culture. “To rewind and get a better sense of the history of cassette culture in Egypt and its stubborn perseverance in the digital age, I spoke with Andrew Simon, a historian of popular culture and media in the Middle East who has taken a particular interest in Egyptian cassette culture. In his recently published book entitled Media of the Masses: Cassette Culture in Modern Egypt, Simon explores these questions and more in a thoroughly enjoyable deep-dive into Egyptian cassette culture and its cultural and political implications.”

EurekAlert: Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy

EurekAlert: Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy. “An international team led by researchers at McMaster University, working in collaboration with the University of Paris Cité, has identified and reconstructed the first ancient genome of E. coli, using fragments extracted from the gallstone of a 16th century mummy.”

Washington Post: Saving The Sounds Of An Ancient City

Washington Post: Saving The Sounds Of An Ancient City. “For the past several years, Youssef Sherif, 28, and Nehal Ezz, 26, have wandered the Egyptian capital in search of the cries of street vendors, the tap tap tap of metal workers in their shops, the cacophony of chaotic traffic. Their goal is to capture in recordings what Cairo sounds like — right here, right now — before these noises disappear. They are collecting the sounds to share on an Instagram account and eventually hope to establish a searchable database of sounds.”

Exploring Egypt: UWL professor, alums creating 3D database of ancient statues (University of Wisconsin La Crosse)

University of Wisconsin La Crosse: Exploring Egypt: UWL professor, alums creating 3D database of ancient statues. “UWL’s David Anderson is bringing people as close to that experience as possible through photogrammetry — the science of using photographs to produce 3D immersive models. Anderson and two of his former students spent January 2022 working on a new project at the Mut Temple in Luxor, Egypt, photographing nearly 300 statues of the lioness-headed goddess Sekhmet. The photos will be stitched together into moveable, 3D models that can be viewed by anyone anywhere with a phone or computer.”

University of Notre Dame: Literatures of Annihilation, Exile, and Resistance Launches New Website

University of Notre Dame: Literatures of Annihilation, Exile, and Resistance Launches New Website. “The new website includes an archive of recorded events featuring transnational writers and scholars from Iraq, Iran, Palestine, Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, Colombia, Chile and the United States whose work bears witness to truth and history and to the global struggle for freedom.”

Washington Post: Nothing said Cairo quite like the ever-present water pipe — until Egypt banned them to fight covid

Washington Post: Nothing said Cairo quite like the ever-present water pipe — until Egypt banned them to fight covid. “Egypt is one of several countries in the Middle East, including Lebanon, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, where shisha bans have been enforced during the pandemic. The popular pipes, also known as hookahs and narghiles, are often passed between friends, potentially transmitting the virus. But while some other countries have gradually lifted restrictions, Egyptian authorities have maintained their crackdown. Photos published in state-run media depict the aftermath of raids, the pipes lined up in rows like criminals. This month, photos showed a front loader running over 76 shishas laid on a street in a city north of Cairo.”

CNET: Mummy of beloved pharaoh digitally ‘unwrapped’ after 3,000 years

CNET: Mummy of beloved pharaoh digitally ‘unwrapped’ after 3,000 years. “Scientists have unwrapped nearly every mummy discovered thus far, finding remarkable evidence of things like traditional burial practices and unique facial features. But for three millennia, one Egyptian pharaoh’s remains, discovered in 1881, have been left untouched for fear of tampering with their stunning condition. That ruler was Amenhotep I. Thanks to the age of computing, though, the royal mummy has finally been unveiled. A team of researchers digitally exhumed Amenhotep I’s body using computing tomography imaging, a sort of X-ray imaging process.”

Jerusalem Post: Post six-day war footage of Egyptian Monastery made public by Israel’s national library

Jerusalem Post: Post six-day war footage of Egyptian Monastery made public by Israel’s national library . “Some 1,600 Christian manuscripts and numerous photographs and film footage from after the Six Day War are now available for free public viewing, the National Library of Israel (NLI) has announced. The documents were originally archived at Saint Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. Founded by Justinian I over 1,500 years ago, the monastery is home to the oldest functional library in the world.”