Rolling Stone: We Couldn’t Have Made It Through This Year Without the Saluting Emoji

Rolling Stone: We Couldn’t Have Made It Through This Year Without the Saluting Emoji. “…in the end, no emoji was better suited for the ups and downs 2022 than the saluting face. Everyone from an ex-pro Call of Duty gamer to a Berkeley City Council member to musician Zephani Jong found themselves obsessed with the stalwart little expression. More than one fan has claimed that the emoji changed their lives, helping them persevere through trial and tribulation.” Note to historians coming across this crusty old blog hundreds of years from now: that last sentence may not make sense to you, but it absolutely does to me, and if you manage to reassemble my personality from all the italicized comments I’ve left in ResearchBuzz over the last 25 years, I’ll be happy to explain.

Emo-jional rescue: UBCO researchers create tool to measure the emotion in emojis (University of British Columbia)

University of British Columbia: Emo-jional rescue: UBCO researchers create tool to measure the emotion in emojis. “How much is really known about those smiley faces staring back at from smartphone screens? Anyone who has ever wondered if the people sending them are really that happy is not alone. Thanks to a pair of UBC Okanagan colleagues, researchers striving to better understand the ever-expanding world of emojis now have a new tool to keep pace with technology—what they call a multidimensional lexicon of emojis (MLE).”

BBC: Anti-vax groups use carrot emojis to hide Facebook posts

BBC: Anti-vax groups use carrot emojis to hide Facebook posts. “Facebook groups are using the carrot emoji to hide anti-vax content from automated moderation tools. The BBC has seen several groups, one with hundreds of thousands of members, in which the emoji appears in place of the word ‘vaccine’. Facebook’s algorithms tend to focus on words rather than images. The groups are being used to share unverified claims of people being either injured or killed by vaccines.”

CNET: The Cowboy Is Deeply Misunderstood, Says Adobe Emoji Report

CNET: The Cowboy Is Deeply Misunderstood, Says Adobe Emoji Report. “His warm smile beams out from beneath the rim of his 10-gallon Stetson, bringing farm-to-text delight into every conversation he joins. Summoned by only the most brazen texters, his rambunctious presence offers a sudden jolt of rodeo-howling glee when he rides into a thread. The message he sends? A mysterious riddle. His delivery? Wild and untamable. No one, it seems, truly knows the secrets of the chaotically alluring cowboy emoji.”

Culture Map Houston: Beyoncé rules the internet with historic Twitter emoji celebrating her wildly anticipated new album

Culture Map Houston: Beyoncé rules the internet with historic Twitter emoji celebrating her wildly anticipated new album. “Now, in honor of the news that broke the internet this summer, Twitter has released a new fandom emoji in honor of Houston’s icon. Notably, this is only the second time ever that Twitter is creating an emoji for a fandom: BTS, the insanely popular K-Pop act, received the first custom fandom emoji in 2017 when the group reached 10 million followers.”

WIRED: How to Officially Submit Your Emoji Idea

WIRED: How to Officially Submit Your Emoji Idea. “IF YOU’VE EVER had an idea for a new emoji bouncing around in your head, now’s your chance. The official online submission window for 2022 opened in early April and closes at the end of July. Anyone not familiar with the history of the tiny cartoon images should check out our guide to emoji by senior writer Arielle Pardes, who explains the emoji’s background in Japanese culture and how it’s currently indexed by a nonprofit group known as the Unicode Consortium.”

NPR: Which skin color emoji should you use? The answer can be more complex than you think

NPR: Which skin color emoji should you use? The answer can be more complex than you think. “Heath Racela identifies as three-quarters white and one-quarter Filipino. When texting, he chooses a yellow emoji instead of a skin tone option, because he feels it doesn’t represent any specific ethnicity or color. He doesn’t want people to view his texts in a particular way. He wants to go with what he sees as the neutral option and focus on the message.”