The Conversation: Russian Twitter propaganda predicted 2016 US election polls

The Conversation: Russian Twitter propaganda predicted 2016 US election polls. “In a statistical analysis published in First Monday , my team and I tracked the activity of Russian social media trolls on Twitter in the run up to the 2016 election. We then compared the fluctuating popularity of this propaganda with that of the two presidential candidates: Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. We found that exposure to Russian propaganda may have helped change American minds in favor of Republican candidate Trump.”

CNET: Facebook executive says there’s ‘no evidence’ Russians influenced Brexit vote

CNET: Facebook executive says there’s ‘no evidence’ Russians influenced Brexit vote. “Nick Clegg, the former UK deputy prime minister who now leads Facebook’s communications team, told the BBC in an interview that the world’s largest social network ran two analyses in the run-up to Brexit and couldn’t find proof of interference by other countries.”

The New York Times: Russia Sought to Use Social Media to Influence E.U. Vote, Report Finds

The New York Times: Russia Sought to Use Social Media to Influence E.U. Vote, Report Finds. “European authorities blamed Russian groups on Friday for disinformation campaigns designed to depress turnout and sway public opinion in last month’s European Union elections, an official accounting that underscored how Russian interference has not abated and that Facebook and other tech platforms remain vulnerable to meddling.”

Stanford University: Ahead of the 2020 election, Stanford experts urge a concerted, national response to confront foreign interference

Stanford University: Ahead of the 2020 election, Stanford experts urge a concerted, national response to confront foreign interference. “Scholars from Stanford University put forward a comprehensive strategy for what needs to be done to protect the integrity and independence of U.S. elections, with a keen focus on the upcoming presidential campaign in 2020.”

Twitterbots: Anatomy of a Propaganda Campaign (Symantec)

Symantec: Twitterbots: Anatomy of a Propaganda Campaign. “One of the main talking points of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign involved attempts to surreptitiously influence public opinion using social media campaigns. In the months after the election, it quickly became apparent that a sophisticated propaganda operation had been directed against American voters. Not surprisingly, news of these campaigns caused widespread public concern, prompting social media firms to launch investigations into whether their services had been misused. In October 2018, Twitter released a massive dataset of content posted on its service by the Internet Research Agency (IRA), a Russian company responsible for the largest propaganda campaign directed against the U.S.”

Brookings: Deepfakes, social media, and the 2020 election

Brookings: Deepfakes, social media, and the 2020 election. “What happens when you mix easy access to increasingly sophisticated technology for producing deepfake videos, a high-stakes election, and a social media ecosystem built on maximizing views, likes, and shares? America is about to find out.”

NBC News: Russian trolls who interfered in 2016 U.S. election also made ad money, report says

NBC News: Russian trolls who interfered in 2016 U.S. election also made ad money, report says. “The effort by a Russian internet deception factory to manipulate American public opinion during the 2016 election was better planned and executed — and also more lucrative — than previously understood, according to a new analysis of nearly 10 million tweets by a leading cybersecurity firm.”