BBC: BT fined for five million spam emails

BBC: BT fined for five million spam emails. “BT has been fined £77,000 by the Information Commissioner’s Office, after it sent nearly five million nuisance emails to customers. The investigation found that the telecoms company did not have customers’ consent for such direct marketing. The 4.9 million emails, sent between December 2015 and November 2016, promoted three charities.”

Ars Technica: FBI recovers $14M from bogus business account wire transfers

Ars Technica: FBI recovers $14M from bogus business account wire transfers. “Federal authorities announced Monday that they had “disrupted” what they call ‘Business Email Compromise’ schemes, which involve a malicious actor sending a phishing email and somehow convincing employees with access to a company’s financial credentials to transfer money fraudulently. The FBI added that $2.4 million dollars was seized, while $14 million in ‘fraudulent wire transfers’ was recovered.”

Ubergizmo: Old Gmail Design Now Being Phased Out By Google

Ubergizmo: Old Gmail Design Now Being Phased Out By Google. “It has only been a few weeks since the new Gmail design was officially confirmed by Google. The company first rolled it out for G Suite users, those who have paid company accounts, before bringing it to regular Gmail users as well. It has been gradually bringing the new design to more Gmail users across the globe but Google has now revealed plans to slowly phase out the old Gmail design for all users.” I hope it isn’t as bad as the Google News redesign.

How to sort and delete sets of Gmail messages: 4 steps (TechRepublic)

TechRepublic: How to sort and delete sets of Gmail messages: 4 steps. “You might want to mass delete email from Gmail for many reasons: To remove non-work-related messages from an account, to achieve ‘inbox zero’ as part of a personal productivity effort, or—more mundanely—to reduce the storage space used by attachments. Some people pursue #NoEmail—and start to treat email as an ephemeral communication channel instead of a permanent archive.”

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE). “Computer History Museum (CHM), the world’s leading institution exploring the history of computing and its impact on the human experience, today announced the public release and long-term preservation of the Eudora source code, one of the early successful email clients, as part of its Center for Software History’s Historical Source Code. The release comes after a five-year negotiation with Qualcomm. The first version of Eudora was created in the 1980s by Steve Dorner who was working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It took Dorner over a year to create the first version of Eudora, which had 50,000 lines of C code and ran only on the Apple Macintosh.” I miss Eudora a lot.

Ars Technica: Smart Compose and offline mode have arrived in Gmail

Ars Technica: Smart Compose and offline mode have arrived in Gmail. “As promised, Google has rolled out new key features for Gmail. Native offline mail support is now available after it was promised as a follow-up to the major redesign that launched late last month. You have to be using Chrome as your Web browser to access this feature, though.”

Ars Technica: Decade-old Efail flaws can leak plaintext of PGP- and S/MIME-encrypted emails

Ars Technica: Decade-old Efail flaws can leak plaintext of PGP- and S/MIME-encrypted emails. “Unfixed bugs in widely used email programs make it possible for attackers to obtain the plaintext of messages that are encrypted using the PGP and S/MIME standards, researchers said early Monday morning. The attacks assume that an attacker has possession of the encrypted emails and can trick either the original sender or one of the recipients into opening an invisible snippet of the intercepted message in a new email.”